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Stop Wanting And Start Doing: 5 Practices For Building Mental Toughness

Stop Wanting And Start Doing: 5 Practices For Building Mental Toughness | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

I’ve been asked on a number of occasions the “secret” to harnessing mental toughness to overcome adversity. The “secret,” I tell them, isn’t a secret but a fact that they don’t want to hear because it’s simple. But simple isn’t easy. That secret is this: make a decision and go with it.

That’s it.

I remember waiting for Hell Week to begin in BUD/S (Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL training) and students asking the instructors—in a somewhat uncommon cordial setting—what the secret was to making it through five and a half days of constant, nonstop activity. Here’s what the instructors said, “The secret to making it through BUD/S, is knowing you’re going to make it through BUD/S.”

It’s belief.

You need to believe that you’re the type of person who has the skill and will to make that goal happen, and then make it happen. Don’t worry about what’s right and don’t wait for the perfect opportunity because “perfect” doesn’t exist—it’s an excuse to procrastinate.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 28, 6:17 PM

Mental toughness is a muscle, and like all other muscles, it demands consistent exercise to get stronger.

Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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6 Ways To Become A Better Listener 

6 Ways To Become A Better Listener  | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Ever zone out while someone is talking? Of course. We all do. The average human has an eight-second attention span. With electronic distractions competing for your time and an abundance of responsibilities at work, it makes listening attentively to someone else speak pretty difficult.

“We are living in a time when it’s more challenging to be consistently aware and intentional because so many things are demanding our attention. Our brains haven’t caught up to the technology that’s feeding them,” says Scott Eblin, author of Overworked and Overwhelmed: The Mindfulness Alternative. “The impact of this leaves people in a chronic condition of fight or flight.”


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 19, 7:23 PM

Humans have an average eight-second attention span. You’re going to need to do better if you want to get things done.

donhornsby's curator insight, March 20, 9:01 AM
We all require self-focus, but leaders who make a difference are the ones who know the purpose is bigger than themselves, says Gregersen. “When a leader is operating on the edge of what’s possible, they’re in strong listening mode,” he says.
 
Kim Pearlstein's curator insight, March 22, 10:49 AM
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Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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5 Simple Hacks to Sharpen Your Emotional Intelligence

5 Simple Hacks to Sharpen Your Emotional Intelligence | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

We spend an awful lot of time in school throughout our lifetimes, diligently studying and cramming and writing exams, all in the quest to be more intelligent human beings.

 

How how much time do you spend on your emotional intelligence?

If you're like the average human being, the answer is probably: "Um, not much."

 

That's too bad, because according to researchers from Rutgers, there are 19 different ways emotional intelligence contributes to the bottom line in any work organization. Emotional intelligence guides our ability to deal with others; to understand their emotions, as well as our own.


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Personal Loans With Bad Credit's comment, February 18, 2016 6:02 AM
How can i hold that emotion when i know that are not become real .?
Willem Kuypers's curator insight, March 1, 2016 6:09 AM
Peut-être pas en lien direct, mais l'intelligence émotionelle est certainement importante pour les profs.
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Build Your Resilience: 5 Ways To Lean Into Life's Curves

Build Your Resilience: 5 Ways To Lean Into Life's Curves | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Life isn’t linear. No matter how well thought out your plans, they’ll eventually collide with a reality you didn’t plan on. Learning to "lean into the curves" when life doesn’t unfold as you’d hoped will help spare you untold stress, bounce back faster and emerge better off.  Here’s five ways to do just that.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 21, 6:30 PM

Life isn't linear. Sooner or later the best laid plans collide with a reality you didn't plan on. Learning to "lean into the curves" will help you handle them better and emerge better off.

Pamela Usukumah's curator insight, March 22, 1:19 PM
Nothing ever goes as planned, learning to roll with the punches can help you succeed.
Phyllis L Trower's curator insight, March 22, 2:41 PM
simple  necessary energizing
Rescooped by Roger Francis from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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People Won’t Grow If You Think They Can’t Change

People Won’t Grow If You Think They Can’t Change | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

Have you ever worked hard to improve a valuable skill and made real progress, only to have your development go unnoticed by the people who told you that you needed to improve? Perhaps this led you to look for a new job. Or maybe you’re a manager who’s been disappointed by poor performance and concluded that your low-performing employees are simply over-entitled? So you gave up on trying to help them improve and vented your frustration with colleagues behind closed doors.

Both of these commonplace experiences point to problems caused by a fixed mindset, in which we find it hard to believe that people can change. In the first scenario, an employee is judged as having low potential—and this assessment blinds leaders to the progress he’s made. In the second, the manager’s conviction that her employees will never change makes her less likely to engage in leadership behaviors that support development. The bottom line in both cases is that employees are less likely to reach their potential.


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whooptrip's curator insight, April 22, 2016 1:36 AM

good

pertinentapplied's comment, April 22, 2016 6:33 AM
Thats interesting...
Susanna Lavialle's curator insight, April 24, 2016 5:32 PM
Don't be blocked by your past experiences or other peoples' opinions or prejudices. You have the team and its your role to enable them. Give the person a target and the means, and organize the support to get there. With a real chance to make a difference, contribute to the common project goals and improve their skills they may very well succeed and surprise you.
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Fixing a Work Relationship Gone Sour

Fixing a Work Relationship Gone Sour | Learning At Work | Scoop.it

The good news is that even some of the most strained relationships can be repaired. In fact, a negative relationship turned positive can be a very strong one. “Going through difficult experiences can be the makings of the strongest, most resilient relationships,” says Susan David, a founder of the Harvard/McLean Institute of Coaching and author of the HBR article, “Emotional Agility.” The bad news is that fixing a relationship takes serious effort.

 

“Most people just lower their expectations because it’s easier than dealing with the real issues at hand,” says Brian Uzzi, professor of leadership and organizational change at Northwestern’s Kellogg School of Management and author of the HBR article, “Make Your Enemies Your Allies.” But, he says, the hard work is often worth it, especially in a work environment where productivity and performance are at stake. Here’s how to transform a work relationship that’s turned sour.


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The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 20, 2014 6:27 PM

Sometimes you get stuck in a rut with someone at work — a boss, a coworker, a direct report. Perhaps there’s bad blood between you or you simply haven’t been getting along. What can you do to turn the relationship around? Is it possible to start anew?