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'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy

'Growth Mindset' Gaining Traction as School Improvement Strategy | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The concept aims to raise academic expectations by teaching students and teachers how to think of intelligence as something that can be improved through effort and experimentation.


"It's one thing to say all students can learn, but making them believe it—and do it—can require a 180-degree shift in students' and teachers' sense of themselves and of one another."

Mel Riddile's insight:

Key points on Mindsets:


  1. Teaching from a "growth mindset" orientation helps us to overcome the "soft bigotry of low expectations"?
  2. "Growth Mindset"—1. seek challenges, 2. learn from mistakes, and 3. keep faith in themselves in the face of failure. 
  3. Students with a growth mindset 1. improve more in academics and other skills, and can even be 2. less aggressive and 3. more socially engaged.
  4. "The thing is, kids don't mind failing," said David Dockterman, Scholastic's chief architect of learning sciences and an adjunct lecturer at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "When kids play video games, they fail 80 percent of the time. They look at failure there as an opportunity to learn."
  5. Teachers often confuse "teaching a growth mindset and exhorting kids to try hard," Ms. Dweck said. "You can't just tell a child to try hard without giving them strategies and supporting their efforts."
  6. Minor changes to student feedback—such as providing improvement-related praise vs. general encouragement—improved student persistence and math achievement, they found.
  7. Praising students' strategies, focus, effort, persistence, and improvement "takes the spotlight off fixed ability and puts it on the process of learning," Ms. Dweck said.
  8. It's important for teachers to go into detail when citing a student's correct answer.
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Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student

Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Our toolkit for educators includes videos, case studies and more that lead you to a forum for equity, personalization, smart data, collaboration and continuous improvement...
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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, July 3, 2014 9:53 AM

NASSP sponsored tools for success. Take a look at the many resources for new and experienced leaders alike.

Bradley Gomoluch's curator insight, July 22, 5:21 PM

Interesting learning modules and conversation about effective practices. 

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The 5 Critical Things That A Good Principal Never, Ever Delegates

The 5 Critical Things That A Good Principal Never, Ever Delegates | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

1. Hiring and Recruiting - You are responsible for getting the right people on the bus.

2. Setting Direction - The mission, vision, values and goals are critical to your school's success.

3. Support Your Staff - Teachers overwhelming say that they want a "supportive principal." 80% of your time should be spent focusing on what is right and spreading that throughout the school.

4. Consistent - Inconsistent parenting is worse than bad parenting and the same goes for leaders.

5. Leaders Grow Leaders - The only way to ensure that improvements are sustainable is to grow and develop leaders throughout your school.

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5 Tools That Demystify Text Complexity

5 Tools That Demystify Text Complexity | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Leverage these five web tools to help you teach with text complexity in mind. Steve Figurelli and Natalie Franzi provide useful tips and guidance.
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Less Tech, More Talk? Are You Moving To A Discussion-Based Classroom

Less Tech, More Talk? Are You Moving To A Discussion-Based Classroom | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Less Tech, More Talk: Moving To A Discussion-Based Classroom by Emily Long Sometimes I feel like the integration of new technology in the classroom is being…
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Great School Culture: It Starts With the Principal

Great School Culture: It Starts With the Principal | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
I don't talk about my school much to my friends who work elsewhere in the district because it frustrates them. They want what I have, a great environment. Schools like mine can happen anywhere if principals begin to accept the huge role they play in setting the tone for a great culture.
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How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn?

How Does Multitasking Change the Way Kids Learn? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Using tech tools that students are familiar with and already enjoy using is attractive to educators, but getting students focused on the project at hand m
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Chantal M. Simonelli's curator insight, August 23, 9:39 PM
Great article!
VéroniqueDeslandres's curator insight, August 24, 6:37 AM

Even when they know they're observed, student rapidly fall in media multitasking (answering msg or feeding Facebook wall) while doing 'important serious homework'... That's scary for learning efficiency!


extract "Evidence from psychology, cognitive science, and neuroscience suggests that when students multitask while doing schoolwork, their learning is far spottier and shallower than if the work had their full attention. They understand and remember less, and they have greater difficulty transferring their learning to new contexts."

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Principals! Are you building patterns of behavior shared across the school to create positive learning?

