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8 Different Ways to Get Great Ideas

8 Different Ways to Get Great Ideas | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
We asked eight innovative Stanford GSB alumni entrepreneurs including Kiva’s Jessica Jackley (MBA ’07) and Design Within Reach’s Rob Forbes (MBA ’85) to shed light on how they come up with their best...
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Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
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Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student

Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Our toolkit for educators includes videos, case studies and more that lead you to a forum for equity, personalization, smart data, collaboration and continuous improvement...
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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, July 3, 6:53 AM

NASSP sponsored tools for success. Take a look at the many resources for new and experienced leaders alike.

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Education Is Not 'Moneyball': Why Teachers Can't Trust Value-Added Evaluations Yet

Education Is Not 'Moneyball': Why Teachers Can't Trust Value-Added Evaluations Yet | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
High school math teacher William Eger argues that there's too much randomness in classrooms for teachers to be evaluated statistically like baseball players.
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Mini-PD: Fostering a Growth Mindset in Every Student

"We hosted a live Mini-PD session on Google+ last night focusing on "Fostering a Growth Mindset in Every Student." Here is a replay of the 35-minute session.

Panelists include David Dockterman of Harvard/Scholastic, Eduardo Briceño of Mindset Works, and two experienced educators, Emily Diehl and Trilby Hillenbrand.

In this session, educators can:

  1. Learn about the research on “academic mindsets” and other non-cognitive skills.
  2. Walk away with tangible advice and tips for incorporating this promising research in your classroom and school.
  3. Learn the difference between praising effort and praising results.
  4. Hear from educators already implementing “growth mindset” research in schools."
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Course Syllabi are the "Intellectual Property of Faculty Members: Court Rules

Course Syllabi are the "Intellectual Property of Faculty Members: Court Rules | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A panel of judges ruled in favor of the University of Missouri System in an appeals case Tuesday, determining that course syllabi are exempted from Missouri’s open records law because they are ultimately the intellectual property of faculty members.
Mel Riddile's insight:

The University of Missouri is a public university. Does this ruling apply to K-12 teachers?

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Using well-designed digital games as 'Preferred Activity Time'

Using well-designed digital games as 'Preferred Activity Time' | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Research is verifying what many teachers know: Well-designed digital games in the classroom increase student engagement, learning and retention. They improve students’ on-task time and even their social and emotional well-being. The benefits are especially significant when high-quality games are integrated into a curriculum over multiple lessons. So how can we put this knowledge to use as our new school year begins?

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Schools Rethink Discipline

Schools Rethink Discipline | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
With the share of white students falling and Latino students rising, school suspension and expulsion figures in the United States risk hitting new highs, unless more districts tackle their discipline policies head on....
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Sleep Before Class, Not in It

Sleep Before Class, Not in It | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The school day starts too soon and ends too soon, while summer vacation runs too long.  
Mel Riddile's insight:

"Students need 40 winks a night and more than 40 weeks of school. It shouldn’t be so hard to make sure they get both."

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100 Search Engines For Academic Research

100 Search Engines For Academic Research | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
100 Search Engines For Academic Research




Via Jim Lerman
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Howard Cohen's curator insight, August 27, 10:00 AM

searchin' ain't eeeeezzyyy

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Teacher Evaluation: Are "principals reluctant to issue low ratings?"

Teacher Evaluation: Are "principals reluctant to issue low ratings?" | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Education Week reports on the continuing trend in teacher ratings across the country. Both Hawaii and Delaware data show an overwhelming majority of teachers meeting standards. "As in many other states, among them Michigan, Florida, and Indiana, only a small fraction of teachers are getting low ratings."


Questions posed by the author"

  1. To what extent is the evaluation process shaped by the norms at work in each school?
  2. In other words, are principals reluctant to issue low ratings because of the likelihood that it could affect morale and working relationships"
  3. Does the shortage of teachers in fields like special education impact the ratings?
Mel Riddile's insight:

New, higher college and career-ready standards have significantly raised expectations regarding what all students should know and be able to do. Heightened expectations for student achievement raises the bar for teachers. Principals in the know understand that we must build the capacity of teachers to deliver these new standards. For example, few secondary teachers have been trained to effectively integrate literacy--purposeful reading, writing, and discussion--into their content areas. Yet, under the new standards, literacy is a "shared responsibility" across all content areas.


