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Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness
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Research Shows That the Smarter People Are, the More Susceptible They Are to Cognitive Bias-Jonah Lehrer

Research Shows That the Smarter People Are, the More Susceptible They Are to Cognitive Bias-Jonah Lehrer | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

"Here’s a simple arithmetic question: A bat and ball cost a dollar and ten cents. The bat costs a dollar more than the ball. How much does the ball cost? The vast majority of people respond quickly and confidently,...For more than five decades, Daniel Kahneman, a Nobel Laureate and professor of psychology at Princeton, has been asking questions like this and analyzing our answers. His disarmingly simple experiments have profoundly changed the way we think about thinking."

 

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The Neuroscience Of Effort-By Jonah Lehrer

The Neuroscience Of Effort-By Jonah Lehrer | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

"While writing this post, I will get bored. I will get tired of looking at these words and crave a distraction. And so I will click away from this page and head somewhere else, amusing myself with a totally irrelevant website. After a few lovely minutes of wasted time, my feelings of guilt will grow and I will find my way back here, to this sentence. Such are the moment-by-moment melodramas of work. It’s a constant cycle of intrinsic motivation battling against extrinsic tedium, persistence against pleasure. We know what we need to do. And yet, it’s always so much easier to do what we want to do.... A fascinating new paper in the Journal of Neuroscience led by Michael Treadway at Vanderbilt University begins to unpack the mystery. It’s a first draft of what happens in the brain as we choose between effort and indulgence, work and distraction."

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The neuroscience of Bob Dylan's genius

The neuroscience of Bob Dylan's genius | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

How do we have insights, and where does inspiration come from? Jonah Lehrer goes inside Bob Dylan's brain to find out.

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The New Neuroscience of Choking-Jonah Lehrer

The New Neuroscience of Choking-Jonah Lehrer | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

"Choking isn’t just a hazard for athletes: the condition also afflicts opera singers and actors, hedge-fund traders and chess grandmasters. All of sudden, just when these experts most need to perform, their expertise is lost. The grace of talent disappears. As Malcolm Gladwell pointed out in his 2000 article on the psychology of choking, the phenomenon can seem like an amorphous category of failure. Nevertheless, choking is actually triggered by a specific mental mistake: thinking too much...Sian Beilock, a professor of psychology at the University of Chicago, has documented the choking process in her lab."

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The Amygdala Made Me Do It-The New York Times

The Amygdala Made Me Do It-The New York Times | Learning, Brain & Cognitive Fitness | Scoop.it

WHY are we thinking so much about thinking these days? Near the top of best-seller lists around the country, you’ll find Jonah Lehrer’s “Imagine: How Creativity Works,” followed by Charles Duhigg’s book “The Power of Habit: Why We Do What We Do in Life and Business,”....Daniel Kahneman’s “Thinking, Fast and Slow.”....“Subliminal: How Your Unconscious Mind Rules Your Behavior,” by Leonard Mlodinow. These books possess a unifying theme: The choices we make in day-to-day life are prompted by impulses lodged deep within the nervous system. Not only are we not masters of our fate; we are captives of biological determinism. Once we enter the portals of the strange neuronal world known as the brain, we discover that — to put the matter plainly — we have no idea what we’re doing.  (Book Reviews)

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