Principals! Are you building patterns of behavior shared across the school to create positive learning? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
This summer I had the privilege of traveling to Washington, D.C. with my superintendent. At our district's opening meeting with staff, he told a story about one morning when we decided to paddle a ...
Mel Riddile's insight:

Building patterns of behavior shared across the school to create positive learning. That's what culture is--it's what we do here!

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Students need writing time in every lesson!

Students need writing time in every lesson! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Let’s remember that the real work of writing workshop is writing.


As you begin your school year, I urge you to make room for a large chunk of writing time for every student every day. And I do mean actually writing. Not reading mentor texts, not talking to a writing partner, not uploading accompanying pictures to a blog. Yes, those are all important parts of the writing process, and yes, students need time to do those things also. Most importantly, though, students need time to write. Every single day.

As an instructional coach, I will be cognizant of ‘actual time spent writing’ in our classrooms.  I suggest collecting data on this throughout the year. Choose a student at random and spend an entire writing workshop just observing that student. Have a timer handy and record how much time that student spent actually writing on any given day. Or, if you have an instructional coach in your building, ask your coach to collect the data for you. Keep in mind that writers do often stop to think, to reread, to envision. Writing doesn’t always look like pencils scratching across paper or fingers clicking on keys.  It does, however, look very different from sharpening a pencil or talking to a writing partner.

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High School Principals! The Research Is Clear: Long Hours Backfire for You and Your Staff

High School Principals! The Research Is Clear: Long Hours Backfire for You and Your Staff | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The high cost of overwork.


Considerable evidence shows that overwork is not just neutral — it hurts us and the companies we work for. Numerous studies by Marianna Virtanen of the Finnish Institute of Occupational Health and her colleagues (as well as other studies) have found that overwork and the resulting stress can lead to all sorts of health problems, including impaired sleep, depression, heavy drinking, diabetes, impaired memory, and heart disease. Of course, those are bad on their own. But they’re also terrible for a company’s bottom line, showing up as absenteeism, turnover, and rising health insurance costs. Even the Scroogiest of employers, who cared nothing for his employees’ well-being, should find strong evidence here that there are real, balance-sheet costs incurred when employees log crazy hours.

If your job relies on interpersonal communication, making judgment calls, reading other people’s faces, or managing your own emotional reactions — pretty much all things that the modern office requires — I have more bad news. Researchers have found that overwork (and its accompanying stress and exhaustion) can make all of these things more difficult.

Even if you enjoy your job and work long hours voluntarily, you’re simply more likely to make mistakes when you’re tired — and most of us tire more easily than we think we do. Only 1-3% of the population can sleep five or six hours a night without suffering some performance drop-off. Moreover, for every 100 people who think they’re a member of this sleepless elite, only five actually are. The research on the performance-destroying effects of sleeplessness alone should make everyone see the folly of the all-nighter.

Mel Riddile's insight:

"Depletion" has a major impact on principal's performance and in principal turnover.

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Mindsets Affect What Students Do With Feedback

A passing acquaintance with the notion of mindset—though an excellent start—doesn’t fully convey the richness of Dweck’s idea, however. The influence of mindset shows up in students’ thinking and behavior in so many ways, one of which I want to focus on today. That is the effect of mindset on how students handle feedback.

Understanding and acting on feedback is absolutely critical to the process of mastering academic knowledge and skills. Unfortunately, although parents and teachers may givefeedback to students, that doesn’t necessarily mean that students get it—that is, get it in the sense of really listening to it, striving to understand it, and applying it to their subsequent efforts.

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Principals Use Classroom Walkthroughs To Build School Culture

Principals Use Classroom Walkthroughs To Build School Culture | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
With Moss and Brookhart's book "Formative Classroom Walkthroughs," educator teams can transform classroom walkthroughs into collaborations that share responsibility and help build a positive school...
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6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups

6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Grouping students is easy; creating effective student groups is less so.

The following infographic from Mia MacMeekin seeks to provide some ideas to help make group work easier in your classroom. The strength of this particular graphic is in the range of the ideas. The first tip refers teachers to Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal development, which frames student ability in terms of a range: what they can do unassisted, what they can do with the support of a More Knowledgeable Other (MKO), and what they cannot do even with support. This is different for each student, and understanding these ranges for students can help inform grouping decisions, whether you’re using a peer instruction model, ability grouping, or another approach.

