Learning At Work
19.2K views | +21 today
Follow
Learning At Work
Meeting our Future Skills Requirements
Curated by Roger Francis
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Why The Most Productive People Do These Six Things Every Day

Why The Most Productive People Do These Six Things Every Day | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Of all our available resources, everyone has the same number of hours in a day. Some, however, happen to get more done. Are they faster or smarter? Do they have more help? Perhaps. But they’ve also learned tricks that can help them stretch time and eliminate the unimportant.

Here are six things super-productive people do every day to maximize their results and success.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 15, 5:27 PM

The secrets behind four-minute meetings and scrapping your to-do list.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

10 Effective Communication Habits of the Most Successful People

10 Effective Communication Habits of the Most Successful People | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Being able to communicate effectively, I believe, is one of the best life skills you can develop. Think about it, colleagues who can masterfully communicate their thoughts, feelings, ideas, concerns and wishes are better equipped to manage or avoid conflict, negotiate win-win scenarios, and increase their ability to collaborate at a high level.

 

Yet effective communication isn't just about talking; it is also the ability to listen and understand the other side of the fence, to "read" and interpret body language, and to know how to approach another person so you can get your points across in a respectful manner.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
Bryan Worn's curator insight, December 14, 2016 2:18 AM

Good reminder checklist if things have gone off course in our communication.

Adele Taylor's curator insight, December 14, 2016 3:58 PM
Some great communication tips!
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, December 15, 2016 4:32 AM

Post very interesting, revealing some aspects that I did not know about communication. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish, more about people behavior can be read in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

12 things successful people do in the last 10 minutes of the workday

12 things successful people do in the last 10 minutes of the workday | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Perhaps you spend the last 10 minutes of your workday staring at the clock, counting down the seconds until you’re free. Or, maybe you bury yourself in your work until the very last minute — then you grab your stuff and go without saying goodbye to your colleagues.

 

If either of the above scenarios sounds familiar, it may be time to reassess your end-of-day routine. “How you finish the workday is very important,” says Michael Kerr, an international business speaker and author of “The Humour Advantage.” “It can set your mood for the rest of your day; it may impact your personal relationships, overall level of happiness, and how well you sleep that night; and it will set the stage for the next day.”

 


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 23, 2016 4:30 PM

Perhaps you spend the last 10 minutes of your workday staring at the clock, counting down the seconds until you’re free. Or, maybe you bury yourself in your work until the very last minute — then you grab your stuff and go without saying goodbye to your colleagues.

 

If either of the above scenarios sounds familiar, it may be time to reassess your end-of-day routine.

Jerry Busone's curator insight, December 1, 2016 7:37 AM

These tip are simple and really work ... love 3,4 9, 11 and do them everyday.Try it 

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Learning - Social Media - Innovation
Scoop.it!

How To Negotiate When You're At A Disadvantage

How To Negotiate When You're At A Disadvantage | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
In an ideal world, a negotiation is fair. Whether it’s a sales deal, salary package, or overarching agreement, the best negotiations have two or more parties who are looking for common ground and committed to finding the best possible solution for all.
 

But, we don’t live in an ideal world. Bias, deception, and hidden agendas can put even the most forthright negotiator at a disadvantage. A new study bears this out. Women ask for raises as often as their male counterparts, however the research found that they got what they wanted 25% less often.

 

Whether you’re dealing with people’s stereotypes or biases because of who you are, or if there’s another reason your counterpart is not being forthright and honest, how you handle the negotiation can make all the difference, says leadership consultant and career coach Avery Blank.


Via The Learning Factor, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 15, 2016 4:27 PM

Even when the playing field isn't level, you can still make the negotiation more fair.

sludgeconsider's comment, November 15, 2016 10:03 PM
excellent
Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, November 25, 2016 11:14 AM
Negotiation skills
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Why We Are Addicted To Multitasking And 5 Ways To Break The Habit

Why We Are Addicted To Multitasking And 5 Ways To Break The Habit | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

“Multitasking is a survival strategy.”

“I’m an excellent multitasker!”

 

Science has told us that these conclusions are in fact delusions. Yet, they persist. Sure, it’s possible to drive to work and listen to a podcast, but that’s because only one of those tasks requires active cognitive engagement. When both tasks require simultaneous processing, 98% of us can’t do it. Have you noticed that if you get lost while driving, you turn off the radio? That’s because you now need your full cognitive horsepower to navigate.

 

The same is true at work. While you may only be browsing emails during a meeting, you’ve transferred your attention from the meeting to your inbox. You are present, but not cognitively engaged.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
Janet Howcroft's curator insight, November 6, 2016 5:26 PM

“Multitasking is a survival strategy.”

