Leading Schools
61.0K views | +28 today
Follow
 
Scooped by Mel Riddile
onto Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

'Myths & Lies' That Threaten Our Schools

'Myths & Lies' That Threaten Our Schools | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
David C. Berliner and Gene V. Glass answer a few questions about their book, "50 Myths & Lies That Threaten America's Public Schools."
Mel Riddile's insight:

"Some of our schools do not do well, but it is a bald face lie to say America's schools in general do poorly."

more...
No comment yet.
Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


more...
Beth Crisafulli Hofer's comment, January 10, 11:54 PM
I'm going to add some of these to our framework!
LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 10:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Chardon High School's curator insight, March 21, 3:34 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Teachers, Stop Turning Your Lights Out! The Right Lighting May Improve Learning In Classrooms

Teachers, Stop Turning Your Lights Out! The Right Lighting May Improve Learning In Classrooms | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new study reveals what kind of lighting may best support academic performance.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Only A Fraction Of Students Are Prepared For College When They Leave High School

Only A Fraction Of Students Are Prepared For College When They Leave High School | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
... and that's really sad.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

The #1 Factor That Determines A Toxic or Thriving School Culture

The #1 Factor That Determines A Toxic or Thriving School Culture | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
When it comes to the success of an individual classroom, nothing is more important than the relationship between the teacher and the students. When it comes to the success of an entire school, nothing is more important than the relationship of the adults in the building.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Stop telling kids you’re bad at math. You are spreading math anxiety ‘like a virus.’

Stop telling kids you’re bad at math. You are spreading math anxiety ‘like a virus.’ | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Why do smart people enjoy saying that they are bad at math?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

'We should recognise that good teachers don’t all teach in the same way'

'We should recognise that good teachers don’t all teach in the same way' | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A head of humanities shares his experiences of being observed as a NQT and explains why we should not be judging all lessons by the same criteria
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Searching for Clarity on Formative Assessment

Searching for Clarity on Formative Assessment | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Ask five teachers what formative assessment is and you're likely to get five different definitions.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Deepen Reflection, Deepen Learning:  Writing

Deepen Reflection, Deepen Learning:  Writing | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Teachers can learn a lot from asking students to reflect and self-assess against the standards and we do the students and ourselves a disservice by not making it an expectation. Perhaps writing a reflection like this isn't appropriate for every class, maybe a video or voice recording would be better. Know your students and differentiate and scaffold reflections to best suit their individual needs.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Race and the Standardized Testing Wars

Race and the Standardized Testing Wars | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A growing number of minority parents and educators are joining the anti-testing movement.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Students' social media activity monitored for dangerous or criminal behavior including cyberbullying

Students' social media activity monitored for dangerous or criminal behavior including cyberbullying | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Orlando public school system uses monitoring software to check for cyberbullying, suicide threats or criminal activity.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Embracing Failure as a Necessary Part of Deeper Learning

Embracing Failure as a Necessary Part of Deeper Learning | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
By: Loretta Goodwin - As part of the process of creating innovative and deeper learning environments for students, embracing failure is necessary.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Charlotte Danielson on Rethinking Teacher Evaluation

I'm deeply troubled by the transformation of teaching from a complex profession requiring nuanced judgment to the performance of certain behaviors that can be ticked off on a checklist. In fact, I (and many others in the academic and policy communities) believe it's time for a major rethinking of how we structure teacher evaluation to ensure that teachers, as professionals, can benefit from numerous opportunities to continually refine their craft.


Charlotte Danielson

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What are teachers' knowledge and perceptions of state standards?

