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23 Great Sources For Free Educational Videos Online

23 Great Sources For Free Educational Videos Online | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Students love to watch and learn. Why not showcase some of the best free educational videos and their repositories then?

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, November 28, 2013 7:26 AM

Very nice sharing. Thanks

Scott Anderson (Daymap)'s curator insight, December 1, 2013 7:53 PM

Here are some fantastic and free links teachers can use!

Maggie McGuirk Veres's curator insight, September 3, 2014 1:48 PM

It's worth a look.

 

Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


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LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, April 24, 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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Mentors for New Teachers Found to Boost Student Achievement—by a Lot

Mentors for New Teachers Found to Boost Student Achievement—by a Lot | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
If new teachers are paired with high-quality, trained mentors and receive frequent feedback, their students may receive the equivalent of up to five months of additional learning, a new study found. 

The study, conducted by SRI Education, was an independent evaluation of the New Teacher Center's induction program funded through the Investing in Innovation (i3) Validation grant. NTC was one of 20 organizations to receive the Obama-era federal grant in 2012 and has implemented induction programs in three sites: the Chicago school district, Broward County schools in Florida, and the Grant Wood Area Education Agency, which is a consortium of 32 school districts in eastern Iowa. This study reported on the findings from randomized controlled trials in just Broward County and Chicago. 
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Study Suggests That Simple Writing Exercise Gets Big Results

Study Suggests That Simple Writing Exercise Gets Big Results | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Stanford researcher Geoffrey Cohen and others have conducted several experiments over the years having students do a simple writing exercise about their values that has resulted in increased academic achievement over the course of a year.
I’ve written in detail about what they’ve done and how I regularly replicate the exercise in my classroom. You can read about that process in these two pieces, one here in my blog (Useful Writing Exercise For Helping Students Develop Self-Esteem) and the other a guest post at The New York Times Learning Network (Guest Post | Helping Students Motivate Themselves).
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How Managers Drive Results and Employee Engagement at the Same Time

How Managers Drive Results and Employee Engagement at the Same Time | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Is it possible to be a high-standards, results-driven leader while at the same time building an engaged, fun-to-work-with team? Many people would contend that doing either of these things well makes it almost impossible to succeed at the other. And yet our examination of 360-degree assessment data from more than 60,000 leaders showed us that leaders who were rated in the top quartile of both skills ranked in the 91st percentile of all leaders. It seems that not only is it possible to do both things well, but the best leaders are the very ones who manage to do both
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The Coach Approach to Giving and Receiving Feedback in Schools

The Coach Approach to Giving and Receiving Feedback in Schools | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Today's guest blog is written by Shira Leibowitz, Ph.D, co-author of The Coach Approach To School Leadership: Leading Teachers to Higher Levels of Effectiveness and Founding Lower School Director of Portfolio School.

Feedback, among the most impactful, and yet also among the most variable influences on student achievement, matters. It matters profoundly.

Educational researcher and thought leader John Hattie (2009), whose investigation of more than 800 meta-analyses represents the largest collection of evidence-based research into what actually works in schools, has found feedback to be among the top 10 influences on student achievement. While Hattie's  research primarily describes the effect of feedback from teachers to students, he asserts that his findings pertain to professional learning as well. Simply stated, for schools to improve, feedback to both educators and students is essential.

Yet, Hattie offers a cautionary note. While skillfully shared feedback can catapult learning to new heights, poorly offered feedback can have minimal impact, or worse, can potentially have negative impact, leading to disengagement and resentment.
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, June 20, 10:14 AM
Engage your teachers with valuable and effective feedback and your students will be more engaged also. Pertinent suggestions in this article.
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I Want to Get Better at... Classroom Management

I Want to Get Better at... Classroom Management | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Does anyone not want to get better at classroom management? Even the most experienced teachers can find ways to make their classrooms more welcoming and productive places. But for new teachers, classroom management can feel make it or break it.

If you’ve had a rough year, congratulations on getting through it!
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How Great Leaders Transform A Broken Culture

How Great Leaders Transform A Broken Culture | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
It all starts with inspiring a shift in mindset, and moving away from the sentiment of “that’s just how things are around here” to “this is how we are going to think and act from now on.” And that starts at the top. When leaders embrace a new way of thinking and match words and actions with authenticity. Then and only then can they lead change and transform a culture.

