Leading Schools
Follow
Find
57.9K views | +2 today
 
Scooped by Mel Riddile
onto Leading Schools
Scoop.it!

Research Points To Ninth Grade As The Most Important High School Year

Research Points To Ninth Grade As The Most Important High School Year | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
How a student performs in ninth grade is a solid indicator of whether they will complete high school, research shows.
more...
No comment yet.
Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


more...
Beth Crisafulli Hofer's comment, January 10, 6:54 PM
I'm going to add some of these to our framework!
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Learning about learning: What every teacher needs to know - David Didau: The Learning Spy

Learning about learning: What every teacher needs to know - David Didau: The Learning Spy | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
When I trained to be teacher I was told little or nothing about how children learn. Because a lot of what we intuitively suppose about the process of learning is often flatly contradicted by cognitive science this was a huge handicap. Since you can’t think about stuff you don’t know, I spent all my time pontificating on the process
more...
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, February 4, 9:23 AM

Engage your students by understanding some of what scientists have learned about learning. Ask probing questions to really think critically. Great suggestions for any level teacher.

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

How a Math teacher gets all his students to pass the AP Calculus exam

How a Math teacher gets all his students to pass the AP Calculus exam | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Anthony Yom worked in virtual obscurity until the news last week that one of his students was among only 12 in the world to slay the Advanced Placement Calculus exam with a perfect score.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Alfie Kohn on 10 truths about educating kids that keep getting ignored

Alfie Kohn on 10 truths about educating kids that keep getting ignored | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
'If we all agree that a given principle is true, then why in the world do our schools still function as if it weren’t?'
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mel Riddile from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

With Math I Can! : Growth Mindset Tools

With Math I Can! : Growth Mindset Tools | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Take the With Math I Can growth mindset pledge and access worksheets, lesson plans and other growth mindset resources for use at home, in your classroom and in your district. From Amazon Education, TenMarks, Common Sense Education, ClassDojo, PERTS, Jo Boaler and more. Stop saying I’m not good at math.

Via Darren Burris
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Coach John Wooden’s Ted Talk: 15 Lessons on the Difference between Winning and Succeeding.

Coach John Wooden’s Ted Talk:  15 Lessons on the Difference between Winning and Succeeding. | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
These are my 15 takeaways from this inspirational teacher-coach’s speech:
We are all average in some areas, and there is no fault to be assigned or shame in this. “They thought a C was all right for the neighbors’ children, because the neighbors children are all average. But they weren’t satisfied when their own — would make the teacher feel that they had failed, or the youngster had failed. And that’s not right.”
Be the best version of YOU.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Why Are We So Slow to Change the Way We Teach? Most teachers teach the way they were taught...

Why Are We So Slow to Change the Way We Teach? Most teachers teach the way they were taught... | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Many aspects of teaching—lecture, course design, assignments, and grading—have changed little over the years. The question is, “Why?” 
Mel Riddile's insight:

Most teachers teach the way they were taught unless we, school leaders, provide them with a viable alternative!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What is Feedback? Does Feedback Improve Learning

What is Feedback? Does Feedback Improve Learning | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

by Grant Wiggins


Advice, evaluation, grades—none of these provide the descriptive information that students need to reach their goals. What is true feedback—and how can it improve learning?

Who would dispute the idea that feedback is a good thing? Both common sense and research make it clear: Formative assessment, consisting of lots of feedback and opportunities to use that feedback, enhances performance and achievement.

Yet even John Hattie (2008), whose decades of research revealed that feedback was among the most powerful influences on achievement, acknowledges that he has "struggled to understand the concept" (p. 173). And many writings on the subject don't even attempt to define the term. To improve formative assessment practices among both teachers and assessment designers, we need to look more closely at just what feedback is—and isn't.

more...
Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, February 2, 9:14 AM

Students engage when they have feedback toward improving learning. Grant Wiggins has written another valuable resource for teachers.

Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

How To Be A Great Teacher, From 12 Great Teachers

How To Be A Great Teacher, From 12 Great Teachers | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Lessons from our 50 Great Teachers project: Top educators on trust, caring, respect and awakening "something you've never seen before."
more...
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Co-Teaching: Toxics, Separatists and Troopers

Co-Teaching: Toxics, Separatists and Troopers | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Now is the time to be honest with yourself and with your co-teacher because we’ve had time to establish relationships and routines—and it’s not too late to make any necessary changes.

If all is moving along smoothly—let each other know. Share time over a cup of coffee to express specifically what is going well and how you may sustain your co-teaching groove the remainder of the year. And congratulations.

If you’re not on a focused and effective path—that’s OK—there’s still time. Take a deep breath, buckle up, and make a change! This mid-point in the year is the perfect moment to tweak (and overhaul, if necessary) any ineffective co-teaching realities.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

No Fear Shakespeare: Shakespeare's plays plus a modern translation you can understand

No Fear Shakespeare: Shakespeare's plays plus a modern translation you can understand | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
No Fear Shakespeare puts Shakespeare's language side-by-side with a facing-page translation into modern English—the kind of English people actually speak today.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Increased Financial Commitments Improve Student Outcomes - Money Matters

Increased Financial Commitments Improve Student Outcomes - Money Matters | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
While money alone may not be the answer, more equitable and adequate allocation of financial inputs to schooling provide a necessary underlying condition for improving the equity and adequacy of outcomes. The available evidence suggests that appropriate combinations of more adequate funding with more accountability for its use may be most promising.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What Helps Kids Develop Conceptual Understanding in Math?

What Helps Kids Develop Conceptual Understanding in Math? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

A new video that launched this week, Concept First, Notation Last, focuses on something many of us are striving for with our students: developing conceptual understanding. Thanks to Common Core, the focus in math instruction has shifted from repetitive practice and rote memorization to a far deeper level of learning. Developing conceptual understanding requires activating students’ prior knowledge and helping them internalize mathematical concepts, while simultaneously guiding them towards procedural fluency and computational competency — all underpinned by a basic impulse to make sense of math. I’m excited to try out the strategies shared by Leah Alcala in her new video in my own classroom.



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Are You a Leader, or Just Pretending to Be One?

Are You a Leader, or Just Pretending to Be One? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
When leaders empower people through a higher purpose, they don’t have to “create buy-in” or use other marketing tactics to win over their followers. Leaders who do find themselves acting something like a pusher — resorting to perks, tit-for-tats, and bonuses — might want to ask themselves if they’re missing some larger point. A leader isn’t a salesman. When Steve Jobs asked John Sculley his famous question, “Do you really want to spend your life selling sugared water, or do you want a chance to change the world?” he was making just such a distinction. Selling sugared water might make you a few bucks — but only at the cost of doing something that matters. The purpose of a leader is to create a purpose.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Why Collaborative Leadership Matters Most

Why Collaborative Leadership Matters Most | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Leaders hear a lot about being instructional leaders, but in order to bring all stakeholders together, they must be collaborative leaders.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What Really is Best Practice?

What Really is Best Practice? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
No test results or any other kind of "data" are available with which to evaluate the effectiveness of either the program (standards) or the testing process.  Further, with an emphasis on a set of standards and a demanding test (I've seen it...it is indeed much more difficult than Washington's current MSP), but without specific curriculum for and by which the standards writers can be held accountable, schools and teachers are on the line to produce success on a set of standards that are based on an intellectual premise, and one that is far from obviously best practice, because it's not clear there is such a thing.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Common Core States are More Transparent in Reporting K-12 Proficiency

Common Core States are More Transparent in Reporting K-12 Proficiency | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
states are becoming more honest about the proficiency of their students in reading and math after it was revealed eight months ago that most were grossly misleading the public.

Higher standards and modern assessments thanks to the adoption of Common Core Standards could be a big factor in this change.

Called ‘the honesty gap,’ it is the phenomenon that occurs when huge gaps exist between "state NAEP scores and what states report as their proficiency rate,” said HonestyGap.org.

NAEP scores, or the scores on tests administered by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), are considered to be the gold standard in judging student assessments.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

"For rural school districts, securing and maintaining high-speed internet can present significant challenges."

