Learning At Work
17.4K views | +7 today
Follow
Learning At Work
Meeting our Future Skills Requirements
Curated by Roger Francis
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Leadership Lite
Scoop.it!

How to Boldly Face Your Fear of Criticism

How to Boldly Face Your Fear of Criticism | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Many of my clients deal with a fear of criticism. I see it in several aspects of their lives. At work, people fear criticism from their managers and colleagues, so they keep quiet and don't share their opinions. They play it safe. At home, people fear that they'll be criticized by their spouse or partner, so they don't speak their mind. They back down when they sense conflict. In friendships, people often don't have boundaries because they fear that establishing them would lead to criticism or that they would be viewed as selfish.

 

Whatever the setting, it's this fear that keeps people stuck. For example, by not speaking up and not sharing your ideas, you'll never advance. People won't know your thoughts and will have no reason to recognize your worth and promote you.


Via The Learning Factor, Kevin Watson
more...
The Clear Thinking Partnership's curator insight, July 1, 2015 5:27 AM

This continues to be a tricky area of performance for so many leaders.........

Michael Anderson's curator insight, July 1, 2015 6:57 AM

A very positive article. Well worth reading.

Edwin Abdiel Rodz's curator insight, July 9, 2015 2:13 PM

We all go through the fear of criticism.  Be it about your business, video or even your talent in general.  Fear in itself is a very paralyzing thing, but when it reaches the topic that will source your future it tends to be taking even more seriously than it really is. 


There's this phrase that really calmed me down when I launched my first android app and started receiving negative ratings (not even many... just 2 out of 50).  "Don't sweat it; you have knowledge now".  

Knowledge is the antidote of fear after all.  Criticism shouldn't become a fear because it's actual knowledge of something that could be modified.  


Here are a few tips of how to handle criticism correctly.    There's never any reason to be scared of criticism.


Rescooped by Roger Francis from Manage your Manager
Scoop.it!

How to Deal With A Boss With Zero Emotional Intelligence

How to Deal With A Boss With Zero Emotional Intelligence | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

You might already know that your emotional intelligence can influence your job success. But what about your callously oblivious boss or your ambiguously rigid colleagues?

 

Boosting your emotional intelligence might mean you are better at your job--but what can you do if your boss or colleagues don't exhibit anything close to emotional intelligence?

 

The good news is, the situations more hopeful than you think. The bad news is, you might have to have a difficult conversation. But don't worry, we've got you covered.


Via The Learning Factor, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 27, 2014 7:37 AM

To work well with people with low Emotional Intelligence, you need to learn how to communicate differently. Here's how to make sure they get it.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Manage your Manager
Scoop.it!

The 7 Common (And Totally Avoidable) Mistakes New Managers Make

The 7 Common (And Totally Avoidable) Mistakes New Managers Make | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

The transition to management isn’t easy. One study found it was almost as stressful as divorce.

 

No wonder people screw it up. But while “Everyone certainly has the right to screw up in her own individual way,” says Lindsey Pollak, whose new management book Becoming the Boss is out this month, there are also “classic mistakes” made by “pretty much everyone I interviewed.” Here’s what they are, and how to avoid them:

 

1. Keeping The Star Mindset

 

People often get promoted because they are awesome at what they do. But once you’re in management, “your job is no longer to be the star as a contributor. Your job is now to manage through other people’s successes,” says Pollak. This is a huge change in thinking, and unfortunately, many new managers “keep trying to do their old jobs and be a manager at the same time.”

 


Via The Learning Factor, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
more...
The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 3, 2014 6:31 PM

Yes, you were good enough to get promoted but being a manger has challenges you never dealt with when you were an employee.