Via John Evans
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harloff's curator insight, August 27, 3:48 AM

Nice infographics av very informative.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, August 27, 7:14 AM

Facilitando el trabajo en el aula...6 Tips For Creating Effective Student Groups - TeachThought | @scoopit via @joevans http://sco.lt/...

Miep Carstensen's curator insight, August 28, 5:40 PM

This is a great info graphic, but I would also add the importance of praising effort.

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What We Know About Student Motivation: Changing Mindsets

What We Know About Student Motivation: Changing Mindsets | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new report from the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching reviews what we know about student motivation.


""Data clearly suggests that it's not just academic ability that determines motivation, but also the capacities and character traits like resilience, self-confidence and tenacity that help students stay the course as the emotional path grows rougher and the learning curve steeper.

Students with "growth mindsets," by contrast, believe that with effort, their ability and performance can improve.

8. "Mindsets apply not only to academics -- to the attitudes that students have about their intellectual abilities -- they also apply to what students believe is their rightful place in school."

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Why the Best Teachers Won't Ditch the Lecture

Why the Best Teachers Won't Ditch the Lecture | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Recently, Stephen Kosslyn, the founding Dean of Minerva Schools, offered a great explanation of
why active learning is superior to lectures. While I admire and appreciate radical innovations in educational models like Minerva, I’d like to share a point of view that presents the lecture and act
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Classroom Management: 3 Important Big-Picture Questions

Classroom Management: 3 Important Big-Picture Questions | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Before getting into the minutiae of classroom management, consider how you organize your space, what learning looks like, and how you're building relationships with families.
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jilian stambolich's curator insight, August 27, 9:02 AM

You can know what people do and say but not what they think... but building relationships and honouring others voice can sure get you closer to a deeper understanding of others. 

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"Reading proficiency by third grade is the most significant predictor of high school graduation and career success"

"Reading proficiency by third grade is the most significant predictor of high school graduation and career success" | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Even on a "Busy Day" for "Busy People," reading is a wonderful way to expand children's worlds and to bond children and caregivers, and one that can start at birth. It also is a crucial way to help children gain the language and literacy skills needed for a good start in school.
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Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, August 26, 3:55 PM

PER THIS ARTICLE CHILDREN THAT ARE IN SCHOOL BUT BY THE THIRD GRADE HAVE NOT MET "READING PROFICIENCY" BY THE THIRD GRADE IS THE MOST SIGNIFICANT PREDITORS OF HIGH SCHOOL DROP OUT AND CAREER FAILURE BUT THOSE THAT HAVE "READING PROFICIENCY " BY THE THIRD GRADE IS THE MOST SIGNIFICANT PREDITOR OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION AND CAREER SUCCESS, WHY IS IT THAT SOME NC CHILDREN ARE SETUP ON THE DOWN LOW TO BE DROP OUTS AND FAILURES INSTEAD OF HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATES AND SUCCESSFUL BECAUSE THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA HAVE EDUCATION PROBLEMS THAT ARE NOT THE CHILDREN/STUDENTS FAULT BUT THE FACT THE GOVERNING BODIES ARE LOOKING OUT FOR THE BEST INTEREST OF THE PUBLIC SCHOOLS AND IT OFFICIALS AND EMPLOYEES INSTEAD OF THE CHILDREN THEY ARE OR ARE SUPPOSE TO BE EDUCATING. BRINGS LIGHT TO WHY THE EDUCATION PROBLEMS ARE ALLOWED TO CONTINUE BY PUTTING A BANDAGE ON A CUT OF A MAJOR ARTERY THAT IS BLEEDING THE EDUCATION OUT OF SO MANY CHILDREN UNTO DEATH.  IS IT A CRIME OR NOT?  IT IS A CRYING SHAME NO DOUBT! THE STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA IS PAYING FOR SOME CHILDREN TO DROP OUT OF SCHOOL EVEN BEFORE THEY ALLOW SOME CHILDREN TO DROP IN! WHAT IS THE DOLLARS AND CENTS OF THAT DESERVED BUDGET CUT!

Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, August 26, 8:45 PM

The ARI has used this research for years... Nice to have some confirmation~

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Will Illinois Student Discipline Law Make Schools Safer?