What are teachers' knowledge and perceptions of state standards? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new RAND Corporation survey of American teachers provides several key areas where states and school districts can do more to help teachers engage in instruction that will most help students meet sta..
Mel Riddile's insight:

the dominant reading materials English teachers report using for their instruction are leveled readers, which are texts written at students' individual reading levels rather than students' grade level. The Common Core State Standards, in contrast, emphasize use of complex and grade-level texts with all students. Use of leveled readers was especially high among teachers with higher populations of English-language learners — those for whom English is not their first language — in their classrooms and higher numbers of students who receive free and reduced-price lunches.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Teaching teachers how to teach reading

Teaching teachers how to teach reading | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A program by Teaching Matters in New York brings early reading instruction to teachers in high-need schools to train them in the art of teaching reading.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

This Woman Is Leading The Charge To Start School Later

This Woman Is Leading The Charge To Start School Later | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
"The vast majority of U.S. teenagers cannot get enough sleep with current school hours."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Career education making a comeback in US high schools

Career education making a comeback in US high schools | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Decades after "shop class" became known as a lesser alternative for children deemed unfit for college, vocational education is making a comeback in many of the nation's high schools. States such as California, Colorado and Louisiana are looking to rebranded "career pathways" that combine technical training with academics built around an industry theme as a way to get more young people to pursue some post-secondary education — whether it's a certificate from a two-year school or a four-year degree.
Supporters of the renaissance hope it will keep students engaged and prepare them for the stable, middle-income jobs employers say they can't fill.
"Career and technical education is really the perfect blend of the academic, the technical and the employability skills. Students come out college- and career-ready because they have the skills in all these essential areas," Association for Career and Technical Education Executive Director LeeAnn Wilson said.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Most High School Seniors Aren't College Or Career Ready, Says 'Nation's Report Card'

Most High School Seniors Aren't College Or Career Ready, Says 'Nation's Report Card' | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The latest reading and math scores of 12th-graders nationwide are out today. Here's a closer look.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

U.S. high school seniors slip in math and show no improvement in reading

U.S. high school seniors slip in math and show no improvement in reading | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

37 percent of seniors are academically prepared for college course­work in math and reading"

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies

Comparing Paper-Pencil and Computer Test Scores: 7 Key Research Studies | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
New evidence of a "mode effect" on 2014-15 PARCC exams prompts a fresh look at research on the comparability of computer- and paper-based assessments.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

We Aren't Using Assessments Correctly

We Aren't Using Assessments Correctly | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Testing data should be used as a tool to enhance instruction and learning for teachers and students, writes John Hattie.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Use Text Sets to Spark Unstoppable Learning

Use Text Sets to Spark Unstoppable Learning | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Thematic text sets can tap into the social worlds & narrative driven lives of adolescents to spark unstoppable learning, say educators Katie & Chris Cunningham
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Texas Teachers Union Sues to Block New Evaluation System

Texas Teachers Union Sues to Block New Evaluation System | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The union contends that the system, which would have districts base at least 20 percent of a teacher's score on "student growth measures," violates a state law that requires that educators' evaluations be based exclusively on "observable, job-related behavior."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

At schools with sub-par Internet, kids face a poor connection with modern life

At schools with sub-par Internet, kids face a poor connection with modern life | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The financial decisions of telecom companies have put rural students at a disadvantage.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

6 Ways to Help Students Understand Math

6 Ways to Help Students Understand Math | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Help students better understand math by presenting multiple examples, encouraging collaboration on alternative solutions, and framing the class with a clear agenda and effective summary.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

“Resetting” Classroom Management

“Resetting” Classroom Management | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Behavior in one of my large classes recently took a major turn for the worse. And I was not happy about it. It was taking me a long time to get the class quiet when I spoke. During a class discussi…
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 22, 5:46 PM
I found that communicating with students was important. Setting aside time each day to listen and talk with students, was part of the plan.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Do kids really take state test seriously?: The standardized testing problem no one talks about

Do kids really take state test seriously?: The standardized testing problem no one talks about | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
All the data, all the analysis of the data, all the conclusions based on the data -- all of that starts with the assumption that the students who took the Big Standardized Test actually tried. What if they didn't?
Mel Riddile's insight:

Two decades of experience with high-stakes testing have taught me that only if students are held accountable and receive timely feedback on the results of state tests will they take those tests seriously.

more...
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, April 19, 2:20 PM
Important consideration when talking about engaging students. Do they take our standardized testing seriously? And if not, how can we be sure they are doing their best?