Leading Schools
Follow
Find
37.4K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Mel Riddile
onto Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

Carol Dweck on Performance Assessment

Carol Dweck on Performance Assessment | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
When students have a growth mindset they are motivated to learn. Watch as psychologist Carol Dweck describes the growth mindset and ways to nurture it. Ms. Dweck references the Envision Education videos on Deeper Learning.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Growth Mindsets:

  1. Contribute to the motivation to learn
  2. Encourage students to embrace challenges not avoid them
  3. Develop self-discipline and perseverance
  4. We believe in you! Set high standards and assure students that we will support them in achieving those standards. We set very high standards but we are committed to helping you reach and exceed them (support)
  5. Send the message that "you can join the ranks of the 'best and brightest' through work and effort on challenging tasks
  6. Encourage students to take 'ownership', which is a critical factor
  7. When students make choices and have a big 'why' their motivation increases
  8. Ikea Effect - the longer students work on a challenge, the more committed they are to the project
  9. Help students understand that intelligence is not something you were born with, but something you create
  10. Continual growth and improvement over time is the central focus of learning
  11. Help students understand that they can contribute
  12. Cause students to believe that they belong here


more...
No comment yet.
Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student

Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Our toolkit for educators includes videos, case studies and more that lead you to a forum for equity, personalization, smart data, collaboration and continuous improvement...
more...
Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, July 3, 9:53 AM

NASSP sponsored tools for success. Take a look at the many resources for new and experienced leaders alike.

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

More unqualified teachers assigned to schools serving poor and minority students

More unqualified teachers assigned to schools serving poor and minority students | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

A Look Inside the Classroom of the Future

A Look Inside the Classroom of the Future | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
To educate students for 21st-century careers, educators should be using real-world case studies, embracing complexity, practicing empathy, integrating technology, and encouraging reflection.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Carol Dweck: The power of believing that you can improve - YouTube

Published on Dec 17, 2014
Carol Dweck researches “growth mindset” — the idea that we can grow our brain's capacity to learn and to solve problems. In this talk, she describes two ways to think about a problem that’s slightly too hard for you to solve. Are you not smart enough to solve it … or have you just not solved it yet? A great introduction to this influential field.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world's leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes (or less). Look for talks on Technology, Entertainment and Design -- plus science, business, global issues, the arts and much more.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Instructional Leader or Building Manager?

Instructional Leader or Building Manager? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

By Justin Baeder

"Faced with this question, most of us know the “correct” answer (especially in a job interview): instructional leader, of course.

But do we really have a choice? Can you choose to be an instructional leader and not a building manager?


Instructional leadership involves creating the conditions for instruction, not just directly supervising it."

Mel Riddile's insight:

Instructional Quality is a function of the following:

  1. Teacher Skill
  2. Student Readiness
  3. Context


Leaders can work to improve teacher skills, but if they neglect the context, no learning will take place. Attendance impacts teachers. Behavior impacts teaching and learning. Unless school leaders create a safe, orderly, and inviting school environment, and provide the resources teachers need, learning will not take place.

As one national leader said to me 'We did a great job teaching our principals to work with teachers, but we forgot to teach them how to prevent fires in the bathrooms.'

Principals have to work on the three factors--teacher skill, student readiness, and context--all at once.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mel Riddile from MASSP News
Scoop.it!

Leadership is about Relationships not Efficiency

Leadership is about Relationships not Efficiency | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

"while efficiency is critical and often a competitive advantage, it is a problem when it becomes a mindset that is applied to everything we do; when it becomes an excuse for our lack of real connection. Faster and easier is not always better. As leaders, we have to know the difference. Some things are better over time. There is no such thing as efficient leadership. If efficiency is digital, leadership is analog

Leadership is about influence and mobilizing people to achieve a common goal. This is done through relationships. Relationships do not benefit from efficiency."


Via Anne Leong, Ivon Prefontaine, Dean J. Fusto, Nancy J. Herr, Missouri Secondary Principals
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 11, 10:04 PM

I am reading Habermas and this fits with what he speculated. Efficiency is not problematic per se, but it is when the focus is exclusively on efficiency.

 

ehd1@shaw.ca

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, December 11, 11:42 PM

effectiveness or people focus (getting the right things done by others) trumps any day efficiency or task focus (doing things in right way for maximum production/ RoI). 

Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, December 16, 9:46 PM

Leadership is so much more than getting things done quickly. 

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Too many teachers rated effective in new evaluations?

Too many teachers rated effective in new evaluations? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The system was created to make it easier to identify which teachers performed the best so their methods could be replicated, and which performed the worst, so they could be fired.


