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Do teachers know best when it comes to Homework?

Do teachers know best when it comes to Homework? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The Case Against Homework: The truth, according to Sara Bennett and Nancy Kalish, is that there is almost no evidence that homework helps elementary school students achieve academic success and little more that it helps older students.


"Don't teachers know best when it comes to homework?


A:   No. When we started researching the subject, we were shocked to learn that:


  1. Most teachers have never studied homework in their teacher education courses.
  2. Few are aware of the studies showing that homework has little or no correlation with academic success in elementary school or that overwhelming amounts of homework have a negative impact on learning in all grades.
  3. Few teachers have learned how to devise good assignments, how to decide how much homework to give, and whether to involve parents. In fact, according to Gerald LeTendre, associate professor of education policy studies at Pennsylvania State University. "There's no adequate training of new teachers in homework at all. It's considered an afterthought." Just as alarming, once they begin teaching, they get little guidance from their schools.
  4. Only 35 percent of (schools) actually have written homework policies.
Mel Riddile's insight:

Key Point:


"the number of math problems in a homework assignment should be limited to five."

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Formative Assessment Works

by Mel Riddile


Formative assessment or assessment for learning is a proven strategy to improve student achievement.

Mel Riddile's insight:

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


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LET Team's curator insight, March 19, 2016 6:44 PM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.


• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.


• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.


• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn 


 


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


 


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


 


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


 


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


 


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


 


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.


• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.


• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words


• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).


• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).


• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


 


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


 


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned


• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved


• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool


• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model


• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Andy Fetchik's curator insight, March 21, 2016 11:34 AM

“Formative assessment is a planned process in which teachers or students use assessment-based evidence to adjust what they're currently doing.

• Formative assessment is a planned process in which assessment-elicited evidence of students' status is used by teachers to adjust their ongoing instructional procedures or by students to adjust their current learning tactics.

• Because formative assessment has been shown to improve students' in-class learning, many educators have adopted it in the hope that it will also raise their students' performances on accountability tests.

• The expanded use of formative assessment is supported not only by instructional logic but also by the conclusions of a well-conceived and skillfully implemented meta-analysis by Paul Black and Dylan Wiliam.” (Popham, 2008)After synthesizing over 250 publications, Black and Wiliam, concluded that formative assessment is perhaps the most effective educational practice when it comes to improving academic achievement. In addition, formative assessment has a disproportionately beneficial impact on low‐achieving students. http://www.hanoverresearch.com/media/The-Impact-of-Formative-Assessment-and-Learning-Intentions-on-Student-Achievement.pdfIn ;


In 2009, John Hattie published a meta-meta-analysis of education research called Visible Learning: A synthesis of over 800 meta-analyses relating to achievement. In that study, Hattie found that formative assessment, when done correctly, had the highest effect size on student learning compared with other classroom strategies.


In recent years, neuroscientists have reported that retrieval practice—recalling and applying previously learning—had a huge impact (as much as 50%) on student retention of learned content. Combining retrieval practice and formative assessment can significantly reduce forgetting and increase retention of lesson content.


Each school’s instructional framework provides teachers with numerous opportunities to use formative assessments in the beginning and ending of a lesson as well as when engaging students and during student practice in the body of the lesson. Teachers use formative assessment to see if the students have mastered the content of the lesson—did they get it?


Note that mastery means that the students can demonstrate both that they ‘know’ the content and that they can apply what they learned to future or past learning.


Formative Assessment in the Beginning and Ending of the Lesson


• Purposeful Learning – The expectation that all activities be purposeful means that teachers always have something to check on or assess for understanding.

• Focusing (Beginning) – Ask students to demonstrate mastery of the previous lesson through bell ringer, do now, or warm up.

• Knowing the Lesson’s Purpose (Beginning) – Ask students to repeat the learning target or essential question in their own words

• Ask students to predict (“prediction effect”) the “why” of the learning target/essential question (Beginning).

• Use a closure activity or ‘exit ticket’ that asks more than comprehension level, regurgitation questions. Ask students to both recall (retrieval practice) and apply what they learned to future or past learning (Ending).

• Purposeful reading, writing, and discussion - Reflection of some kind that addresses learning using evidence from the lesson that connects the learning to something else (Ending).


