Learning At Work
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How to Mentally Prepare for a Difficult Conversation

How to Mentally Prepare for a Difficult Conversation | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

How can you mentally prepare for a difficult conversation? You’ll want to think about the logistics (where and when you meet) and your strategy (how will you frame the problem and what you’ll say first). But getting ready emotionally is perhaps the most important work you need to do before you get into the room. Here are a few things you can go do to get ready.


Via donhornsby
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donhornsby's curator insight, April 5, 2016 9:00 AM
(From the article): Susan David, a psychologist and coauthor of the Harvard Business Review article Emotional Agility, says that “suppressing your emotions — deciding not to say something when you’re upset—can lead to bad results.” She explains that if you don’t express your emotions, they’re likely to show up elsewhere. Psychologists call this emotional leakage. “Have you ever yelled at your spouse or child after a frustrating day at work—a frustration that had nothing to do with him or her? When you bottle up your feelings, you’re likely to express your emotions in unintended ways instead, either sarcastically or in a completely different context. Suppressing your emotions is associated with poor memory, difficulties in relationships, and physiological costs (such as cardiovascular health problems),” David explains. Prevent your emotions from seeping out — in the conversation or at home — by getting your feelings out ahead of time. That way, you’ll be more centered and calm when you’re having the discussion. You may be wondering, Do I really need to do this for one 10-minute conversation? While it takes some time (though it will get easier the more you do it), there is a huge payoff. You’ll go into the conversation with the right mindset, feeling confident, knowing what you want to achieve.
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How To (Constructively) Disagree With Your Boss

How To (Constructively) Disagree With Your Boss | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Whatever your feelings toward your boss, the fact is that he or she got to that position because of some combination of experience, expertise, and training. In other words, they earned it. That doesn't mean you'll always agree with the decisions your boss makes. Sometimes you'll even be certain your boss is wrong—either on something small and harmless or much more consequential.

So how do you challenge your boss respectfully and productively? It can be daunting to point out a difference of opinion to someone we report to. Many of us simply aren't great communicators when it comes to those in higher positions.

But with a little effort and tact, you can disagree with your boss in a way that's respectful and gets things done.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 6, 2015 6:58 PM

The best teams thrive on productive disagreement. Here's how to plead your case respectfully.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Coaching Leaders
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Fixing a Work Relationship Gone Sour

Fixing a Work Relationship Gone Sour | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

The good news is that even some of the most strained relationships can be repaired. In fact, a negative relationship turned positive can be a very strong one. “Going through difficult experiences can be the makings of the strongest, most resilient relationships,” says Susan David, a founder of the Harvard/McLean Institute of Coaching and author of the HBR article, “Emotional Agility.” The bad news is that fixing a relationship takes serious effort.

 

“Most people just lower their expectations because it’s easier than dealing with the real issues at hand,” says Brian Uzzi, professor of leadership and organizational change at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management and author of the HBR article, “Make Your Enemies Your Allies.” But, he says, the hard work is often worth it, especially in a work environment where productivity and performance are at stake. Here’s how to transform a work relationship that’s turned sour.


Via The Learning Factor, David Hain
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 20, 2014 6:27 PM

Sometimes you get stuck in a rut with someone at work — a boss, a coworker, a direct report. Perhaps there’s bad blood between you or you simply haven’t been getting along. What can you do to turn the relationship around? Is it possible to start anew?

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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See Colleagues as They Are, Not as They Were

See Colleagues as They Are, Not as They Were | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Is there a colleague with whom you have a strained working relationship? If, by chance, you are some kind of work superhero who just answered “no” to that question, is there at least someone with whom you would like to have a better relationship?

If so, please ask yourself the following questions in relation to that person:

Do you notice him as he truly is today, or based on your memory of how he was last week or last month – or even last year?When you have a conversation with him, is your only aim to change his mind? Or also to change your own?When you see his name in your inbox, do you already have a “story” about him, before even opening the email?

These issues get to the heart (and brain) of executive mindfulness. While we know from research that mindfulness is good for us, what seems to be missing from the conversation is how one might be mindful at work, without meditating at our desks or breaking into a sun salutation. But an understanding of mindfulness – how it really operates in the context of daily work activities – is essential to good working relationships; relationships that let both us and our coworkers grow and change over time.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, January 14, 2016 4:49 PM

It’s essential for better relationships.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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7 Quick Ways to Connect With Anybody

7 Quick Ways to Connect With Anybody | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

If you're introverted (like me), you may find it difficult to connect with people at social gatherings. If you're extroverted, you face a different challenge--your outgoing personality may run roughshod over people you'd like to know better.

Not to worry. There's help for all of us.

At the Reader's Legacy awards last weekend, I had the opportunity to meet with Larry Benet, who is the co-founder of SANG Events, which feature speakers like Tony Hsieh, Tony Robbins, and Jack Canfield.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, June 14, 2015 6:46 PM

Grow your business (and enrich your life experience) with these seven simple questions that move conversations from chitchat into relationship building.

Graeme Reid's curator insight, June 15, 2015 7:46 PM

Some helpful questions for networking events.

Lisa Gorman's curator insight, June 15, 2015 9:35 PM

This article has inspired mynext 'Communication Blues & Clues' blog post which be arriving tomorrow about the importance of how we structure our QUESTIONS... there are some EXCELLENT questions here  by Larry Benet - I can recommend this very quick read for those who get stuck on what questions to ask others in networking situations!