Learning about language differences in your neighbourhood - ES1
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Tongues of the World

Tongues of the World | Learning about language differences in your neighbourhood - ES1 | Scoop.it
Lyndsey Geer's insight:

This website is a guide to the major languages of world. This site was developed to inform people about the major languages of the world and their history and development. It can be used as a valuable guide for teachers, students, researchers and travellers for learning about the basic structure of each language, what sets them apart and its complex role in development of culture. The separate language pages all have links to infographics about that particular language.

 

As a teacher you could use this website as a source of information to learn more about the languages that are spoken in the neighbourhood where you teach. The inforgraphics can then be used to inform the students about the languages that are spoken in their neighbourhood. The first page of the infographics are just an overview of the language, this would be appropriate for ES1 as there isn’t too much information for them. The infographics could then be put up around the classroom so the information is always there and it can make it easier to compare similarities and differences between the languages that are spoken in their neighbourhood,which is an important part of the primary curriculum. Which can then further their ability to communicate effectively and sensitively within and across culture (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008).

 

 

 

Commonwealth of Australia. (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian Schools. Canberra, Australia: Author.

 

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World languages display banner (SB3073) - SparkleBox

World languages display banner (SB3073) - SparkleBox | Learning about language differences in your neighbourhood - ES1 | Scoop.it
Lyndsey Geer's insight:

On this site is the link to a number of downloadable banners, this one in particular says ‘world languages’ and is surrounded by the word ‘hello’ in a number of different languages from around the world. This has the ability to help students understand that people can say hello in a way that is different to English way that they are familiar with. This could be shown to students in your class and put on the classroom wall, this gives students easy access to the information and allows them recognise the differences between the languages.

 

If you wanted to teach students to differences between languages spoken in their own neighbourhood this could be used a template for your own class banner. You could have a class discussion about the different languages that are spoken in their neighbourhood. If you are teaching in a very multicultural area of Sydney like Parramatta or Cabramatta, then students may come up with a number of different languages that are spoken. The languages that you and the students identify can then be put on their own class language banner. You can read out loud the different ways to say ‘hello’ and get the students to repeat after you to try and reinforce their knowledge of the differences.

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Sam The Frog Virtual Book

Sam The Frog Virtual Book | Learning about language differences in your neighbourhood - ES1 | Scoop.it
Lyndsey Geer's insight:

On this site is the virtual version of the book “Sam the Frog (Bajuk)” by Mrs Irene Ryder. Irene Ryder is Gunggari Elder and developed this text to help teach the Gunggari language to children. The book has illustrations that were drawn by students and tells the story of a frog going on a journey to find his friend and on the way he runs into a number of other animals. The book gives the Gunggari name for the frog and all the animals that the frog runs into on his journey. This book could be read out aloud to a class to give them idea of some the words from this particular Aboriginal language and let them know that Aboriginal people speak a number of different languages. The book isn’t too word heavy so you may even be able to get the students to read along with the book in class, or just get them to read out the English and Gungarri words for the animals that the frog meets on his journey.


You may be able to assess a student’s knowledge of this by asking them to draw a picture of a particular animal from the book, and then you would ask them to write the English word for the animal and the Gunggari word for the animal. I think this task would be good for ES1 because it involves reading the students a story and then getting them represent something that they read about as a picture. I liked that the author’s students drew the illustrations in the book. I think if other students knew this they may be more excited to draw too. 

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Number Song in Chinese

Number Song in Chinese | Learning about language differences in your neighbourhood - ES1 | Scoop.it
This song teaches number 1-10. Sung to the familiar "Row row row your boat" tune, this song makes it very easy for children as young as three years old to
Lyndsey Geer's insight:

This is website has the link to the download of a song that can be used to help students learn how to count from 1 to 10 in Chinese. It is sung to the familiar “row row row your boat' tune and begins slowly to make it easier for young students to learn. The website also has a number of ways in which the song can be used in the classroom to help teachers.

 

The methods of singing that this site mentions have the ability to improve a students ability to sing the Chinese numbers and this in turn will help them learn about the recognisable differences in languages spoken in their neighbourhood. If you are teaching in multicultural area of Sydney like Parramatta or Cabramatta then you will definitely have some students that come from a Chinese family or know people that speak Chinese. If you are teaching students in ES1 to count than this song can be used as a comparison to the English numbers that they are learning. Being able to sing along to the song and knowing that the words that they are saying are also English number shows that students are able to recognise the differences between the languages. I wouldn't expect all students in ES1 to be able to write the Chinese numbers but you may be able to assess the level of student understanding by the way that they sing along in class.

 

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Afghan children's songs - YouTube

Two children's songs from Afghanistan
Lyndsey Geer's insight:

This is a video that plays two Afghan children’s songs sung in Dari. The video relates to the songs that are playing at the time and there are Dari subtitles and English subtitles down the bottom of the video. The first song is called Ali Baba and it about talks about animals and the noises that they make. This would be a great song for students in ES1 to sing as it doesn't have too many words and it talks about that things that most of them would recognise but just in a language that is different to English.

 

 The second video is an Afghan tale of a man that eats bread and then goes through the process of growing bread himself, which then he gives to his religious teacher who then gives him the Qu’ran in return. This is another good song for ES1 to help them recognise the different between languages and can also be used to inform students about where food comes from and different religions through song. I think the fact that are both the English and the Dari subtitles at the bottom of the video will especially help with this.

 

You can go on to talk with students about how people who speak a different language live in their neighbourhood. As a task you could get the students to sing along with these songs in English and maybe even getting them to say some familiar words in Dari. You might be able to gauge a student’s understanding by observing them as they sing along in class. 

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