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Principal of the Year Focused on STEM, Business Partnerships

Principal of the Year Focused on STEM, Business Partnerships | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
NASSP's principal of the year is Sheila Harrity, of Massachusetts
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Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
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Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student

Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Our toolkit for educators includes videos, case studies and more that lead you to a forum for equity, personalization, smart data, collaboration and continuous improvement...
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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, July 3, 2014 9:53 AM

NASSP sponsored tools for success. Take a look at the many resources for new and experienced leaders alike.

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The Power of Trust Between Principals and Teachers

The Power of Trust Between Principals and Teachers | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

In an address to secondary school leaders in the UK, Vicki spoke about the importance of trust between principals and teachers--and how that trust creates an environment to help teachers and students be their best. The speech highlighted the critical role principals play in instructional leadership, school design, teacher support, and student success.

Mel Riddile's insight:

"Teachers tell me one of the most important supports for a teacher is to have a great principal. Great principals are devoted to their role as instructional leaders. They believe in their teachers, they support them, and they accept no excuses."

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Too much homework lowers performance

Too much homework lowers performance | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Homework improves students' math and science performance, up to a point. But many students may go over that point, a new study finds.
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Why America’s obsession with STEM education is dangerous

Why America’s obsession with STEM education is dangerous | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Alongside technical skills, America needs the creativity that a liberal arts education provides.
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Use Power Standards to Streamline Your Curriculum

Use Power Standards to Streamline Your Curriculum | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Less Is More: 4 Strategies To Streamline Your Curriculum


Use Power Standards

According to edglossary.org, Power Standards refer to “a subset of learning standards that educators have determined to be the highest priority or most important for students to learn.” The big idea? They explain that “it is often impossible for teachers to cover every academic standard over the course of a school year, given the depth and breadth of state learning standards. Power standards, therefore, are the prioritized academic expectations that educators determine to be the most critical and essential for students to learn…”

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TED Talks on Being A Leader

TED Talks on Being A Leader | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

The TED list below features some really wonderful talks on how to be a leader and how to inspire others to action. If you have sometime this weekended you might want to watch some of them. our favourite talk in the list is Simon Sinek’s “How Great Leaders Inspire Action”.

1- How great leaders inspire action by Simon Sinek

Mel Riddile's insight:

Check out Simon Sinek's Golden Circle.

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5 Great Formative Assessment Strategies For Teachers

5 Great Formative Assessment Strategies For Teachers | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
This article feature 5 easy and effective formative assessment strategies to use with your students.
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How do schools respond to competition? Better Academics or Better Marketing/Recruiting?

How do schools respond to competition? Better Academics or Better Marketing/Recruiting? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
School-choice is built on the philosophy that competition forces schools to improve, but a new study shows that school leaders are more likely to improve recruiting than academics.
Mel Riddile's insight:
Research: Charters More Likely To Focus On Marketing Than Academics.

The Washington Post (3/26, Brown) reports that according to a new study from the Education Research Alliance for New Orleans, charter officials “are less likely to work on improving academics than to use other tactics in their efforts to attract students.” The study examined 30 New Orleans charters, and found that only one third “said they competed for students by trying to improve their academic programs or operations.” Meanwhile, leaders at 25 “said they competed by marketing their existing programs.”

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School Counselors Play Key Role in Transitioning Students to Post-Secondary Ed. & Training

School Counselors Play Key Role in Transitioning Students to Post-Secondary Ed. & Training | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new report from the National Association for College Admission Counseling shows administrators value time spent on college counseling, although most guidance departments devote less than 20 percent of their time to that task.
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When the Internet Delivers Its Own Content, What’s Left for the Teacher?

When the Internet Delivers Its Own Content, What’s Left for the Teacher? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
When kids can get their lessons from the Internet, what's left for classroom instructors to do?
Mel Riddile's insight:

"So if you want to be a teacher," I tell the college student, "you better be a super-teacher."

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Gizelle Alexander's curator insight, March 28, 4:23 PM

I've seen the need for this for quite some time. I have never felt that Teacher as Dictator or Boss as Dictator really honored people who deserve to be given enough space to find their own motivations, their own learning styles and their own place in society. I'm glad Web 2.0 has made "teacher as facilitator" possible, 

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How brainy are you about brains? A neuroscience quiz.

How brainy are you about brains? A neuroscience quiz. | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
We have a winner in the 2015 USA National Brain Bee Champion: Soren Christensen, a ninth-grader at Thomas Jefferson High School for Science and Technology in Alexandria, Va. Here are some of the questions he had to answer -- plus practice questions.
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Do snow days hurt student progress? A Harvard professor says no.