It is unethical to rate teachers on skills that we know they don't have...yet. Until the new standards and expectations are firmly entrenched in the culture of schools, principals must be builders of capacity, not inspectors of processes.

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New Safety Measures Greet Students

New Safety Measures Greet Students | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Public schools nationwide are greeting students with a host of new security measures, as efforts to safeguard districts show no sign of waning in the aftermath of the Sandy Hook Elementary massacre.
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Best Classroom Management: "I don't need a system to handle misbehavior because it so rarely occurs."

Best Classroom Management: "I don't need a system to handle misbehavior because it so rarely occurs." | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
New teachers have an opportunity to create a classroom where students feel secure, valued & successful. Veteran Cheryl Mizerny shares ideas that work for her.


"As teachers begin this school year, their thoughts undoubtedly turn to the classroom climate they want to establish and maintain. One question that I am often asked (especially by newer teachers) is what kind of classroom management program I use. My answer is that I don’t.


What I prefer instead is to develop a classroom that does not require a system to handle misbehavior because it so rarely occurs. No checkmarks on the board, no list of consequences, no rewards. Just engaged, productive, friendly students."

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Do we need teacher cams?Just because we can, should we?

Do we need teacher cams?Just because we can, should we? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
If you've ever had the distinct displeasure of calling a customer service hotline, you've probably heard a soothing voice tell you that "this call may be monitored for quality assurance purposes."


"While I will happily concede that video recording is particularly important for the police, in light of their ability to use deadly force, there are many public servants who have considerable power over others and who are shielded from scrutiny in the absence of video recording.

Public school teachers and administrators are the most obvious example. In March, the Justice Department issued an alarming report on racial disparities in school discipline policies. For example, while black children represent only 18 percent of all children attending preschool, 42 percent of all preschool students suspended once are black, as are 48 percent of children suspended more than once.

Video recordings could determine whether teachers are systematically biased against black students, if they are disciplining students in an entirely race-neutral way, or if the truth is somewhere in between. Investigators could identify patterns that could help inform how teachers are trained to manage their classrooms.

What's more, video recording could allow teachers to evaluate their progress, and to share their experiences with other teachers who can help them think through how to improve their performances."

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Quiz Yourself: How Good Are You at Teaching the Art of Learning?

Quiz Yourself: How Good Are You at Teaching the Art of Learning? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Test how well you know some of these counterintuitive study tips.
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Free-lunch as a measure of child poverty seen as less accurate

Free-lunch as a measure of child poverty seen as less accurate | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Education data crunchers are seeking an alternative to the current yardstick—the percentage of students who qualify for free and reduced-price school meals.


"Students' socioeconomic status "is the one thing we are the worst at capturing, and it might be the single most important variable for us as academics, as teachers, as clinicians," said Ramani Durvasula, an associate psychology professor at California State University, Los Angeles, in a lecture on poverty at the American Psychological Association meeting in Washington this month."

Mel Riddile's insight:

"as poor students get older and become less inclined to eat in the school cafeteria."

"high schools applying for federal Title I grants often must use data from feeder schools to help prove their poverty rates, because older students are more reluctant to sign up for meals."

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A "Whirlwind of administrative turnover": District to rely on first-time principals to overcome budget crisis

A "Whirlwind of administrative turnover": District to rely on first-time principals to overcome budget crisis | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Why on earth would you want to work in the Philadelphia school district? It s the question the leader of city schools has been using to grill principal candidates all summer long Wanna be principals.

Mel Riddile's insight:

"The district has weathered a whirlwind of administrative turnover in the past few years. 