“I’m an excellent multitasker!” most women are!

 - November 2
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 8, 2016 3:57 AM

Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, November 8, 2016 11:48 PM
We are multitasking like never before, and technology has made it possible. Experts warn us that the quality of work deteriorates when we multitask. They tell us that we might be deluding ourselves if we think we are multitasking when we are listening to music while driving the car, and talking to our friend who is sitting next to us, because 'only one of those tasks requires active cognitive engagement.' The brain focuses on one task out of many other tasks, thus be warned not to be on the phone while driving, or even crossing the street lest all your attention is driven away from the speeding car by the video you are watching on your smart phone!
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Leadership
Scoop.it!

7 Things Wildly Successful People Do Before 7:30 a.m.

7 Things Wildly Successful People Do Before 7:30 a.m. | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
Successful people come from all walks of life, yet they all have one thing in common: where others see impenetrable barriers, they see challenges to embrace and obstacles to overcome.

Their confidence in the face of hardship is driven by their ability to let go of the negativity that holds so many otherwise sensible people back.Obstacles do not block the path; they are the path.

 

And it all starts with their morning routines. Here’s how ultra-successful people utilize the first hours of the day:

 

Via The Learning Factor, Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 23, 2016 5:58 PM

These are the unique early morning habits of some of the world’s most successful people. Try them out and see where they take you.

Lisa Gorman's curator insight, October 25, 2016 12:29 AM

It's a quick read but an important reminder about how much you can achieve with an EXCELLENT start to the day... be that a bit earlier than most!  I have to say that my morning meditation and walking practice has sustained me in the last few months...I'm so grateful that a friend shared with me the Miracle Morning (http://www.miraclemorning.com/) when I needed it most.  

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Three Science-Backed Ways To Influence Other People's Decisions

Three Science-Backed Ways To Influence Other People's Decisions | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
 

Your brain takes mental shortcuts all the time in order to make decisions efficiently. Because that takes place unconsciously, we can never fully control these "cognitive biases" that help us deal with the outside world—and, ultimately, survive in it. As practical as they may be, though, some of these biases can be problematic.

 

But the first step toward gaining a little more leverage over how your brain—and others' brains—make judgments is simply to understand the rules it follows to do so. Getting better acquainted with these three may help you become more influential with others.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 4, 2016 10:30 PM

If you want to influence others' decisions, you've got to understand the mental shortcuts they use to make them.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

8 Powerful Ways To Conquer Stress

8 Powerful Ways To Conquer Stress | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

The ability to manage your emotions and remain calm under pressure has a direct link to your performance. TalentSmart has conducted research with more than a million people, and found that 90% of top performers are skilled at managing their emotions in times of stress in order to remain calm and in control.

 

Stress has a funny way of sneaking up on you when you least expect it, but how you respond is only half the battle. The secret to winning the war against stress lies in what you do when you aren’t working (and presumably aren’t as stressed). Otherwise, you fall into bad habits that can magnify your stress, rather than alleviate it. You need to shift gears to these relaxing and rejuvenating activities during your time off.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, September 30, 2016 6:38 AM
Useful post, presenting some good tips. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in continuing education in business, please visit http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, October 3, 2016 12:53 PM
Stress is the biggest gift of the information technology age. It might in its extreme phase lead to inefficiency and a serious shortfall in output. In schools this happens when teachers have to handle too many tasks at a time, and this includes their being given too many deadlines. The best way to beat stress would be to disconnect from anything that is distracting or even overwhelming in nature, even if it means disconnecting from the net. Another important way is to limit chores, prioritise tasks, as such. In addition to all these steps, one could also take a break to exercise or move around. Most teachers will ask their students to beat the stress of a difficult lesson by giving them a few minutes to get up from their chairs and stretch.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

These 4 Hobbies Can Actually Improve Job Performance

These 4 Hobbies Can Actually Improve Job Performance | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
 While downtime of any kind can help relieve stress, there are several science-backed ways that let you enjoy life outside of the office while improving your productivity within it.
 

Research conducted by Kevin Eschleman, an assistant psychology professor at San Francisco State University, suggests hobbies that are less relevant to one’s career are paradoxically more beneficial for it.

 

"Whatever the activity is that you're doing in your free time, it becomes incredibly more valuable if it is different from what you've been doing most recently in your work environment," Eschelman told Fast Company in a previous interview. "People need to be mindful and aware of what resources they're using in the work environment to realize which resources they need to protect and refuel in their free time," he said.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 14, 2016 6:32 PM

How you spend your downtime can have a profound impact on your productivity levels at work.