"For rural school districts, securing and maintaining high-speed internet can present significant challenges." | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
News, voices and jobs for education professionals. Optimized for your mobile phone.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

USDE gives states AND districts ways to cut standardized testing

USDE gives states AND districts ways to cut standardized testing | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is offering states and local school districts a lesson plan of sorts to cut the amount of time that students spend on those fill-in-the-bubble and other standardized tests.
The Education Department released guidance Tuesday to states and local school districts outlining different ways they can use existing federal money to reduce testing in the nation's public schools. It follows a call by President Barack Obama last October to cap standardized testing and complaints by teachers, parents and others that that too many hours are spent "teaching to the test."
In a letter to state school officials, the department details how certain federal money can be used to cut tests. States and districts, for example, could use federal education dollars intended for the development of state assessments to instead conduct audits of their tests to see if they have redundant assessments or low-quality ones that could be eliminated.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Does Disciplinary Literacy Have a Place in Elementary School? Tim Shanahan

Does Disciplinary Literacy Have a Place in Elementary School? Tim Shanahan | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Few issues are hotter now than disciplinary literacy. The Common Core State Standards (CCSS) established disciplinary reading goals for grades 6–12, and most of the research on that topic has been done at those grades, too. That means elementary teachers can breathe a sigh of relief, right? Not really. There might not be specific disciplinary goals set for the young'uns, but elementary teachers still have an important role to play if their students are to eventually reach college- and career-readiness.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

A Navy SEAL Explains 8 Secrets to Mindset, Grit and Resilience

Carol Dweck’s research at Stanford shows that a “growth mindset” (believing abilities aren’t fixed and you can improve) is a key element of success. And Angela Duckworth has found this attitude is tied to grit:

…we have found moderate, positive associations between grit and growth mindset, suggesting that growth mindset, like optimistic explanatory style, may contribute to the tendency to sustain effort toward and commitment to goals.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

‘Lesson Study’ Technique: What Teachers Can Learn From One Another

‘Lesson Study’ Technique: What Teachers Can Learn From One Another | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
By working together in teams and examining how students are learning, educators are finding better ways to teach lessons.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Exit Tickets: Checking for Understanding

Exit Tickets: Checking for Understanding | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

"Exit tickets are a formative assessment tool that give teachers a way to assess how well students understand the material they are learning in class. This tool can be used daily or weekly, depending on the unit being taught. A good exit ticket can tell whether students have a superficial or in-depth understanding of the material. Teachers can then use this data for adapting instruction to meet students' needs the very next day."

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Mel Riddile from Education and Training
Scoop.it!

Teach students to communicate effectively in the Innovation Age

Teach students to communicate effectively in the Innovation Age | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Communication looks different in the Innovation Age compared to the Information Age of yesteryear. Here's how to help students succeed.

Via Bobby Dillard
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

Spaced repetition: a hack to make your brain store information

Spaced repetition: a hack to make your brain store information | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Using spaced repetition as a study technique is effective because you are deliberately hacking the way your brain works
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Mel Riddile
Scoop.it!

What makes classroom visits worthwhile? A focus on growth and relationships.

What makes classroom visits worthwhile? A focus on growth and relationships. | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

1. Make walk throughs frequent and routine. It can be very challenging to do this. The principal's job is built for distraction. The goal is to have multiple drop-in visits at various times throughout the school year to get an overall understanding of the teacher's work and how students are learning. The conversations gain depth and clarity when the teacher and the principal understand the classroom dynamics over time.

2. Avoid checklists or forms. I've used a variety of checklists and forms in the past, but I don't anymore. I don't want the teacher to focus on boxes that were or were not checked. Not every instructional strategy is going to be present in every lesson, but many teachers think it's a negative if they don't get lots of positive check marks. The forms become the focus instead of the conversation. I want both parties offering ideas into the dialogue. With forms and checklists, it feels like the principal is the only voice that matters.

3. Don't rate teachers on walk throughs.

more...
No comment yet.