Most New York City Teachers Score Well On New Assessments.

The New York Times (12/17, Taylor, Subscription Publication) reports that New York education officials released new information Tuesday showing that 90% of “New York City teachers received one of the top two rankings in the first year of a new evaluation system that was hailed as a better way of assessing how they perform.” Noting that the system was envisioned as a way to identify successful teachers’ best practices and to eliminate ineffective teachers, the Times reports that “state officials and education experts said the city appeared to be doing a better job of evaluating its teachers than the rest of New York State.”

        The AP (12/17, Thompson) reports that some education leaders said that the high pass rate of the evaluations may mean that it needs to be improved, noting that this is “the second consecutive year that evaluations gave high scores to the vast majority of teachers while only about a third of students” scored well on statewide tests. Board of Regents Chancellor Merryl Tisch said, “The ratings show there’s much more work to do to strengthen the evaluation system.” Meanwhile, the AP quotes outgoing Education Commissioner John King Jr. saying, “I’m concerned that in some districts, there’s a tendency to blanket everyone with the same rating. That defeats the purpose of the observations and the evaluations, and we have to work to fix that.”

        The Syracuse (NY) Post-Standard (12/17) and the Wall Street Journal (12/17, Brody, Subscription Publication) run similar reports.

Mel Riddile's insight:

The education world has turned completely upside down!

  • New teacher evaluation systems are designed to make it easier to fire teachers, not to improve teaching.
  • Can we fire our way to Finland? The same reformers who promoted small schools and larger class sizes have championed the idea that firing more teachers would somehow improve public education. Now, “school systems are stuck with a model designed to trash teachers, while Microsoft employees collaborate and work on teams.” http://www.vanityfair.com/online/daily/2012/07/microsoft-downfall-emails-steve-ballmer
  • The criticism of inflated teacher evaluations centers around the use of value-added measures in calculating final ratings—evaluations have improved while scores have dropped. Read NASSP’s position statement on the use of VAM’s in teacher evalutions. http://www.nassp.org/tabid/3788/default.aspx?topic=Value_Added_Measures_in_Teacher_Evaluation
  • NYC is better at evaluating teachers because NYC has more ineffective teachers?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Who Gets to Graduate?

Who Gets to Graduate? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
  1. More than 40 percent of American students who start at four-year colleges haven’t earned a degree after six years. If you include community-college students in the tabulation, the dropout rate is more than half, worse than any other country except Hungary.
  2. Rich kids graduate; poor and working-class kids don’t. Or to put it more statistically: About a quarter of college freshmen born into the bottom half of the income distribution will manage to collect a bachelor’s degree by age 24, while almost 90 percent of freshmen born into families in the top income quartile will go on to finish their degree."
  3. If you compare college students with the same standardized-test scores who come from different family backgrounds, you find that their educational outcomes reflect their parents’ income, not their test scores.
Mel Riddile's insight:

I don't often use the term 'must read', but this article fills the bill.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Vocabulary: It pays to increase your word power

Vocabulary: It pays to increase your word power | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Education for upward mobility starts with building low-income students’ vocabulary.


by Robert Pondiscio


To grow up as the child of well-educated parents in an affluent American home is to hit the verbal lottery. From their earliest days, these children reap the benefits of parents who speak in complete sentences, engage them in rich dinner table conversation, and read them to sleep at bedtime. Verbal parents chatter incessantly, offering a running commentary on vegetable options in the produce aisle, pointing out letters and words in storefronts and street signs. Parents proceed, as Ginia Bellafante of the New York Times once put it, “in a near constant mode of annotation.”

more...
Carla Kessler's curator insight, December 18, 12:21 AM

A well designed article that explains why the "language-rich get richer, and the poor get poorer." It reminds us that memorization of words does not help our kids.


"The sweet spot for vocabulary growth and language proficiency are tier-two words, which occur in a variety of domains. Words like verify, superior, and negligent are common to sophisticated adult speech and reading; we perceive them as ordinary, not specialized language. Tier-two words are essential to reading comprehension and undergird more subtle and precise use of language, both receptive (reading, hearing) and expressive (writing, speaking).


Consider how a child might come to encounter the tier-two word “durable.” She would need multiple exposures to the word—not memorization."