Kimberly Kline's curator insight, August 15, 2016 5:32 PM
Be Creative!  Spending your free time listening or playing music, getting outside and moving, or even playing video games will actually make you more productive at work ~ and I believe it will also make you happier overall!
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The Hidden Curriculum of Work

The Hidden Curriculum of Work | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

What do you do for work? Not, what is your job title, or what’s written in your official job description? But what do you actually do?

 

It’s potentially the most important question you can ask yourself if you care about standing out, staying ahead of the change curve, and continuously elevating your performance to gain access to choice assignments and opportunities to advance.

 

This is because the value you deliver, the results you produce, and the impact you have on others come more often from the execution of unspoken intangibles that are not reflected in your title, job description, or the daily tasks and activities you’re responsible for. This severe mismatch is based on a fundamental misunderstanding of the true demands of work.

 


Via The Learning Factor
more...
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 10, 2016 5:33 AM
The hidden curriculum of work, is about what goes beyond your job profile. When you apply for a perticular post, you are accepting two jobs, one is the what you applied for, and the other is the interpersonal work, the hidden curriulum that goes with the post. The post of teaching includes your knowledge of the subject, pedagogical skills and most immportant of all are your inter-personal skills, your life skills, your attitude towards the learners, approachablility...etc.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, August 10, 2016 8:11 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, August 10, 2016 11:19 AM

Excellent discussion of something that I believe is often ignored and really forms the core of career management.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

What Happened When I Gave Up Multitasking For A Week

What Happened When I Gave Up Multitasking For A Week | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
The problem with multitasking is that it just doesn’t work as well as we think it does.
 

The efficiency myth has been debunked by numerous experts and studies. For example, research from Stanford revealed that the more people multitask, the more they are training their brain to be scattered, and the less they are able to be creative or develop emotional intelligence. Another study from the suggested that your IQ can drop as much as if you’d missed a night of sleep. And the American Psychological Association revealed that a group of studies proved that workers performing juggling acts were actually costing a lot more time and increasing the chance of errors. Overall, this degrades your brain’s executive function as well as damaging your productivity.

 


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 26, 2016 6:39 PM

Juggling isn't doing you, or your boss, any favors. So I tried to do just one thing at a time. It was harder than I thought it would be.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The 6-Step Process To Train Your Brain To Focus

The 6-Step Process To Train Your Brain To Focus | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

There’s a growing body of research about how counterproductive multitasking can be. While we may feel like we’re getting more done, the reality is that regular multitasking can leave us with a diminishing ability to focus.

 

That’s good to know. But if you’re a chronic multitasker who finds it hard to focus, is there any hope of getting your attention span back?

 

While neuroscientist Daniel Levitin, psychology professor at McGill University in Montreal and author of This Is Your Brain on Music: The Science of a Human Obsession won’t speak definitively for everyone, he says there are some general things most of us can do to improve our focus. Put these practices into place to sharpen your concentration and be more effective.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
Marc Kneepkens's curator insight, January 10, 5:58 PM

#Focus is essential in our life, all the time. Stay focused and you'll be successful.

Dove Nobel's comment, January 11, 10:20 AM
http://www.citynews.com/classifieds/category/397/computer/listings/130569/Get-the-Best-Solutions-for-HP-Printer-Issues.html
Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, January 12, 6:20 AM
There are some general things most of us can do to improve our focus. Put these practices into place to sharpen your concentration and be more effective.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

The Emotionally Intelligent Person's Guide To Disagreeing With Your Boss

The Emotionally Intelligent Person's Guide To Disagreeing With Your Boss | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

There are few occasions where having high emotional intelligence (EQ) comes in handy more than when you disagree with your boss. But it's hardly the only one. Many of us would even happily trade off a few IQ points in exchange for some extra EQ. In fact, people with very high IQs but lower emotional intelligence may be more likely to upset their bosses by focusing too much on the logical side of an argument while ignoring the social and emotional dimensions.

 

In fact, the most effective approach to disagreeing with your manager should really be based on EQ rather than IQ. Unsurprisingly, research suggests that employees with higher emotional intelligence are generally more rewarding to deal with, which is why they're more often promoted than those who aren't. In a world that still bases so many crucial career decisions on a single subjective factor in the eyes of one's direct manager, likability often trumps ability and work ethic.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, December 4, 2016 4:43 PM

Hint: Know when to cut your losses and back down.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Use This Five-Part Checklist To Tell If You're Overcommunicating

Use This Five-Part Checklist To Tell If You're Overcommunicating | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

There’s definitely some truth in the wisdom that it’s better to overcommunicate than undercommunicate. Ideally, every manager gives their team members just enough direction to get on course and the leeway to do their thing free of micromanagement.

