Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
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Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
Understanding how the brain learns, functions and stays healthy.
Curated by Maggie Rouman
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Infographic: Brains, Games and Learning

Infographic: Brains, Games and Learning | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it
Knowing how dopamine-releasing activities can aid student learning could spur changes in classroom instruction.
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Facebook and Your Brain | Psychology Today

Facebook and Your Brain | Psychology Today | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

You don't need a psychiatrist to tell you that the world has gone crazy over Facebook. The incredible hype over this month’s public offering showed us that as did the over 900 million people using Facebook at least monthly. Here’s a quick look at some brain chemistry to help explain why.
Some say that inside information is the fuel that drives Wall Street. Well, the inside dope on Facebook is dopamine, an organic chemical released in the brain and associated with pleasurable feelings.

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Dopamine & The Neuroscience of Bad Habits: Dr. Nora Volkow

Dopamine & The Neuroscience of Bad Habits: Dr. Nora Volkow | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

Just because our brains have been altered by addiction, doesn't mean we're destined to fall into the same habits. In the 60 Minutes video, Volkow tells us that if it were so easy to just say "no," then we wouldn't have drug addiction or obesity. There's something going on in the brains of addicts where they literally lose the ability for self-control. To get more specific, dopamine is one of the main chemicals regulating the pleasure center of the brain. At the most basic level, it regulates motivation -- it sends signals to receptors in the brain saying, "This feels good!" (Video)

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The Pleasure of the Tweet | David Linden | Big Think

Do digital media have any sweeping, unique pleasure-giving qualities? David J. Linden, Professor in the Department of Neuroscience at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, says the effect is a lot like the pleasure we get from gambling.
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Sleep Deprived? Mind your dopamine | The Scicurious Brain, Scientific American Blog Network

Sleep Deprived? Mind your dopamine | The Scicurious Brain, Scientific American Blog Network | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

We all know what sleep deprivation does to us. We’re unable to pay attention. We’re often cold or hot. We can’t think straight, we start doing very strange things (you would not BELIEVE the crazy dances I’ve made up…), and of course, we’re really, really tired. But why do these symptoms happening? What’s going on in the brain during sleep deprivation to explain this behavior? Well, in part, it might be changes in your D2 receptors.

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Dopamine: Duality of Desire | The Scientist

Dopamine: Duality of Desire | The Scientist | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

" In my book, Memoirs of an Addicted Brain, I weave together a personal account of my years of addiction with descriptions of brain states induced by drugs ranging from alcohol and LSD to heroin, as well as brain states underlying addiction itself.

Why are addicts so desperate? Why is it so hard to stop? Neuroscientists seek the answer in a single molecule: dopamine—a neuromodulator long associated with reward." (Book)

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Science Reveals Why We Brag So Much

Science Reveals Why We Brag So Much | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

Talking about ourselves—whether in a personal conversation or through social media sites like Facebook and Twitter—triggers the same sensation of pleasure in the brain as food or money, researchers reported Monday. About 40% of everyday speech is devoted to telling others about what we feel or think. Now, through five brain imaging and behavioral experiments, Harvard University neuroscientists have uncovered the reason: It feels so rewarding, at the level of brain cells and synapses, that we can't help sharing our thoughts.

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