Do snow days hurt student progress? A Harvard professor says no. | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
New study found that student absenteeism on days schools are open is a much bigger problem.
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Watching Videos Like You Read a Book: 40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies

Watching Videos Like You Read a Book: 40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
40 Viewing Comprehension Strategies: Watching Videos Like You Read A Book
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The Mismanagement of Change (And 5 Ways to Get It Right)

The Mismanagement of Change (And 5 Ways to Get It Right) | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
This post focuses on how to maintain a sense of certainty and how to allow employees to assign personal significance & meaning to change.
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The Right Questions

The Right Questions | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Beth Dichter's insight:

Learn about the power of question formulation in this post. The information comes from the Right Question Institute, and provides a great overview of how to teach your students to ask good questions. The post is split into the following sections:

* The Power of Question Formulation

* Question Formulation in Practice (which includes)

   - Step 1: The teacher designs a question focus

   - Step 2: Students produce questions

   - Step 3: Students work with open-ended and close-ended questions

   - Step 4: Students prioritize questions

   - Step 5: Teacher and students discuss next steps for using the questions

   - Step 6: Students reflect

* A Catalyst for Deeper Learning

* A Small but Significant Shift

There are also some examples of the question formulation technique from classroom teachers.

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Strong Leaders, Confident Teachers are the key to innovating schools ~ OECD

Strong Leaders, Confident Teachers are the key to innovating schools ~ OECD | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

According to the OECD, these are the three ingredients for innovating schools and systems:

  • Leadership: strong leaders who establish optimal conditions in their schools
  • Teachers: Confident and capable in their practice
  • Culture: An openness to innovation
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The real stuff of schooling: How to teach students to apply knowledge

The real stuff of schooling: How to teach students to apply knowledge | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

An excerpt from a new book on teaching and learning by a veteran teacher Larry Ferlazzo

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Scaffolding for Student Success: Micro Teaching

Scaffolding for Student Success: Micro Teaching | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

By looking closely at video together, we can all learn and improve our practices. In this Observation Challenge, we're focusing on scaffolding as a strategy for moving students toward understanding a complex concept.

How to Get Started

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Too Much Homework May Hurt Teens' Test Scores

Too Much Homework May Hurt Teens' Test Scores | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Study found more than 90 minutes a night linked to lower performance in math, science


Regular, Independent Math And Science Homework Yield Best Results.

HealthDay (3/27, Preidt) reports that a new Spanish study finds that students that do homework regularly and independently yield the best test results. The study also notes that while students that did up to 70 minutes of homework showed dramatic gains over their peers with less work, gains between 70 and 90 minutes were minimal and students with over 90 minutes of daily homework saw test results decline.

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What You Might Not Know About the Gender Gap in Reading

What You Might Not Know About the Gender Gap in Reading | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new analysis peels back common wisdom about why boys may lag girls in reading achievement.
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Micro Teaching: Using Video to Enhance Instruction

Micro Teaching: Using Video to Enhance Instruction | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Using video is an excellent option to truly see how we engage with our students, but too often it won't happen because of a lack of trust in the building. Here are some options to overcome those obstacles.
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What Does Math Look Like In Today's Classroom?

What Does Math Look Like In Today's Classroom? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Math in today's classrooms: How does it look? How are teachers making shifts in the way they teach math? We asked educators from our Teaching Channel community and here's what they said.
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Art teacher is evaluated by students’ math standardized test scores

Art teacher is evaluated by students’ math standardized test scores | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Many teachers are evaluated by the test scores of students and subjects they don't teach.
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Most States Give 10% Less To Poorer Districts

Most States Give  10% Less To Poorer Districts | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
High-poverty school districts receive an average of 10 percent less per student in state and local funding than districts with few students in poverty, a new report finds. However, some states have managed to close that gap.


Most States Give Less To Poorer Districts.
The Christian Science Monitor (3/25, Kharadoo) reports that school districts serving students in poverty receive less than other districts, according to a Thursday report from The Education Trust. The Monitor notes that funding gaps “vary widely from state to state,” and that while some states have “good showing[s]” and give more to challenged districts, nine states supply “at least 100 percent more” to low-poverty districts. There has been a decades-long push for more even funding levels, and lawsuits against funding formulas have been a major driver in the “shift[] toward equity.” Districts serving the highest levels of African-Americans, Latinos, and Native Americans received nearly 15 percent less funding than districts with the fewest minorities, contradictory to the ideal of “equality of opportunity.”
        Minnesota Near Top Of Low-Income District Funding, But Retains Inequality. The St. Paul (MN) Pioneer Press (3/26, Verges) reports that the report showed Minnesota is “among the best” at providing poorer schools with extra funding, but that “it may not be evident in test scores,” where the state has one of the country’s biggest race and income gaps. The state is second only to Ohio in its share of in-state funding that reaches high-poverty districts, but the paper notes that the report does not include Federal funds that target low-income students.

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Teachers Using Problems of Practice (POPs) in Reflection and Collaboration

Teachers Using Problems of Practice (POPs) in Reflection and Collaboration | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

One of the mechanisms to engage teachers in reflection and collaboration around implementation of the common core is through a Problems of Practice protocol, abbreviated POPs.  

Every 6 to 8 weeks 3 of the 6 teachers present a problem of practice to the whole group, receive warm and cool feedback, and change an upcoming lesson based on this experience and their own reflection.

The protocol we are using has gone through many drafts, but here is a video of the process and a copy of our latest version of the protocol:

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Jovan Jovanovic's curator insight, March 29, 1:10 PM

адд иоур увид ...