 

The reality is often different, though. No good boss wants to leave their teams feeling empty-handed or unsupported, so they sometimes veer off too far in the opposite direction. I’ve learned the hard way that overcommunication is easier to fall into than you might think, and it winds up obfuscating my message and wasting everyone’s time.

 

Fortunately, I’ve managed to get better at figuring out when my communication is more distracting than useful. Here are some of the key criteria I use in order to tell whether I'm overcommunicating


Via The Learning Factor
more...
rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, November 20, 2016 11:42 PM
Overcomunication can sometimes be ineffective communication. repetitive and redundant information has the tendency to fall on deaf ears. I have learnt this the hard way while teaching senior students in school! Students 'zone out' when they listen to information that is repetitive, resulting in 'overcommunication!' Professionals, especially in leadership positions can avoid the curse of overcommunication by taking care about the timing of the communication, ensuring that it is not redundant, examining its value, and ensuring that it is coherent, according to the the writer.
Ellen Naylor's curator insight, November 22, 2016 11:05 AM

My favorite tips: 

  • Is this person going to be grateful to have this information?
  • What’s the worst that happens if I don’t send this message?
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 23, 2016 3:02 AM

Useful post, presenting an innovative checklist. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in education in business, please visit http://quanticaconsultoria.com

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

5 Common Communication Misfires (And How To Avoid Them)

5 Common Communication Misfires (And How To Avoid Them) | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
 

Miscommunication happens frequently in life and work, partly because technology allows us to communicate faster, but not necessarily better. While some miscommunications are merely annoying, others can create conflict or be a disrupting influence in relationships.

 

Based on being both the giver and the recipient of unintended communication gaffes, here are five reasons why I believe they occur, and what to do to prevent them in the future.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, November 10, 2016 5:55 PM

Tech enables faster communication, but that also means there's a greater chance to say something you didn't intend.

Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, November 15, 2016 5:06 AM

Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

How To Harness Psychology To Ace Your Performance Review

How To Harness Psychology To Ace Your Performance Review | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Performance reviews have been reportedly going extinct for quite some time. But they aren't completely in the grave yet, and maybe they shouldn't be. Despite the dread with which many employees greet their year-end evaluations,psychological studies have shown that people still generally find them useful—as long as those reviews offer a chance to discuss relevant issues, outline key objectives, and provide constructive feedback.

 

But for that to happen, you need to go in prepared. In fact, you may think the biggest factor in your success is how you perform throughout the year, but your manager may know less about how well you're actually performing than you may hope—meaning your annual review might count for more than you imagine. That can be good news for you, though. These are three tips, based on some fundamentals of human psychology, to help tilt the field in your favor.


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 27, 2016 5:41 PM

Hint: It's about your boss's job as much as your own.

Hugo Hernandez's curator insight, October 28, 2016 2:28 AM

Hint: It's about your boss's job as much as your own.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Turning Your Calendar Into A Peak Performance Tool

Turning Your Calendar Into A Peak Performance Tool | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

There is a world of difference between normal activity and peak performance.  It’s the glimpses into the peak state that fuel the intuition that we’re meant for greater things.  In this article, we’ll take a look at peak performance and a surprisingly simple strategy for more consistently tapping into our peak mode.

 

The Psychology of Peak Performance

Two elements turn ordinary activities into performance activities: 1) we keep score of the outcomes that matter and 2) we institute practice measures to systematically pursue the improvement of our scores.  Such deliberate practice lies at the heart of the development of chess players, athletes, Broadway stars, and elite medical facilities.  Once we keep score and devote ourselves to a continuous improvement in what we do and how we do it, we transform routine into growth.  Recreation is not a cumulative activity.  It is activity pursued at the time for its own sake.  Peak performance, on the other hand, is cumulative: it’s a focused, ongoing attempt at improvement.  We can go to the gym for enjoyment or we can go to the gym to train for aerobic conditioning.  The first activity is expressive and present-centered; the second is instrumental and forward-focused.

 


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, October 23, 2016 6:01 PM

Many of the professionals I work with in financial markets, in their candid moments of introspection, express a heartfelt sentiment.  They are doing well, but could be doing better, much better.  They are good, but they could be great.  In their moments of particular success, they recognize that the level [...]

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Get More Done: 15 Things the Most Successful People Do Differently to Be More Productive

Get More Done: 15 Things the Most Successful People Do Differently to Be More Productive | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

1. They focus on minutes, not hours.

Average performers default to hours and half-hour blocks on their calendar. Highly successful people know there are 1,440 minutes in every day and there is nothing more valuable than time. Money can be lost and made again, but time spent can never be reclaimed.

