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LEARNING AND COGNITION
DESIGN OF EFFECTIVE LEARNING FOR THE BRAIN / MIND:
Thoughts and Research on Neuroeducation Science

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Is technology making things too easy?

Is technology making things too easy? | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it

Do you remember when you had to remember everything yourself? No?  Well, if you’ve forgotten those days, don’t worry, because they aren’t coming back.

 

If you’ve perfected your relationship with technology, then the memory on your smartphone means that you should never miss an appointment, lose someone’s contact details, or struggle to remember an important detail again. Mobile technology gives you perfect recall, freeing up your precious brainpower for other things.

 

But is all this advanced technology making things a little bit too easy? Is the fact that we almost always have an internet-connected device to hand making us lazy?

 

In a study conducted at Columbia University, subjects were asked to type facts and trivia into a computer. Half of the subjects were told that the information would be saved, while the other half were told it would be erased. The group who were told it would be erased were significantly more likely to remember the information.

 

In another test, they were asked to remember a trivia statement and which of five computer folders it was saved in on the computer; the subjects found it easier to recall the folder than the fact.

 

The researchers concluded that the internet has become a primary form of external or transactive memory. (Transactive memory is a kind of collective external memory – it used to be the ‘group mind’ of a family, group, or team, but is increasingly being replaced by the web itself; our collective recollections stored on the omnipresent cloud.)

 

 

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How Your Brain Connects the Future to the Past

How Your Brain Connects the Future to the Past | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it

We tend to think of memory as a way to revisit past experiences: a vacation in the tropics, a bad business decision, or where you might have put those elusive car keys. Neuroscientists have long believed that the brain's so-called episodic memory circuits are largely involved in remembering past events or occurrences. Neuroimaging studies had even identified parts of the brain that are specifically activated when retrieving information from prior life experiences. These include regions in the prefrontal and medial temporal lobes, as well as more posterior regions such as the retrosplenial cortex. But recent studies have found a striking overlap between these areas and brain regions that are activated when you think about the future.

 

In the business world, it's a distinct advantage to have a brain that anticipates future demands and negotiates them well. Accurate predictions typically translate to success. Being able to envision future scenarios helps foster strategic planning and resist immediate rewards in favor of longer-term gains. The proactive brain flexibly recombines details from past experiences that, by analogy with your current surroundings, help you make sense of where you are, anticipate what will come next, and successfully navigate the transition.

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IMPLICATIONS:  Review, Reinforcement, Memory Activation

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Two-dimensional learning: Viewing computer images causes long-term changes in nerve cell connections

Viewing two-dimensional images of the environment, as they occur in computer games, leads to sustained changes in the strength of nerve cell connections in the brain.
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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A better way to remember

Scientists and educators alike have long known that cramming is not an effective way to remember things.
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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Learning and remembering linked to holding material in hands, new research shows

New research shows that people's ability to learn and remember information depends on what they do with their hands while they are learning.
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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Digital Stress and Your Brain

Digital Stress and Your Brain | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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Training can improve memory and increase brain activity in mild cognitive impairment

Training can improve memory and increase brain activity in mild cognitive impairment | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it
If someone has trouble remembering where the car keys or the cheese grater are, new research shows that a memory training strategy can help.
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IMPLICATION:  Memory

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New brain connections form in clusters during learning

New brain connections form in clusters during learning | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it
New connections between brain cells emerge in clusters in the brain as animals learn to perform a new task, according to a new study. The findings reveal details of how brain circuits are rewired during the formation of new motor memories.
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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How the brain routes traffic for maximum alertness

How the brain routes traffic for maximum alertness | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it
A new study shows how the brain reconfigures its connections to minimize distractions and take best advantage of our knowledge of situations.
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IMPLICATION: Attention

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HowStuffWorks "Memory Encoding"

HowStuffWorks "Memory Encoding" | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it
Human memory is a complex, brain-wide process that is essential to who we are. Learn about encoding, the brain, and short- and long-term memory.
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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How beliefs shape effort and learning

If it was easy to learn, it will be easy to remember -- right? Psychological scientists have maintained that nearly everyone uses this simple rule to assess their own learning. Now a new study suggests otherwise.
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IMPLICATION: Schemas

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How the brain makes memories: Rhythmically

How the brain makes memories: Rhythmically | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it
The brain learns through changes in the strength of synapses -- the connections between neurons -- in response to stimuli. Now, researchers have found there is an optimal brain rhythm, or timing, for changing synaptic strength, and hence learning.
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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Memories serve as tools for learning and decision-making

People associate past memories with novel information, according to a new study. This memory-binding process allows people to better understand new concepts and make future decisions.
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Content Design

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Learning best when you rest: Sleeping after processing new info most effective

Learning best when you rest: Sleeping after processing new info most effective | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it
Nodding off in class may not be such a bad idea after all. New research shows that going to sleep shortly after learning new material is most beneficial for recall.
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Performance

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Doomed or Lucky? Predicting the Future of the Internet Generation

Doomed or Lucky? Predicting the Future of the Internet Generation | LEARNING AND COGNITION | Scoop.it
Looking into the proverbial crystal ball, a slew of technology experts weighed in on the Future of the Internet V survey conducted by Pew Research and Elon Un
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IMPLICATION:  Learning Performance

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