  • Forty-seven schools will have a new principal this year.
  • Last year, 58 schools saw changes at the top.
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The First Day of School Sets the Tone for the Entire School Year: 3 Resources for Teachers

"Your expectations are what you allow them to do, not what you say."


Here are three Teaching Channel resources emphasizing the importance setting the tone on the first day of school:


Setting the Tone from Day One

 

Setting Expectations on the First Day of School

 

Tough Love: The First Day of School

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What Happens When the Teacher Stops Talking? A Simple and Effective Student Engagement Strategy

What Happens When the Teacher Stops Talking? A Simple and Effective Student Engagement Strategy | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

On a recent school visit, I was discussing student engagement with a group of school leaders when a member of the group offered the following observation: "I think teachers are reluctant to turn the class over to a guided activity because they are concerned about classroom management."


My Response


Teachers cannot teach if they cannot manage classroom behavior. They know that and we know that. Unless we build teacher capacity to engage students in guided group activities, they will be reluctant to "stop talking" because they are afraid they will lose control. In other words, teachers must be taught what to do when they stop talking and students are working.


Remember, the brain that does the work does the learning. If we expect to dramatically increase the amount of student work and simultaneously decrease the amount of teacher talk, we must build the capacity of teachers to check for understanding and facilitate group processes while keeping all the students on-task.


Most teachers make the big mistake of spending too much time with a few individuals and while they are "fixing" those few students, the rest of the class gets off-task. It does not take long for teachers to figure out that this is not working and they revert back to their comfort zone and a teacher-centered style of instruction. 


Furthermore, the natural tendency to "fix" struggling students actually has the unintended consequence of creating "dependent" students, who quickly learn that, if they wait until the teacher stops talking to raise their hand, the teacher will come over and do their work for them. So, not only are were losing control of the class, but we are creating dependent learners who will not even attempt to complete the assignment because they know the teacher will bail them out.


Years of implementing a school wide instructional framework taught me that our teachers had to have a strategy for keeping students on-task and engaged while they circulated through the room. Fred Jones’s Praise, Prompt, and Leave (PPL) strategy is one that we found particularly useful for strengthening student engagement.


Keys to Implementation of PPL


We asked teachers to:

  • Begin the year using groups of two (collaborative pairs), which were easier to manage and easier to keep on-task.
  • Chunk the lesson or task into smaller segments.
  • Keep the outcome in mind. The goal was not to fix students, but rather to ensure that they were on-task and that the students demonstrated understanding of the task at hand.
  • Don't let too many students get to far off course! When needed stop the group activity and re-teach a key point. The only way the teacher knows whether students are off course is to circulate throughout the classroom checking for understanding.
  • Motion creates emotion. An effective teacher moved around the classroom with ease and did not get stuck instructing one or two students.
  • Every 10-12 minutes of group activity refocus the students and point out any key concepts or share your observations.


Follow a simple three step process:

  1. Praise - Point out where the student is and what the student has done so far.
  2. Prompt - Tell the student what to do next and that you will be back to check on them.
  3. Leave - Spend as little time with each student as possible. The goal is to check on the understanding of all students not to re-teach a few students.


For a more detailed explanation of Praise, Prompt, and Leave, follow this link: http://info.marygrove.edu/matblog/a-simple-and-effective-student-engagement-strategy-praise-prompt-and-leave



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Preferred Activity Time (PAT) Bank of Strategies for Teachers

What if we could build willpower and self-control in our students? As Roy Baumeister discusses in Willpower: Rediscovering the Greatest Human Strength, one strategy to use in building willpower and self-control is to provide students with options, choices, or in this case contingencies also referred to as if x then y options.


  • If I run two miles then I can do ___ later today.
  • If I diet all week, then I can have one "cheat day." 


Teachers can build willpower and self-control by using Preferred Activity Time (PAT) or contingencies with students. If we finish this activity, then we can do ____.


They key point is that the students are always learning. This is not about games for the sake of games. Learning is fun!