Formative Assessment in the Body of the Lesson (Practicing and Engagement)


• Connection activities that ask students to link new learning to older learning• Visualization activities where students draw some concept that has been learned

• Question design - ask kids to write their own questions with different levels of Bloom's involved

• Game play where appropriate can be a great tool as well• Blog writing as a reflective or questioning tool

• Mentor activities that ask the student to create something original using the learning as a model

• Problem solving activities where students apply skills to arrive at a solutionIf students can complete any or all of the above, then we know they have demonstrated proficiency on some level. As we seek to move kids to mastery, we need to be acutely aware of their progress.


Dorothy Retha Cook's curator insight, April 24, 6:20 AM

Lord God bless these words and their messengers allow it to be understood by man in the manner that is benefitual and for the good purpose of those that read it and bless them even the more that has is or will share it. Lord God have mercy reveal all those things that need be in Jesus name. Amen


 

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Why Suburban Schools Are Inflating Kids' Grades

Why Suburban Schools Are Inflating Kids' Grades | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Middle-class high-schoolers aren’t getting any smarter, but their GPAs are rising—and that’s pushing their poor peers further behind.

 


Here’s the latest, more profound way in which wealthier students have an advantage over lower-income ones: Those enrolled in private and suburban public high schools are being awarded higher grades—critical in the competition for college admission—than their urban public school counterparts with no less talent or potential, new research shows.


It’s not that those students have been getting smarter. Even as their grades were rising, their scores on the SAT college-entrance exam went down, not up. It’s that grade inflation is accelerating in the schools attended by higher-income Americans, who are also much more likely than their lower-income peers to be white, the research, by the College Board, found. This widens their lead in life over students in urban public schools, who are generally racial and ethnic minorities and from families that are far less well-off.


 

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Writing skills in demand, but few have them!

Writing skills in demand, but few have them! | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
He’s not alone in his opinion. According to national surveys, employers want to hire college graduates who can write coherently, think creatively and analyze quantitative data. But the Conference Board has found in its surveys of corporate hiring leaders that writing skill is one of the biggest gaps in workplace readiness.

That’s why so many employers now explicitly ask for writing and communications skills in their job advertisements. An analysis by Burning Glass Technologies, which studies job trends in real time by mining data from employment ads, found that writing and communications are the most requested job requirements across nearly every industry, even fields such as information technology and engineering.
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States continue to lower standards for teaching! CA joins the group.

States continue to lower standards for teaching! CA joins the group. | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Aspiring teachers in California will now be able to major in education as undergraduates, which an unusual state law there has technically forbidden for more than five decades.
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This is the No. 1 trait of great leaders, says Wharton's top professor

This is the No. 1 trait of great leaders, says Wharton's top professor | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The less you care about your own success, the more successful you will be.

That's according to Adam Grant, organizational psychologist, top-rated professor at Wharton business school and author of The New York Times best-selling books "Give and Take," "Originals" and "Option B."

"One of the things that stands out for me when I think about what distinguishes the greatest leaders of our time, is that success is very rarely a goal for them, it's a byproduct of other goals that they have," Grant, who has studied thousands of leaders in his career, tells CNBC Make It.

"They say, 'Look, the most meaningful way to succeed is to help other people succeed, to advance a vision or an idea or a project that is bigger than me, that's going to affect a lot of people,'" explains Grant.

"And then the bigger you aim there, the more you focus on doing something that's going to benefit others, the more likely you are to produce something that's also going to achieve success for you."
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libertopereda's curator insight, August 11, 3:50 PM
Community Concern. Focus in a vision that goes beyond "my" organization to impact the world positively. Key competence of #integralleadership #leadingforvitality
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Why Men Are the New Minority on College Campuses

Why Men Are the New Minority on College Campuses | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Males are enrolling in higher education at alarmingly low rates, and some colleges are working hard to reverse the trend.  

 


This fall, women will comprise more than 56 percent of students on campuses nationwide, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Some 2.2 million fewer men than women will be enrolled in college this year. And the trend shows no sign of abating. By 2026, the department estimates, 57 percent of college students will be women.