A great example can be drawn from my time in Navy SEAL training. The initial six months is called BUD/S (Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL). One of the most fascinating things about BUD/S is the evolution of the students’ mindset. Those that thrive during the worst parts learn to channel all of the pain, shivering and misery into aggression. An aggression so powerful it drives them with an unwavering pursuit to make it to the end. An aggression that fuels the metamorphosis from a young scared tadpole to a strong, bold and confident frogman.
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Intrinsic Motivation: Be Better at Life by Thinking of Yourself Less

Intrinsic Motivation: Be Better at Life by Thinking of Yourself Less | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The motivation Eaton described is a good example of the power of self-transcendence. In a paradoxical twist, the research suggests that the less we think about ourselves, the better we become. Self-transcendence not only allows us to overcome our greatest fears and break through our limits, but it also improves our performance in less heroic, everyday activities. In one study, researchers from the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania found that hospital janitors who cleaned bedpans and mopped floors performed better and reported higher levels of satisfaction when their job was framed as being integral to the healing of other people. The janitors were constantly reminded that by keeping the hospital clean, they were minimizing the chance of bacteria spreading and harming the already vulnerable patients. They no longer saw their job as just removing vomit from the floors; they saw it as saving lives. Some hospitals have even eliminated the job titles “janitor” and “custodian” in favor of titles like “health and safety team member” or “environmental health worker.”
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Hidden agendas that can ruin performance conversations

The purpose of performance conversations is to improve employee performance. What often stands in the way of an effective performance conversation is the manager’s hidden agenda. In this article I talk about the five hidden agendas that prevent good performance conversations:
Mel Riddile's insight:

Performance conversations can go wrong when managers have ulterior agendas, such as seeking to punish their reports or only meeting to comply with company policy, writes Marlene Chism. "Take a moment to get clear on what the employee can do or should stop doing in order to improve performance," she writes.

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Why Students Need More Low-Stakes Tests : Retrieval Practice

Why Students Need More Low-Stakes Tests : Retrieval Practice | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
“When your students take more low stakes tests they get more familiar with what they’re struggling with, and so do you, so you can focus more of your teaching and homework on that more challenging content,” Dunlosky said. In many ways he’s describing formative assessment, a practice teachers have always used, but quizzing isn’t just for teachers to take the pulse of the class, it’s good for students’ brains too.

A study conducted by Andrew Butler in 2010 compared how well students performed on a variety of tests when they either restudied material or took practices tests and restudied. He found that not only did students who studied and took a practice test remember more of the specific information than those who merely restudied, they also performed almost two times better on questions that required them to make inferences.

“Students get a really powerful boost in their learning and ability to utilize that knowledge in other contexts,” Dunlosky said. Butler’s study is often cited as an example that retrieval practice can lead to transfer both within a domain and to new ones. “Testing the content, just retrieving the content from memory, allows them to use that content flexibly later,” Dunlosky said.
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Why Shouldn't Teachers Become Principals?

Why Shouldn't Teachers Become Principals? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
When people leave the classroom in order to take on a building leadership role they are often confronted with more than a few people saying it's too bad that they are leaving the classroom to go to the "dark side." They are told that they will be disconnected from students. Colleagues begin to treat them differently. The leaders I met from Iowa were anything but disconnected.

I believe that many people who leave the classroom to take on a building role do it because they want to take on the responsibility of bringing more teachers together, and believe that they can bring a whole school community together as well. Other times people go into leadership because they have either worked for a great leader they wish to emulate or worked for a leader who taught them what not to do...and they believe they could be a better leader than that.
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"You alone cannot be the one to foster change. Look around ...for the one who can."