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

"half of first and second graders feel moderate to severe math anxiety"

"half of first and second graders feel moderate to severe math anxiety" | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

RCEd Commentary
by Dan Willingham


Math anxiety means, unsurprisingly, that one feels tension and apprehension in situations involving math. What is surprising is the frequency of the problem, and the young age at which it can start. Fully half of first and second graders feel moderate to severe math anxiety. And many children do not outgrow it; about 25 percent of students attending a four-year college suffer from math anxiety. Among community college students, the figure is 80 percent.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

"terror is just not a very good strategy for professional development"

"terror is just not a very good strategy for professional development" | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Moving to a focus on evidence-based reform will not solve all of the contentious issues about accountability, but it could help us focus the reform conversation on how to move forward the top 95% of teachers and schools -- the ones who teach 95% of o...
more...
Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, December 12, 7:46 PM

Tests are only one small way of gathering data. Teacher observations and experiences are a larger source.

 

@ivon_ehd1

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

States aim for less testing and more instruction

States aim for less testing and more instruction | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Yet another state tries to hammer out a new way of judging schools that doesn't rely so heavily on test scores.


Connecticut Joins States Preparing New Accountability Measures.

In a blog for Education Week (12/12) Catherine Gewertz writes that Connecticut is adding civics, arts, physical fitness, college readiness, attendance, and “student persistence and personal development” to its current list of criteria, primarily math and English/language arts scores, used to measure school effectiveness. Connecticut is preparing to present the system to the US Department of Education as part of its No Child Left Behind waiver renewal in the hopes of implementing the standards in June, and is one of a dozen states preparing new accountability measures. Education Commissioner Stefan Pryor told the state board the plan is to “aim for less testing and more instruction in our schools.” State efforts to incorporate more difficult to measure benchmarks are in many cases still in the early stages, and the author suggests watching those efforts over the next year.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

How Your State of Mind Affects Your Performance - HBR

How Your State of Mind Affects Your Performance - HBR | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Ways to move from frustrated to energized.


Of the 18 states of mind in the chart, it came as no surprise that 94% of respondents reported that Calm, Happy and Energized (CHE) are the three that drive the greatest levels of effectiveness and performance. As Giglio Del Borgo, a country manager at Experian explains: “If you are energized, without being necessarily too excited about things or euphoric, that energy will transmit into the people working around you.”

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mel Riddile from Headlines for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

To some principals, rise of superintendents signals decline of networks

To some principals, rise of superintendents signals decline of networks | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

As Chancellor Carmen Fariña re-empowers superintendents, many principals believe this means that school-support networks are on the way out.


Via Bob Farrace
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Summer school seems to work better for math than for reading

Summer school seems to work better for math than for reading | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Summer school shows mixed results to combat summer learning loss
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

11 Best Education-Related Videos of 2014

11 Best Education-Related Videos of 2014 | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Jackie Gerstein


I love end of year “best of” lists.  My own list is what I found to be the most powerful education related videos of 2014. They all, in some way, address the mind, heart, and spirit of education.  ...


They range from just over three minutes to about seventeen minutes. Below is  a list of the videos.

* Malala Yousuf Nobel Prize Speech

* Carol Dweck: The Power of Believing You Can Improve

* Sir Ken Robinson: Can Creativity Be Taught

* President Obama on the Whitehouse Maker Faire

* Toxic Culture of Education: Joshua Katz

* The necessity of the student voice | Catherine Zhang

* Rethinking Learning in the Digital Age – Mitchel Resnick 

* If I Knew Then: A Letter to Me on My First Day Teaching

* Kid President Throws a Surprise Party for a Retiring Teacher 

* Erzah French: Sportskid of the Year

* Malcolm Mitchell Book Club

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Do you have a vision of great teaching for your school?

Do you have a vision of great teaching for your school? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

By Doug Lemov


"Go and find a way to assess what great teaching is for your school or your city or your nation, make it as rigorous and objective as you can and then and then identify your best, study them and set out to replicate what they do."

Mel Riddile's insight:

Questions for school leaders who want to be referred to as instructional leaders:

  1. Do you have a school wide instructional framework?
  2. Do you have a common language around teaching and learning?
  3. Have you defined what good teaching looks like?
  4. Do you have a set of defined instructional practices?
  5. Are your expectations crystal clear to all teachers?
  6. Are expectations for students consistent in every classroom throughout the school?
  7. Do you consistently monitor and provide feedback to teachers?
  8. Have you identified your "bright spots?"
  9. Are your teachers leading professional development?
  10. Are teachers working 'together' or seperately?


more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Stop Talking About Balance! It's a Faulty Metaphor ~ CCL

Stop Talking About Balance! It's a Faulty Metaphor ~ CCL | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

If Work/Life is a hot topic (or pressure point) for employees in your organization, resolve to change the conversation in 2015. First, stop talking about balance.