As legendary Olympic gymnast Shannon Miller told him, "To this day, I keep a schedule that is almost minute by minute."

You must master your minutes to master your life.

 

2. They focus only on one thing.

Ultra productive people know their Most Important Task (MIT) and work on it for one to two hours each morning, without interruptions.

Tom Ziglar, CEO of Ziglar Inc., said, "Invest the first part of your day working on your number one priority that will help build your business."

What task will have the biggest impact on reaching your goal? What accomplishment will get you promoted at work?


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 29, 2016 7:54 PM

And the best part is, you can adopt them all.

Ąžuolas Lomonosovas's curator insight, October 2, 2016 5:25 AM

Easy guide for more productivity. You don't need to work harder, you need to work smarter.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Leadership Lite
Scoop.it!

Master the One-on-One Meeting

Master the One-on-One Meeting | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Whether you’re a CEO or a line manager, your team is just as important as a group as its members are as individuals. Today’s tech companies offer many perks to attract and retain the best employees. We offer competitive salaries, training and the promise of success—professionally and financially. But how we treat them as individuals can determine the way their DNA will impact the fabric of your organization. What are you doing, as their manager, to make sure they are satisfied and making the best contribution to your organization?

 

Whether it’s an hour a week or 30 minutes once a month, making time for an individual says you give a damn about them as a person.

The 1:1 is the only forum where you can have an honest, private, conversation with each other about what’s really going on—professionally and personally.

This is a routine opportunity for you, as a manager, to assess the parts (your employees) that lead to the productive whole (your team)—which we all know is more powerful than the sum of said parts.
Via The Learning Factor, Kevin Watson
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 25, 2016 6:37 PM

The one-on-one meeting between supervisor and staff is an invauable tool for managing, but requires much attention to detail. 

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 26, 2016 4:09 AM
The one on one meetings usually take place before annual assessments of employee performance. Appraisal reports are often preceded by a one on one meeting with the employee. In many cases, misunderstandings are removed when these 1-1 meetings take place.
Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, August 26, 2016 7:41 AM
Very interesting subject to be considered and discussed. I will disclose the post to my contacts and subscribers in http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

When To Influence People, When To Inform Them, And How To Know The Difference

When To Influence People, When To Inform Them, And How To Know The Difference | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

In order to get your leaders to have confidence in your ideas and your career potential, you need to persuade them. Sharing information—informing your supervisors—is part of that process, but it isn't the process itself. No matter how much you want them to understand the depth of your work, your knowledge, and your expertise, your leaders are not studying for a test. By shifting your focus from educating to influencing, you can build the credibility you need to get where you're trying to go.

 

When you try to educate somebody about a particular subject, you implicitly assume that you have the power. You're the one with ideas, knowledge, and information—that's why you're imparting it, after all. Everyone else is just hoping to soak in as much as they can.

 


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 10, 2016 9:22 PM

Sharing knowledge, expertise, and information can help you be more persuasive, but it isn't persuasion itself.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
Scoop.it!

Five Creative Ways To Power Through The Afternoon Slump

Five Creative Ways To Power Through The Afternoon Slump | Learning At Work | Scoop.it
 If your mind starts to wander and you could really use a nap or a candy bar around 2 p.m., you’re not alone. The afternoon slump is real, and it’s your body's response to a drop in your blood-sugar levels as well as its natural circadian rhythm. In fact, one of our strongest biological urges to sleep comes between 1 p.m. and 3 p.m., according to the National Sleep Foundation.
 

Taking the afternoon off isn’t usually an option, but some companies have found some fun and effective hacks for tackling the afternoon slump.

 

 1. DANCE PARTIES

Employees at the mortgage lender United Shore look forward to 10-minute dance parties held every Thursday afternoon at 3 p.m. The idea began as a small gathering of five or six people and became so popular that the company installed a dance floor on the second floor to accommodate a crowd of more than 100.

 

"We have a lot of team members at United Shore who work from their desks and are focused on hitting their daily goals," says CEO Mat Ishbia. "The dance parties give them a little break to get up, reenergize themselves and get back to their day. That energy helps us stay focused."


Via The Learning Factor
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 26, 2016 6:49 PM

These companies have found a way to keep their employees engaged instead of dragging in the afternoons, and it doesn't involve caffeine.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Coporate Training and eLearning
Scoop.it!

Training vs Learning: What’s the Difference?

Training vs Learning: What’s the Difference? | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Ask yourself this: How often am I actually creating training experiences that are teaching someone to do anything?  


Via SHIFT eLearning
more...
No comment yet.