"You alone cannot be the one to foster change. Look around ...for the one who can." | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
No matter how experienced you are, sometimes you cannot be the one to teach the lesson. You alone cannot be the one to foster the change. In those instances, look around with open eyes for the one who can.
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How to Ask Purposeful Questions to Engage Your Team

There are four main reasons to ask questions: to understand, assess, innovate and motivate. It is important to understand your objectives before you start asking. Within each objective, your question might focus on the person or the project/process. For example, if you want to understand, most leaders jump directly to questions that help them understand their team's projects and processes by asking:

What's the goal?
What's the plan?
What are your options?
However, excellent leaders start with questions to help understand their people, such as:

In which areas would you like to grow?
What do you love to do?
What do you need to be at your very best?
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Challenging the status quo in mathematics: Teaching for understanding

Challenging the status quo in mathematics: Teaching for understanding | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Despite decades of reform efforts, mathematics teaching in the U.S. has changed little in the last century. As a result, it seems, American students have been left behind, now ranking 40th in the world in math literacy.

Several state and national reform efforts have tried to improve things. The most recent Common Core standards had a great deal of promise with their focus on how to teach mathematics, but after several years, changes in teaching practices have been minimal.
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America's High Schools Abandoning Valedictorian Award — Over Fear of 'Unhealthy Competition'

America's High Schools Abandoning Valedictorian Award — Over Fear of 'Unhealthy Competition' | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
As Carolyn Thompson of the Associated Press wrote last week, half of the nation's high schools no longer report class rankings to colleges and universities.

Thompson paraphrases Bob Farace, spokesman for the National Association of Secondary School Principles, saying high school administrators are concerned with college prospects for students separated by large differences in class rankings, but small differences in grade-point averages.

Thompson writes that "concerns about intense, potentially unhealthy competition and students letting worries about rank drive their course selections,” has led to a decade-long decline among high schools crowning single valedictorians.
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5 Keys To Authentic Leadership

5 Keys To Authentic Leadership | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
But author Jeff Davis discusses in his new book, The Power of Authentic Leadership: Activating the 13 Keys to Achieving Prosperity Through Authenticity, that authentic leadership prowess is a cornerstone trait needed for success not just at work, but in life as well. Through conversations with Senators, billionaires, New York Times bestselling authors, and extremely successful business owners, coupled with his own research and application, Davis believes that authentic leadership is the essential ingredient for prosperity.

Hardly theoretical, authentic leadership is something that can be used and applied on a day-to-day basis, and it is needed now more than ever. In a nutshell, it’s more about being true to your word and demonstrating by example than it is about getting people to follow you or telling others what to do.
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Guiding student improvement without individual feedback

Guiding student improvement without individual feedback | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Feedback seems extremely powerful.  It is “among the most common features of successful teaching and learning” with an average effect size of 0.79, “twice the average effect of all other schooling effects (Hattie, 2012: 115-6).”  Such meta-analyses are problematic (see, for example, Wiliam, 2016) and more recent reviews have offered lower effect sizes, but the overall picture is clear: “Good feedback can significantly improve learning processes and outcomes (Shute, 2008).”  Anders Ericsson emphasises the importance of feedback and guided improvement in his work on expert performance: “Deliberate practice involves feedback and modification of efforts in response to that feedback (Ericsson and Pool, 2016: 99).”

Providing effective feedback is problematic however.  “While feedback is among the most powerful moderators of learning, its effects are among the most variable (Hattie, 2012: 115).”  Providing feedback successfully is a real challenge: “Get it wrong, and students give up, reject the feedback, or choose an easier goal (Wiliam, 2011: 119).”  This is illustrated most vividly in Kluger and DeNisi’s meta-analysis (1996), which found that studies of feedback showed an average effect size of 0.41, but that over 38% had negative effects.
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How Congress wastes school officials’ valuable time

How Congress wastes school officials’ valuable time | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
By Jay Mathews Columnist June 16
As states gain more power over public education, our state superintendents and education departments have a better chance of improving schools. We should not waste their time, something our elected representatives in Congress have done in a colossally clumsy way.
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Summer Math Loss

Summer Math Loss | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
On average, students lose approximately 2.6 months of learning in math over the summer — and teachers have to give up weeks of class time, or more, to make up for that loss.
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How To Apply The Brain Science Of Resilience To The Classroom

How To Apply The Brain Science Of Resilience To The Classroom | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A nonprofit called Turnaround for Children helps schools meet the needs of children facing poverty and adversity.
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Student-Driven Differentiation: Putting Student Voice Behind The Wheel

Student-Driven Differentiation: Putting Student Voice Behind The Wheel | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
I respect my students, just ask them!
A few months ago, I read The School Voice Report published by The Quaglia Institute. The report disclosed some very thought-provoking numbers. Most notably, after surveying over 60,000 students and 4,000 teachers, researchers found 99% of teachers surveyed reported they respect their students, while 58% of students surveyed reported feeling respected by their teachers. 

