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When I visit classrooms or wander the aisles of Target, I do not feel that American kids are over-burdened by self-regulation.

When I visit classrooms or wander the aisles of Target, I do not feel that American kids are over-burdened by self-regulation. | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The cover story of latest New Republic wonders whether American educators have fallen in blind love with self-control. Author Elizabeth Weil thinks we have. Titled “American Schools Are Failing...
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Leading Schools
Improving Schools Through Enhanced Leadership
Curated by Mel Riddile
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Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student

Leading Success: Dynamic Solutions for Every School, Each Student | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Our toolkit for educators includes videos, case studies and more that lead you to a forum for equity, personalization, smart data, collaboration and continuous improvement...
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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, July 3, 2014 9:53 AM

NASSP sponsored tools for success. Take a look at the many resources for new and experienced leaders alike.

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Dan Pink: How Teachers Can Sell Love of Learning to Students

Dan Pink: How Teachers Can Sell Love of Learning to Students | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
As education grows and changes educators have the opportunity to change the way they envision their roles and their classrooms.
Mel Riddile's insight:

“We have a lot of learned behavior of compliance, and hunger for external rewards and no real engagement.”

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What Motivates A Student’s Interest in Reading and Writing: Why is not a waste of time!

What Motivates A Student’s Interest in Reading and Writing: Why is not a waste of time! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Educator Larry Ferlazzo details how to make reading and writing relevant to students lives in order to motivate them.


"I would suggest that teachers explicitly connecting what is being taught in school to student goals—by pointing it out themselves or by drawing it out of students (which, as Chapter 1 pointed out, appears to have less damaging potential)—can have a place in class, but also has to be kept in its place. In my experience, we will get fewer “Why are we learning this?” questions in learning environments that promote autonomy, competence, relatedness, or are connected to student interest."

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Context Matters: What psychology tells us about student achievement

Context Matters: What psychology tells us about student achievement | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Children reproduce the character of their schools and the society around them.


"If we want to make our schools more effective, we have to redirect our energy and focus on ensuring that they are supportive settings. “You can do it, you belong, and your efforts will pay off,” must be the message and reality conveyed to all students in every classroom."

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Study: Collaboration with middle schools key to student success in high school

California students have a greater chance of succeeding in high school if their school collaborates closely with their middle school before the students even enter 9th grade, according to a new report.

“Aligning curriculum and increasing communication between middle grades and high school staff about curriculum and instructional strategies” is key, according to the report issued by the Comprehensive Education Center at WestEd. “Communication with teachers at feeder schools about incoming students also appears to be an important component of a successful transition plan.”

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Emotional Intelligence Doesn’t Translate Across Borders

Emotional Intelligence Doesn’t Translate Across Borders | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Sometimes “not bad” means “really great.”


Emotions vary tremendously across cultures.

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Life, Light, Action! Videos for Storytelling

Life, Light, Action! Videos for Storytelling | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
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HOTS in Action: Crispus Attucks' Obituary

HOTS in Action: Crispus Attucks' Obituary | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

Here are a few examples of HOTS in action:

  • From reading The Adventures of Ulysses (a retelling of The Odyssey), we learned that one trait of a hero is to lead by example. We’ve been identifying those in our portfolio of obituaries who share that characteristic. (Answer: Many.)
  • Each obituary builds our vocabulary – definitions, of course, but also how words relate: for instance, we established how paternalmaternalsororal, and fraternal connect by reading about Adolphous Bullock, Mary Moon Wilson, Kip Tiernan, and both Michael Kennedy and Edward Walsh.
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    Principals Getting Into Classrooms