Our teachers got a lot of mileage from Learn Star, which uses a direct response system which allows students to answer teacher-designed or a predesigned set of questions. Our hardest to reach students loved PAT.


This is a link to the Tools for Teaching PAT Bank, which features an ever growing bank of games and activities to be used in Responsibility Training's Preferred Activity Time (PAT). 


Any lesson/curriculum can quickly become a PAT by making it a team game. In addition to the activities below, any game show format used on TV will work.


Teachers commonly use Jeopardy, Family Feud, Twenty-One, Concentration, What’s My Line?, Who Wants to Be a Millionaire?, To Tell the Truth, and College Bowl. Also, see our PAT Tips page for some more ways to use PATs.

"Our sixth graders favorite PAT is jeopardy played with their world history vocabulary words. They complained when their PAT time was postponed because of a field trip! 'Can't we take the field trip another day, today is PAT time.'"

- Lynn Layman of Greathouse Elementary, Midland, TX


Additional PAT Resources:

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The Debate Over Anti-Plagiarism Software

The Debate Over Anti-Plagiarism Software | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
One company and its algorithms are changing the way America's schools handle classroom ethics.


"Hammer Or A Scalpel

For Schroeder, the software is a scalpel. She asks her students to use Turnitin on rough drafts, so they can learn from their mistakes. No penalty. No trip to the dean's office.

But Emma Zaballos, a senior at American University, says she had a professor who used Turnitin like a hammer against suspected plagiarists. He made a point of telling her class stories of past offenders he had reported to the academic board and worked to have expelled."

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Who should decide what is taught in schools? - Poll

Who should decide what is taught in schools? - Poll | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A pair of wide-ranging polls by PDK/Gallup and Education Next gauge sentiment on the common standards, testing, school funding, and other hot-button issues.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Overwhelming support for local control.

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"It’s the third week of school and we haven’t learned anything."

"It’s the third week of school and we haven’t learned anything." | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Hundreds of students walked out of class at Jefferson High School on Monday morning, holding a sit-in to protest a host of issues at the South Los Angeles campus -- among them a scheduling snafu that has extended into the third week of school.
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How to Get Kids to Class

How to Get Kids to Class | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Poor students don’t just need teachers. They need social workers.


"policy makers usually treat dropout rates and chronic absenteeism as “school” problems, while issues like housing and mental health are “social” problems with a different set of solutions."


The key is to put dedicated social-service specialists in every low-performing, high-poverty school, whether they are employed by the school district or another organization. This specialist must be trained in the delivery of community services, with continued funding contingent on improvement in indicators like attendance and dropout rates.

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Doctors’ orders: Start school days later

Doctors’ orders: Start school days later | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

DESPITE THE harmful effects of sleep loss on adolescents, many school districts maintain cock-crow start times for high school students. Reasons for the status quo run the gamut from “it’s always been this way” to “it’s too hard to change.” But a national organization of doctors who treat children is weighing in on what it calls a public health issue.

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Age of Distraction: Why It’s Crucial for Students to Learn to Focus

Age of Distraction: Why It’s Crucial for Students to Learn to Focus | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Learning to focus on one task while tuning out the many distractions vying for attention is a crucial life skill that some students are missing.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Note to school leaders: Teachers in most schools are exerting far too much effort focusing students instead of creating the conditions that build self-control and help students learn to focus.


This is a school wide issue that cannot be corrected by individual teachers, but through the focused leadership of a strong instructional leader.

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How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies

How Does the Brain Learn Best? Smart Studying Strategies | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A practical and engaging guide to smart studying tips.
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Students Aren't Getting Enough Sleep—School Starts Too Early

Students Aren't Getting Enough Sleep—School Starts Too Early | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new report from the American Academy of Pediatrics says delaying the day may help teens get more rest.


“insufficient sleep in adolescents [is] an important public health issue that significantly affects the health and safety, as well as the academic success, of our nation’s middle and high school students.”

Mel Riddile's insight:

"58 percent of 15- to 17-year-olds regularly sleep fewer than seven hours each night."

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