Additionally, of those surveyed, 82% of teachers said they actively seek out student opinions and ideas, yet only 47% of students feel teachers are willing to learn from them.

These discrepancies did not surprise me. I often see a disconnect between teachers' and students' perceptions of respect and listening. Many teachers will ask students for input and innocently, yet mistakenly, believe that just asking students questions is a clear indicator of the respect they have for them.  However, students feel respected when their thoughts and questions are heard and addressed accordingly. So, without action (whether that be a change or a valid explanation of why a change cannot occur) students do not necessarily feel respected. 

When differentiating instruction (student-driven or not), teachers are mindful that some students will master content and skills more quickly while some students will struggle to learn the same content and skills. With student-driven differentiation, rather than plan in advance how to address student needs, students' voices (collective and individual) are sought to craft the plan. Student-driven differentiation lends itself to teacher action which produces the ultimate result: students who feel respected, heard, and who learn. 
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Implementation: Follow-up Is the Secret to Effective Delegation

Implementation: Follow-up Is the Secret to Effective Delegation | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Strong leadership isn't just about delegating tasks; it is also about following up on those tasks and making sure they are done to your standards. People on my team sometimes feel like I ride them until things get done. However, I've learned the hard way that if you don't, things all too often get pushed aside. You have to keep reminding, checking and rechecking until you know things have been done the way you want. This is not obsessive-compulsive. It's called experienced.
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Why Teachers Should Help Students Learn Effective Study Strategies

Why Teachers Should Help Students Learn Effective Study Strategies | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
For teachers, the carefully controlled conditions of education research can seem ridiculous when the reality of the classroom involves regular interruptions, absences and general chaos. Professor John Dunlosky is trying to bridge these two worlds, intentionally studying the effectiveness of strategies that lab studies indicate are promising, but that don’t require special technology or extra resources. He is trying to figure out what few strategies could actually make a big difference for learners, and which ones are a waste of time.

“The most difficult aspect of this entire project was deciding which strategies we should evaluate,” Dunlosky said during a presentation at Learning and the Brain in San Francisco. There are hundreds of teaching strategies, most of which can be effective in certain situations. But Dunlosky was looking for strategies that are broadly applicable and don’t just aid memorization; he wanted to find the approaches that deepen understanding and help students transfer learning to new situations.
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How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture

How To Weave Growth Mindset Into School Culture | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Students also talk about the definitions of fixed and growth mindsets and then talk through various challenges from each perspective. When the school year starts, those lessons continue in the classroom. Every teacher in the Health and Medicine Academy has read Carol Dweck’s book, “Mindset,” and has discussed how to implement it in their classrooms. The school has moved to standards-based grading to emphasize that mistakes are part of learning and that understanding will come.
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Dr. Theresa Kauffman's curator insight, June 5, 11:04 AM
Engaging your students in a growth mindset will help them grow into an optimistic, problem solving learner.
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Increasing Salaries So Teachers Don't Have To Become Principals

Increasing Salaries So Teachers Don't Have To Become Principals | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Spencer Campbell spends much of his days walking the halls of Elk Ridge Middle School, checking breezeways for kids playing hooky, redirecting foot traffic between classes and checking on substitute teachers.

Campbell is one of two assistant principals at Elk Ridge, a school just south of Salt Lake City, Utah. It's his first year in the role and he looks the part. He's in his late 30s, sharply dressed, walks briskly and carries a walkie-talkie on his belt.

Before coming to education, Campbell owned a small business. He says he felt drawn to schools, though, so he got a master's degree and spent five years in the classroom as a teacher.
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You Just Had a Difficult Conversation at Work. Here’s What to Do Next

You Just Had a Difficult Conversation at Work. Here’s What to Do Next | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
the ability to follow up and build a relationship after a hard conversation matters just as much as the skill of tackling that initial difficult conversation.
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