Will Illinois Student Discipline Law Make Schools Safer? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The new law, which was passed with bipartisan support from Illinois lawmakers, is designed to make suspensions and expulsions a last resort.
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3 Reasons Why Teachers Should Film Themselves Teaching

3 Reasons Why Teachers Should Film Themselves Teaching | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Teachers should video themselves teaching for many reasons, but here are 3 of the most powerful. Sadly, because of hostile school climates, many teachers will never be able to use the process for everything it's worth.
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Alison Fox's curator insight, August 25, 6:01 PM

Whilst the beginning of this article is quite shocking in its hands-off approach to certifying teachers, the teacher themself still seems to see the potential for videoing to support their development as a reflective practitioner. Observation as self-enquiry. 

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Why We Really Have A Teacher Shortage

Why We Really Have A Teacher Shortage | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

"David Gamberg is the superintendent of the Greenport and Southold districts on Long Island’s east end. He has long worried that the politically hostile environment for teachers is contributing to the shortage we are seeing today. “I suspect that a range of issues conspire to exacerbate the problem. Certainly the ongoing, nationwide attack on teachers and unions is near or at the very top of the list of factors driving people away.”

What Gamberg suspects has evidence. There are frequent stories about public school teachers who are leaving the profession or taking early retirement because of the toll of working in a ‘test and punish’ environment. A November NEA survey reported that nearly 50% of all teachers are considering leaving due to standardized testing. Of equal concern is how frequently educators are cautioning young adults about entering the profession."

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Tips On Changing Middle School Behaviors, Einstein-Style

Tips On Changing Middle School Behaviors, Einstein-Style | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Sometimes students are stuck through no real fault of their own - family situations or access to education may have caused them to slip behind. However, it's just good old-fashioned stubbornness, with a dash of insecurity, that results in underachievement. That's where Einstein comes in.
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Are There Really Too Few Teachers?

Are There Really Too Few Teachers? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

For a number of reasons, it appears that fewer of our best and brightest young people are becoming teachers. Enrollment in teacher prep programs — both short-term ones like Teach for America and the more traditional college education majors — are on the decline. TFA has experienced a 21 percent decline in applications since 2013; federal Title II data on teacher prep programs shows a 31 percent decline in enrollment since 2008; and enrollment in graduate education programs has decreased by about 3 percent annually since 2008. These application and enrollment drops have been well documented by the likes of the New York TimesNPR and Education Week.

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Mindset Kit for Teachers, Parents, Students

A free resource for educators and parents who want to foster learning mindsets such as growth mindset. Follow lessons and practices from experts and members of our community.
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Are You Scaffolding or Rescuing?

Are You Scaffolding or Rescuing? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Consider one of the fundamental progressions of scaffolding which, in its most basic form, involves the following continuum of instructional steps:

1. I Do/You Watch - teacher models the task and the student observes

2. I Do/You Help - teacher does the majority of the work while the student helps

3. You Do/I Help - student does the majority of the work while the teacher helps

4. You Do/I Watch - student does the task while the teacher observes
 

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Principals get to the ‘why’ of discipline problems

Principals get to the ‘why’ of discipline problems | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new guide outlines steps districts can take to improve practices.


With schools across California and the nation working to reform discipline practices — either voluntarily or under legal pressure — the guide, “Addressing the Root Causes of Disparities in School Discipline: An Educator’s Action Planning Guide,” is intended as a tool to help schools “look for the whole story” behind who is disciplined and why. Produced by the American Institutes for Research for the U.S. Department of Education, the guide offers schools a data-informed road map for improving school climate and reducing discipline disparities.

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Literacy in the Digital Age: Five Sites With High-Quality Informational Text

Literacy in the Digital Age: Five Sites With High-Quality Informational Text | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Engage your students with high-quality informational text that allows them to explore their own interests. Natalie Franzi and Steve Figurelli share five fabulous websites.
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PD is Not Effective at Helping Teachers Improve

PD is Not Effective at Helping Teachers Improve | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new study by the advocacy group TNTP finds that PD activities don’t seem to factor into why some teachers get better while others don’t.


"We've known for a long time that a lot of PD is not actually effective at helping teachers improve their craft, but there have not been changes in this sector of the marketplace," said Heather C. Hill, a professor of education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. "Part of it is that we don't have good ways of tracking what works and doesn't work, so we don't point to things that work or don't work, and teachers keep signing up for the same things.

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