"Balance is a faulty metaphor, using a trade-off mentality to describe work and non-work time." 

"Our research suggests that boundaries are more important than balance — and give us a more dynamic, realistic and personalized image to work with," Ruderman continues.

more...
Rhana Pytell Kozak's curator insight, December 19, 4:01 PM

Ultimately the boundary between work and play becomes blurry. Without that quality clear boundaries are absolutely necessary to prevent burnout. 

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Supporting Student Engagement by 'Building Community'

Supporting Student Engagement by 'Building Community' | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
This final installment in my four-part series on student engagement includes guest responses from Jennifer Fredricks, Aubrie Rojee, April Baker, Beth Donofrio, and Louis Cozolino. In addition, I share comments from readers.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Teachers say Math instruction needs improvement

Teachers say Math instruction needs improvement | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

"The report was compiled by two statewide math educator groups, as well as the Gordon A. Cain Center for STEM Literacy at Louisiana State University.

According to statistics provided in the report, about 42 percent of fourth-grade students, and 34 percent of eighth-grade students in the United States, are considered proficient in math based on standardized tests. In Louisiana, the figures are even lower — 27 percent of fourth-graders, and 21 percent of eighth-graders — were categorized as proficient.

In addition, only about half of high school students in Louisiana have mastered all of the skill areas in algebra and geometry, according to end-of-course data in the report."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Regrouping Students: Leverage Teacher Expertise

Regrouping Students: Leverage Teacher Expertise | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
By regrouping students for certain lessons, schools can leverage the instructional expertise of their teachers. See how one school builds differentiated instruction and regrouping students into their science program.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Leaders Grow Leaders and 20 More Leadership Tips from the Experts

Leaders Grow Leaders and 20 More Leadership Tips from the Experts | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Make it a priority to develop your current leaders, nurture your future leaders, and hire great leaders.
"Strong leadership is one of the key pillars of success at any organization. People aren't necessarily born with great leadership skills. As such, organizations can't just sit back and hope people will be great leaders. Leaders need to be shaped and molded. And by leaders, I don't just mean executives--I mean managers at every level of the organization. Too often frontline managers are overlooked when it comes to leadership development, when the reality is that 70 percent to 80 percent of the workforce reports to frontline managers. The results of a study we did with Harvard Business Review Analytic Services reveals 79 percent of global executives believe lack of frontline leadership capability negatively impacts company performance. As such, it's critical to the success of any organization that these people be given the tools, resources, and development to succeed."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What missing class in Kindergarten means for high school

Kindergarten Absenteeism Impacts Later Education.

The Provo (UT) Daily Herald (12/12) reports that as research shows missing even two days of school a month in first and second grades impacts test scores later on, schools are trying to understand and prevent children missing school rather than punishing “truancy.” UC Santa Barbara education economist Michael Gottfried said that “Missing even a few days a month can add up to a month of missed school over a school year and significantly undermine performance.” He has found that “strong chronic absence,” or missing 18 or more days a year, in kindergarten lowered their math and reading test scores, particularly among low-income students, and a 2011 study by Attendance Works found only 13 percent of chronically absent students performed at grade level.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

U.S. university enrollment continues to slide - The Hechinger Report

U.S. university enrollment continues to slide - The Hechinger Report | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

The number of students overall fell by about 1 percent, or 250,000, at the very time that policymakers are pushing to speed up the pace at which the nation is producing college graduates.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Schools’ Discipline for Girls Differs by Race and Hue - NYTimes.com

Schools’ Discipline for Girls Differs by Race and Hue - NYTimes.com | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
School Discipline Racial Disparities Also Impact Girls.

The New York Times (12/11, Subscription Publication) reports that while much attention has been focused on racial disparities in school discipline for boys, “there is increasing focus on the way those issues affect black girls as well.” The piece notes that according to data from ED’s Office for Civil Rights, “black girls in public elementary and secondary schools nationwide were suspended at a rate of 12 percent, compared with a rate of just 2 percent for white girls, and more than girls of any other race or ethnicity.” The article examines a number of statistics related to this issue, and concludes by reporting that Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights Catherine Lhamon “said the discrepancies in disciplinary practices were not lost on young girls of color,” and quotes her saying, “The felt experience of too many of our girls in school is that they are being discriminated against. The message we send when we suspend or expel any student is that that student is not worthy of being in the school. That is a pretty ugly message to internalize and very, very difficult to get past as part of an educational career.”

more...
No comment yet.