    Principals Getting Into Classrooms | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    Getting Into Classrooms
    1. Block out time: I find that when I make the effort to block out time for observations, I can tell the urgent demands to wait until I am done with my observations. Perhaps even more importantly, if I share my plan with my secretary, she can hold at bay many of the urgent demands and sometimes solve them for me.
    2. Set a goal and announce in publicly: Just as a goal is a wish unless it is written down, when we share our goals with others, they can help us reach them. I have found that it is helpful to let my teachers know of my observation goal to visit their classroom every day and enlist their help in making it happen. If I know that a teacher is expecting me to be in his classroom that day, it is more likely that I will make every effort to be there. After all, I do not want to let the teacher down or show lack of professionalism or poor planning.
    3. Set up a routine: This helps me because I don't have to think about a habit. It's easy to plan for, and the teachers and students know that I will not be in my office, so they do not look for me at those times. Perhaps the greatest benefit I see is the change seen in the perspective of the teachers.
    Mel Riddile's insight:

    4. Success Every Day: Set up a routine and set goals that you can meet every day, even days in which everything seems to go wrong.

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    NASSP Center for New Principals's curator insight, April 19, 11:13 PM

    Knowing what is going on in classrooms is the key to effective instructional leadership; Here's how!

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    More Schools Offer Breakfast in Classroom

    "THE SCIENCE

    Studies haven't shown a link between eating breakfast and academic performance, but supporters say there is a common-sense element to the initiative. The day before a big test, for example, parents are routinely reminded to make sure their children eat a good breakfast.

    Anecdotally, some districts report improved attendance and fewer visits to the school nurse.

    Charles Basch, a professor at Columbia University's Teachers College, said school breakfast is one of several factors with an effect on a child's ability to learn.

    "There's not just one thing that's going to be a magic bullet," he said."

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    The Power of Teacher Expectations

    The Power of Teacher Expectations | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    Mr Laing was my year 8 Maths teacher. He was a rare breed indeed. He helped me, and my fellow pimple-clad teens, find mathematics...
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    Principals Play Key Role in School Improvement

    Principals Play Key Role in School Improvement | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

    Teachers can’t do it all. The question of who leads a school is crucial.


    Principals Said To Play Key Role In School Improvement.

    Will Miller, president of the Wallace Foundation, writes in an op-ed in the New York Times (4/17, Subscription Publication) on the importance of principals for improving schools. He argues the need for getting great principals into “the schools that need them most — those with poor and minority students.” He also cites a study “covering 180 schools in nine states,” by “researchers from the University of Minnesota and the University of Toronto” concluding, “We have not found a single case of a school improving its student achievement record in the absence of talented leadership.” He argues that this means there should be much greater investment in training and development for principals.

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    NASSP Center for New Principals's curator insight, April 19, 11:09 PM

    This is a great op-ed and very affirming for principals.  Great WALLACE FOUNDATION work!

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    New brain science shows brain differences between poor and affluent kids

    New brain science shows brain differences between poor and affluent kids | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    Research adds to the debate about the growing academic gap between poor and rich students.


    The Washington Post (4/16, Layton) reports that neuroscientists have showed in a new study that the cerebral cortexes of affluent children are larger than those of their poorer counterparts. Theories posited by Noble and another scientist studying the matter include that poorer families lack the nutrition and healthcare needed to develop the brain and that poorer children undergo more stressful lives, which may “inhibit healthy brain development.” University College London psychologist James Thompson is paraphrased positing that intelligence has “a genetic component” and that less able, poorer families pass on their genes. The research and its implications are timely, as policymakers such as Education Secretary Arne Duncan seek to direct funding to promoting better education, especially in early education.

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    Index Indicates Most High Schools Fall Short of Challenging Students

    Index Indicates Most High Schools Fall Short of Challenging Students | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    A survey of schools that made The Washington Post's Most Challenging High School list shows many schools still have rules that keep students from signing up for AP, IB, and AICE courses.
    Mel Riddile's insight:

    "The yardstick for making the The Washington Post's list of Most Challenging High Schools is simple: A school needs to have half of its juniors and half of its seniors take one Advanced Placement course and exam in each of those years."

