Leading Schools
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Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
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How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn

How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Psychologists are finding that when students are motivated by a desire to have a positive impact on the world they are more able to plug away at challenging or
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How A Simple List Can Improve Behavior

How A Simple List Can Improve Behavior | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
But this 30-45 second strategy has a way of focusing students on their future performance. It makes them more mindful of what is expected the next time the same moment comes up—and without feeling as if you’re nagging, pressuring, or forcing it upon them.
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The Learning Styles myth debunked on the back of an envelope

The Learning Styles myth debunked on the back of an envelope | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
“You don’t have to believe in learning styles theories to appreciate differences among kids, to hold an egalitarian attitude in the midst of such differences, and to try to foster such attitudes in students.” Daniel Willingham, Learning Styles FAQ The Learning Styles myth, for those that aren’t already clear, is that by aligning teaching to
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Study: Classroom-Management Fixes Work Best When Addressing Social-Emotional Needs

Study: Classroom-Management Fixes Work Best When Addressing Social-Emotional Needs | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Parsing through studies of 54 interventions at the primary school level, researchers from the University of Groningen, in the Netherlands, examined four different methods for improving classroom management.
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Do We Really Need Lesson Plans?

Do We Really Need Lesson Plans? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Should teachers have to plan one-off lessons using lesson planning templates? I don’t want to use lessons plans, but that does not mean we all need to ignore
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Students Can Learn New Skills Twice as Fast

Students Can Learn New Skills Twice as Fast | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Learning a sport or instrument? A new study says this subtle change to how you practice will help you improve twice as fast.


"Interleaving" is a research-validated approach to practice that says shaking things up and working on a variety of related skills can greatly speed your learning. For instance, in one study math students who used the technique saw benefits, according to one study. "On a test one day later, the students who'd been using the interleaving method did 25 percent better. But when tested a month later, the interleaving method [users] did 76 percent better," PsyBlog reported.

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Leaders In High-Performing Schools Focus On What They Can Control

Leaders In High-Performing Schools Focus On What They Can Control | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
There’s an unfortunate myth in education discussions today that criticizes outside organizations and the national government for removing autonomy from local school systems.

Make no mistake: Schools lead the education of the students. Yes, many years of initiatives brought on by No Child Left Behind and Race to the Top have affected schools’ priorities and cultures, often negatively. Many worry that these changes, such as the focus on high-stakes testing, are a disservice to our keiki.

But this wave of recent criticism does not match my experiences. We did not lose autonomy or the opportunity to meet the needs of our students. What we lost, perhaps, was the belief in our empowerment to take advantage of those opportunities.
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Stop Humiliating Teachers...by blaming them for every social or economic problem

Stop Humiliating Teachers...by blaming them for every social or economic problem | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
David Denby writes about the unfair blame laid on public-school teachers.


"Everyone celebrates his or her personal memory of individual teachers, yet, as a culture, we snap at the run-down heels of the profession. The education reporter Dana Goldstein, in her book “The Teacher Wars,” published in 2014, looks at American history and describes a recurring situation of what she calls “moral panic”—the tendency, when there’s an economic or social crisis, to lay blame on public-school teachers. They must have created the crisis, the logic goes, by failing to educate the young."

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Do We Really Have High Expectations for All? - Barbara Blackburn

Do We Really Have High Expectations for All? - Barbara Blackburn | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Robert Marzano has spent decades researching effective teaching practice. He and others have found that when we have high expectations, we treat students differently. When questioning students, we call on them more often, ask more challenging questions, provide more wait time, and probe for additional information.
Mel Riddile's insight:

"Robert Marzano has spent decades researching effective teaching practice. He and others have found that when we have high expectations, we treat students differently. When questioning students, we call on them more often, ask more challenging questions, provide more wait time, and probe for additional information."

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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, February 12, 2016 10:27 AM

Excellent way to self-check. Are you holding high expectations for your students? Engage all and they will reach higher with you.

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Chunking Improves Teaching and Learning

Chunking Improves Teaching and Learning | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
What Is Chunking?

Look at this sequence of numbers: 2, 4, 7, 8, 6, 5, 9, 0, 8, 7. 

Now close your eyes and repeat them out loud. How many did you remember? Did you get them all right? If you are like most people, you probably were not able to remember those 10 random numbers after only looking at them for a second or two. Remembering 10 digits is not impossible, however. Actually, most of us do it all the time. 

So, how can our brain make the transition from a string of 10 random digits to something that we can repeat back with ease? Sometimes, without even realizing it, we use a short-term memory strategy called chunking

Chunking is one way to make remembering relatively lengthy strings of information a little bit easier. It is particularly useful when we only need to remember something for a short period of time. As its name implies, chunking involves taking long strings of information like numbers or letters and grouping (or chunking) them into smaller, more manageable bits of information. So, if you broke that 10 digit string down into smaller chunks, you would only have to remember 2 groups of 3 digits and one group of 4 digits. This method is much easier than remembering a long string of 10 digits.