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The Brutal Truth About Why Being a Leader Is So Hard

Here's why leadership is so tough.
What makes this mentality so difficult is that, in every capacity, it asks that you, as a leader, put yourself last.

It's a removal of the ego. You can't just rage out of impatience, or get upset because other people aren't working the way you want them to work. You can't show your frustration--even if everyone else is. You can't sit back and complain when times get tough, you have to be the positive force that changes the tide.

You, as a leader, have to take a step back from your impulsive, emotional reactions, and instead operate from a place of calm understanding. And that's a skill that isn't taught in school, it's not taught in after-school clubs, or even on sports teams.

It's learned through watching closely others who embody that trait.

And it's learned through diligent self-inquiry, and constantly practicing the art of being flexible in the way you communicate and lead others.
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Students Say Schools Do Poor Job of Preparing Them for College

Students Say Schools Do Poor Job of Preparing Them for College | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Adults in education spend a lot of time debating about how to get high school students ready to succeed in college. But students have a less-than-rosy picture to report about how well that's going.

A new survey of 55,000 high school students across the country finds that only about half say their schools are doing a good job.



The study was conducted by YouthTruth, a San Francisco nonprofit that contracts with schools and districts interested in using the online surveys to kickstart dialogues focused on improvement.
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Fewer college students want to be teachers, and why it matters (searchable database)

Enrollment in teacher-prep programs is falling nationwide, and by more than 50 percent in Michigan colleges and universities. Why the classroom is losing its appeal.
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How To Respond When Students Say 'I Can’t Do This' -

How To Respond When Students Say 'I Can’t Do This' - | Leading Schools | Scoop.it

The use of “YET” was drawn from Carol Dweck’s work with growth mindsets.


‘Just the words “yet” or “not yet,” we’re finding give kids greater confidence, give them a path into the future that creates greater persistence. And we can actually change students’ mindsets. In one study, we taught them that every time they push out of their comfort zone to learn something new and difficult, the neurons in their brain can form new, stronger connections,and over time, they can get smarter.’ (Carol Dweck TED Talk: The power of believing that you can improve)


By asking learners to add ‘yet’ to the end of their ‘I can’t do this’ comments, possibilities are opened up for success in future attempts and iterations. It changes their fixed or failure mindsets to growth and possibility ones.

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Why Kids Can’t Write

Why Kids Can’t Write | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Some say English instruction must get back to basics, with a focus on grammar. But won’t that stifle a student’s personal voice?

 


Three-quarters of both 12th and 8th graders lack proficiency in writing, according to the most recent National Assessment of Educational Progress. And 40 percent of those who took the ACT writing exam in the high school class of 2016 lacked the reading and writing skills necessary to successfully complete a college-level English composition class, according to the company’s data.


Poor writing is nothing new, nor is concern about it. More than half of first-year students at Harvard failed an entrance exam in writing — in 1874. But the Common Core State Standards, now in use in more than two-thirds of the states, were supposed to change all this. By requiring students to learn three types of essay writing — argumentative, informational and narrative — the Core staked a claim for writing as central to the American curriculum. It represented a sea change after the era of No Child Left Behind, the 2002 federal law that largely overlooked writing in favor of reading comprehension assessed by standardized multiple-choice tests.

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US schools have undergone massive changes since the 1950s — here's what school was like the decade you were born

US schools have undergone massive changes since the 1950s — here's what school was like the decade you were born | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
American children and teens spend around 7.5 hours a week more at school than kids did 20 years ago.

That's only one way in which schools and education have changed over the years. Fashions come and go, but historical events and political changes impact education in many ways.

From speed-reading to SMART boards, here's what going to school looked like the decade you were born.  
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5 Growth Mindset Practices

5 Growth Mindset Practices | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
5 Growth Mindset Practices
In their groundbreaking book, Professional Learning Communities at Work, Richard DuFour and Robert Eaker say it clearly when pointing out the issue that comes about when change initiatives are considered "a task to complete rather than an ongoing process." If we really want to improve our schools, our work, and the education of our students, we can do so by adopting a new mindset -- for everyone -- that would include:

Being humble enough to accept that there are things about ourselves and our practices that can improve
Becoming part of professional teams that value constructive critique instead of criticism
Treating setbacks as formative struggles within the learning process instead of summative failures
Realizing the restrictive role that timelines can play in reaching high standards, and using foundational philosophies such as Universal Design for Learning (UDL) to map systems so that everyone's growth is supported
Create flexible grouping at all times so that nobody's trapped in any one course level or particular type of work.
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Digital Note Taking Strategies That Deepen Student Thinking

Digital Note Taking Strategies That Deepen Student Thinking | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Debates over note taking tend to focus on whether devices are helpful or harmful, rather than on strategies students can use to make connections between ideas
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Why Neuroscience Should Be Taught in Teacher-Preparation Programs

Why Neuroscience Should Be Taught in Teacher-Preparation Programs | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
How could neuroscience help teachers? Neuroscience can help teachers understand how the brain learns new information. Even having a basic knowledge of neuroscience can inform the way teachers teach.

For example, neuroscience tells us that when children learn new information, that information goes through pathways in the brain. These pathways connect neurons together. The more connections that exist between neurons, the easier it is for the brain to access information.

What does this mean for teachers? When students learn something new, they need to be able to connect it to something they already know. This forms strong neural pathways and makes recall easier.
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Goodbye to Grades? Mastery-Based Learning Is Becoming the New Standard

Goodbye to Grades? Mastery-Based Learning Is Becoming the New Standard | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
From New York to Vermont, and from Illinois to Idaho, a new kind of education standard is taking root. It's called mastery-based learning, and it means no grades. That's right; no A's, B's or C's. Instead, students focus on grade-appropriate skills competency. As in, being able to solve a certain type of math problem, or read at a certain level, or construct a thesis. Once they get it, they move on. Otherwise, they continue to focus on that particular set of skills.
According to The New York Times, in some regions, like New York City, elementary, middle and high schools are adopting this type of skills-based evaluation system voluntarily, while in others, states have mandated that these changes take place. And obviously, some parents and educators are all for abolishing grades, while others have met such a massive overhaul to education with much resistance.
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Who Gets Hurt When High School Diplomas Are Not Created Equal?

Who Gets Hurt When High School Diplomas Are Not Created Equal? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A new study finds that U.S. schools hand out 98 different kinds of high school diplomas, and 51 of them fail to prepare students adequately for college or careers. A disproportionate share of those weaker diplomas go to students of color and students from low-income families.

The uneven quality in high school credentials begs for attention in the national conversation about high school completion, even as the country boasts an all-time-high graduation rate of 83.2 percent, the report says.

"High school graduation rates are an important but incomplete indicator of success. In addition to measuring whether students receive a diploma, it also is critical to gauge the value of the diploma itself," says "Paper Thin," the study by the Alliance for Excellent Education. "Allowing students to walk across the stage at graduation with paper-thin diplomas—that do not signify readiness for postsecondary education—is a disservice both to students and to the economic potential of the United States."
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Good Leaders Are Good Learners

Good Leaders Are Good Learners | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Our research on leadership development shows that leaders who are in learning mode develop stronger leadership skills than their peers.

Building on Susan Ashford and Scott DeRue’s mindful engagement experiential learning cycle, we found that leaders who exhibit a growth mindset diligently work through each of the following three phases of the experiential learning cycle.

First, leaders set challenging learning goals in the form of “I need to learn how to…” For some leaders, the goal might be to become more persuasive or to be more approachable. With a goal in mind, leaders can identify opportunities to make progress toward it. These could include a new project, an international assignment, a job rotation, or simply striving to approach routine encounters in a fundamentally different way.
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How New Managers Can Send the Right Leadership Signals

How New Managers Can Send the Right Leadership Signals | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Set a leadership values-based goal. An authentic and connected presence begins from the inside-out. How you define the role and what you value will “telegraph” out to those you work with. As a new manager, spend time to consider the kind of leader you are and hope to be. Set an aspirational goal to serve as a guiding compass. As one new manager shared recently, “my professional leadership goal is to be a genuine and emotionally intelligent manager who inspires others to excellence.”
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Leading Effectively When You Inherit a Mess

