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Get Your Students Moving

Get Your Students Moving | Learning 2gether | Scoop.it
As a 20-year veteran middle school teacher, I learned very early in my career that if you don’t physically move middle school students sometime during your lesson or class time, they will move you in ways you wish you could forget. Providing students an opportunity to move is critical to your survival, as well as to helping your students stay engaged throughout your lesson.
Brain research tells us that students can actively listen to their teachers for as many minutes as their age....
Nancy Jones's insight:

This may be old news, but a good reminder, especially as technology becomes more a part of the education experience. As teachers, we are moving around often ( although not always with as much energy). This is all an extension of the "all work , and not play" theory that has seem to taken over in some schools and households;(

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Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices

Energy and Calm: Brain Breaks and Focused-Attention Practices | Learning 2gether | Scoop.it
Here are some activities to stimulate your students' minds when they need a change, and to focus and calm them when they're just too stimulated.
Nancy Jones's insight:

Some clever and engaging activities for focus  as well as stimulation worth investigating.

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What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains

What Kids Should Know About Their Own Brains | Learning 2gether | Scoop.it
Getty Neuroscience may seem like an advanced subject of study, perhaps best reserved for college or even graduate school. Two researchers from Temple
Nancy Jones's insight:

We learn more and more about the brain on a daily basis. We should be guiding our learners to the same information especially as the digital world is changing the way we ":wire" on a daily basis.

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Brain Research: Adolescents Learn More in Cooperative Groups | MiddleWeb

Brain Research: Adolescents Learn More in Cooperative Groups | MiddleWeb | Learning 2gether | Scoop.it
Judy Willis, a neurologist & middle grades teacher, says adolescent brains learn more through interactive, interdependent group work.

Did you know that "peer group influence plays an important developmental role in the psychosocial process of separation from parents"? What does this mean to teachers of middle school students? That "interactive, interdependent group work" helps middle school students "build happy, learning brains."

This post will help you learn more about brain science, successful group work, how to plan for success, provides some researched-based guidelines and more.


Via Beth Dichter, Nancy Jones
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Ruth Virginia Barton's curator insight, February 13, 2015 11:08 AM

Supportive middle school teaching strategies like cooperative learning, class celebrations, and community-school collaborations lower stress and increase resilience in students and create HAPPY MIDDLE-SCHOOL BRAINS, neuro-imaging shows.

Dennis T OConnor's curator insight, July 21, 2015 2:45 PM

This site was recommended by Ruth Burton.  I taught middle school for 15 years and the insights found here make great sense to me. 

Ana María Hurtado's curator insight, August 14, 2015 8:16 AM

Of course, they do! 

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10 Smart Study Tactics That Support How The Brain Actually Works

10 Smart Study Tactics That Support How The Brain Actually Works | Learning 2gether | Scoop.it
Here's the problem with what I'm about to tell you: these tactics may may be news to you, but in psychology circles most of them have been around for dec

Via Beth Dichter
Nancy Jones's insight:

Who is teaching this to our students?  I think that is the question. some great tips and throughtful explanations as well.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, March 22, 2015 11:25 AM

Do our learners know how to study? Perhaps a better question is do we understand the research that shows successful ways to study have been known for decades, but our current learning environment is not necessarily conducive to these learning habits. T

This post shares ten strategies for studying, as well as providing links to additional resources. It ends with a short discussion on why we may not be seeing these strategies used.
Four strategies are listed below. Click through to the post for additional information.

* Study to learn, not to "know." Knowing means we may know an answer, but not truly understand what is being discussed.

* Imagine you'll be teaching someone else. Research is showing that the expectation that you will need to teach material to others tends to use more effective learning strategies.

* Separate process from progress. Does learning end? Do we make progress but continue in the process?

* Space out your study sessions over time. Brain research shows that cramming is not effective.

There are many insights in this post that you may want to share with your students and colleagues.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, March 23, 2015 1:36 PM

Some good reminders and a great question. Who teaches the kids how to make the optimum use of this information?

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Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain

Scientists Say Child's Play Helps Build A Better Brain | Learning 2gether | Scoop.it

"When it comes to brain development, time in the classroom may be less important than time on the playground.

'The experience of play changes the connections of the neurons at the front end of your brain,' says , a researcher at the University of Lethbridge in Alberta, Canada. 'And without play experience, those neurons aren't changed,' he says."


Via Beth Dichter
Nancy Jones's insight:

Not just young kids, all kids! Studies indicate that the prefrontal cortex isn't fully developed until mid -20's for some. Really confirms the adage, "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy."

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, August 9, 2014 8:01 PM

Allowing young students free play time is important since it helps set up the prefrontal cortex (where executive functioning is located) to set up neuron pathways that help students to solve problems, make plans and regulate emotions. However, more and more schools are taking time away from recess, to focus on Common Core subjects.

It is critical that this is free play. The post states "No coaches, no umpires, no rule books."

Does your school have a policy about recess? Are students allowed to choose what to do, or are they given choices? This post shares insights that you may want to share with your PTO as well as others whom work in your school.

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Harvard Wants to Know: How Does the Act of Making Shape Kids’ Brains?

Harvard Wants to Know: How Does the Act of Making Shape Kids’ Brains? | Learning 2gether | Scoop.it
A group of Harvard researchers is teaming up with schools in Oakland, Calif. to explore how kids learn through making. Through an initiative called Project Ze
Nancy Jones's insight:

“It’s not a lesson plan; it’s not a curriculum; it’s a way to look at the world.”

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, February 20, 2014 7:43 PM

It is important for children to see their learning appear in a tangible form.