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Acting Ed. Secretary calls for 'reset' saying Educators 'unfairly blamed' for schools' challenges

Acting Ed. Secretary calls for 'reset' saying Educators 'unfairly blamed' for schools' challenges | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
In his first major speech last month, John King apologized to the nation’s teachers.
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Are You a Leader, or Just Pretending to Be One?

Are You a Leader, or Just Pretending to Be One? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
When leaders empower people through a higher purpose, they don’t have to “create buy-in” or use other marketing tactics to win over their followers. Leaders who do find themselves acting something like a pusher — resorting to perks, tit-for-tats, and bonuses — might want to ask themselves if they’re missing some larger point. A leader isn’t a salesman. When Steve Jobs asked John Sculley his famous question, “Do you really want to spend your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?” he was making just such a distinction. Selling sugared water might make you a few bucks — but only at the cost of doing something that matters. The purpose of a leader is to create a purpose.
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Should How Teachers Develop ‘Grit' and ‘Growth Mindset’ Be Better Reflected in Teacher Evaluations?

Should How Teachers Develop ‘Grit' and ‘Growth Mindset’ Be Better Reflected in Teacher Evaluations? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
New research from Brown University delves into the concept of teacher evaluations being judged on non-cognitive achievement as well as more achievement based on test scores.
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ESED trying to undue damage by backing off attacks on teachers and principals

ESED trying to undue damage by backing off attacks on teachers and principals | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Obama’s nominee for education secretary has apologized for a climate in which teachers feel “attacked and unfairly blamed.”
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Strategies to Ensure Introverted Students Feel Valued at School

Strategies to Ensure Introverted Students Feel Valued at School | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new book looks inside the minds of introverted kids and teens, with lessons for schools on class participation, groupthink and public speaking.
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Is Immediate Feedback Always Best?

Is Immediate Feedback Always Best? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Tuesday, February 16th
8:10am: Class starts in five minutes and Emma is double checking her problem set before handing it in. Worried she might be called on by the teacher, Emma spent over an hour last night working through the equation. She feels confident, her phone chirps to remind her cla
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Connections, Not Consequences

Connections, Not Consequences | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
For individual student behavior issues, rely less on consequences and more on personal connections, scaffolding your process with dialogue, negotiation, and ultimately agreement.
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Why Do Teachers Need Instructional Coaches?

Why Do Teachers Need Instructional Coaches? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Working with an instructional coach doesn't mean that teachers are weak, it actually shows how strong they are because they believe they can always get better.
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30 Questions from Principal Interviews (Plus More)

30 Questions from Principal Interviews (Plus More) | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Guest post by William D. Parker Each year, I partner with other school leaders through our state principal association to work with aspiring principals or new principals as they begin their journey…
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Gino Bondi's curator insight, February 14, 2016 8:07 PM

not only the questions but also included are tips for interviewing - nice post to clip and save for the future

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Stop Trying To Do It All! 3 Things That Really Matter in Every Lesson

Stop Trying To Do It All! 3 Things That Really Matter in Every Lesson | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
“GIVE YOURSELF PERMISSION TO STOP TRYING TO DO IT ALL [AND] MAKE YOUR HIGHEST CONTRIBUTION TOWARDS THE THINGS THAT REALLY MATTER”
Mel Riddile's insight:
  1. Read
  2. Discuss
  3. Write
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Chunking: Helping Students Process Information

Chunking: Helping Students Process Information | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Five Avenues to Understanding

To help students process information that is essential to understanding specific content, teachers can use an effective strategy that involves the following five elements.

Chunking

Chunking means presenting new information in small, digestible bites. This requires carefully examining the manner in which students will experience new content. If the teacher intends to present content in the form of a lecture, he or she needs to determine the crucial points at which to pause so students can interact with one another about the new information.

For example, for a lecture on the topic of theoretical probability, the teacher might decide to make her first stop after she has discussed some basic differences between theoretical and experimental probability. If she's using a videotape or a video clip she's downloaded from the Internet, she might decide to stop the video about two minutes into the discussion of how theoretical probability is used in games of chance. This idea of stopping so that students can digest the information also holds true for demonstrations, exhibitions, guest speakers, reading content in a textbook, and the like.

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RefME's curator insight, February 12, 2016 7:36 AM

Top Study Tip: take 'chunking' and apply it to your own studies with the Pomodoro technique.

Penny Christensen's curator insight, February 16, 2016 6:49 AM

Essential for #BlendedLearning and online classrooms that teachers learn how to do this.

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Methods That Improve Teaching Common-Core Math Don't Help in English

Methods That Improve Teaching Common-Core Math Don't Help in English | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The Common Core State Standards have fostered many instructional changes in American classrooms, but new research offers little advice about what strategies improve how that instruction is delivered.
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What We Should Know About Teens

What We Should Know About Teens | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Parents and educators can become more aware of ways into the hearts and minds of teens that can make a difference.
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Why New Teachers Burnout, and What to Do about It

Why New Teachers Burnout, and What to Do about It | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Does this sound like any new teachers you know? Hi Friends, I am suffering this semester. I feel like I’m treading water and just barely surviving until Spring Break. I’m exhausted from…
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