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    Why Reading Aloud to Older Children Is Valuable

    Why Reading Aloud to Older Children Is Valuable | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    Reading aloud to older children -- even up to age 14, who can comfortably read to themselves -- has benefits both academic and emotional, according to researchers.
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    Math@Work: Connecting Math to 21st Century Careers

    Math@Work: Connecting Math to 21st Century Careers | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

    Web series teaches students about homebuilding and math 
    Scholastic and TV host Ty Pennington are working together to help students connect math with real-world careers through their new webisode series, Math@Work: Math Meets Homebuilding. The 15-minute videos, available at no charge on Scholastic's site, feature Pennington showing student builders how to apply math to projects such as installing solar panels and building a walkway for a home.

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    Parents should use the threat of opt-out to extort more demands from schools? - US News

    Parents should use the threat of opt-out to extort more demands from schools? -  US News | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

    The author contends that "Parents should use the threat of test refusal to demand a well-rounded education for their kids."

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    7 Simple Steps to Maintain Classroom Culture

    7 Simple Steps to Maintain Classroom Culture | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

    Many schools across the country just completed their last major break of the year, which means it is one mad dash to the finish line. It is a time when teachers and students alike begin to look forward to beach chairs, backyard bbqs, and hitting snooze on the alarm. As much promise as all this forward thinking holds, it can take one’s eye off the ball and wreak havoc on a classroom culture.

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    Common Misconceptions about Mindset, Rigor, and Grit

    Common Misconceptions about Mindset, Rigor, and Grit | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    Many teachers and schools who say they believe in fostering a growth mindset in their students still have an environment that encourages a fixed mindset.
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    Your Brain on Books: 10 Ways Reading Affects You

    Your Brain on Books: 10 Ways Reading Affects You | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    Diving into a great novel can be an immersive experience that makes your mind come alive. Want to give your brain a workout? Open a foreign language novel.
    Mel Riddile's insight:
    Beth Dichter's insight:

    Do your learners know what happens when the read, or when stories are read to them. This post, from the Open Education Database, provides a visual (that you may want to print out and share with learners and their families) as well as 10 ways that reading helps your brain workout. The list is below. 

    * We make photos in our mind, even without being prompted.

    * Spoken word can put your brain to work.

    * Reading about experiences is almost the same as living it.

    * Different styles of reading create different patterns in the brain.

    * New languages can grow your brain.

    * Your brain adapts to reading e-books in seven days.

    * E-books lack in spatial navigability.

    * Story structure encourages our brain to think in sequence, expanding our attention spans.

    * Reading changes your brain structure (in a good way)).

    * Deep reading makes us more empathetic.

    To learn more about each of these points click through to the post.

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    Higher-Order Questions for Higher Order Thinking: Blooms

    What happened after...?
    How many...?
    Who was it that...?
    Can you name the...? Describe what happened at...? Who spoke to...? 

    Click here to edit the title

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    The 'Crab Bucket Effect': Snuffing out our own progress | Dangerously Irrelevant

    The 'Crab Bucket Effect': Snuffing out our own progress | Dangerously Irrelevant | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

    By Scott McLeod

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    Please, No More Professional Development!

    Please, No More Professional Development! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    Professional development are two words that teachers dread. But what if leaders and teachers changed the focus and followed this 5 point plan?
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    The Principal-Counselor Relationship

    The Principal-Counselor Relationship | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
    Principal-counselor relationships are critical to student success


    "We hope that by sharing the results of our research – which we have undertaken in collaboration with the National Association of Secondary School Principals (NASSP) and the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) – we can inspire principals, counselors and other educators to examine the principal-counselor relationships in their own schools. This can help them determine how they might be able to work together effectively to improve the educational outcomes for all students."

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    NASSP Center for New Principals's curator insight, April 19, 11:12 PM

    This might be a good time of the year to see if you are making the best use of the talents and skills of your school counselors, or is you should spend some time this summer reviewing and revising their job descriptions......

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    Literacy Lessons Learned - YouTube

    Published on Apr 9, 2015

    Literacy is the most important—and perhaps most difficult—initiative to implement in a secondary school. Yet new, more rigorous state standards view literacy as a shared responsibility across all disciplines. This makes implementing a schoolwide literacy movement even more critical.

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