Leading Effectively When You Inherit a Mess | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
A 10-year longitudinal study on executive transitions that my organization conducted found that more than 50% of executives who inherit a mess fail within their first 18 months on the job. We also uncovered numerous landmines for leaders in this situation. And, with the best of intentions, my client was about to step on a number of them. When a leader inherits a mess created by others, especially when arriving as an outsider, the situation can feel fragile and knowing where to begin the long journey of change can feel precarious. Based on our research and my experience, there are six things the most effective leaders do to avoid failing in a new role.
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Barry Deutsch's curator insight, August 7, 9:51 PM

This was a good article in HBR on why so many executives fail early in taking on a new job. Where to begin is sometimes the greatest challenge. Do any of these landmines sound familiar as you stepped into your most recent role? What do you do to minimize this risk of hiring failure when asking new CEOs/executives to "fix" a mess?

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A Surprising Way to Reduce Math Stress

A Surprising Way to Reduce Math Stress | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Eight in 10 teenagers identify school as a primary source of stress, and one in 10 say they’ve received lower grades because of stress. When it comes to math, the problem may be worse—many students experience math anxiety, low self-confidence, or overwhelming amounts of academic pressure, which can disrupt learning, leading to lower grades and test scores. Teachers try out a lot of ideas to reduce math stress, and here’s a surprising one: Have students write about their personal values. That’s the finding from a new study published in PLOS One.
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What is Close Reading? | Shanahan on Literacy

Close reading requires a substantial emphasis on readers figuring out a high-quality text. This "figuring out" is accomplished primarily by reading and discussing the text (as opposed to being told about the text by a teacher or being informed about it through some textbook commentary). Because challenging texts do not give up their meanings easily, it is essential that readers re-read such texts (not all texts are worth close reading). A first reading is about figuring out what a text says. It is purely an issue of reading comprehension. Thus, if someone is reading a story, he/should be able to retell the plot; if someone is reading a science chapter, he/she should be able to answer questions about the key ideas and details of the text.
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Why mastery beats creativity—every time

Why mastery beats creativity—every time | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
Any effective creativity training program should focus on both aspects of the creative process: “convergent” thinking (the generative, brainstorming phase in which tasks are carried out without judgement or hesitation), and “divergent” thinking (that part where you hone and assess the wealth of ideas that you’ve already generated). The convergent stage is the time when ideas are freely generated without rejection, no matter how bad they may seem. And this is all many creative studies minors focus on—that sexy, sky’s-the-limit phase when everyone is tossing ideas around, the wilder the better.
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Dr. Deborah Brennan's comment, August 7, 6:42 AM
The definition of divergent and convergent are switched. Divergent is the brainstorming and convergent is when you weigh the options to select one idea.
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How do you get the right amount of testing?

How do you get the right amount of testing? | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
As the testing in K-12 has become more emphasized, educators are still working out how to get the right amount of testing that doesn't sacrifice valuable teaching time.
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We're All Born With Mathematical Abilities (And Why That's Important)

We're All Born With Mathematical Abilities (And Why That's Important) | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
The roots of those abilities and those skills seem to come from an endowment that is evolutionarily ancient and that we share with most other species.

In other words, we've evolved to know math — along with almost every other animal. How did you become interested in this?

I've always been fascinated with the idea that you can have this sophisticated knowledge — at least the foundations of it — in place, very early on. And we know now that it's very broadly available across animal species. Species as different from humans as fish: Guppies are sensitive to numbers in the environment. Of course, primates are. Salamanders. Various insects. It's this basic ability that helps animals navigate their environment. I mean, literally, navigate the environment by calculating angles and distances and so forth. It helps them choose the greater amount of food if they're choosing between two quantities. It shows up in foraging contexts all the time.
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9 Killer Resources For Online Self-Education

9 Killer Resources For Online Self-Education | Leading Schools | Scoop.it
We are so fortunate to have a wealth of information at our finger tips. There are so many online resources we can use to educate ourselves. Sometimes it does become overwhelming with all the options, but we should never feel overwhelmed by information. Depending on what you want to educate yourself on, you should find a ton of online resources on the subject. Traditional learning has taken a back step for individuals who want to take control of their time and what information they find beneficial to their lives.

So many people have decided to give up their 9-5 jobs in the hopes of making money from their passions. A lot of successful people have emerged and you can find teenagers starting and succeeding at business, without much of a formal qualification. If you are someone who want to self-educate yourself, we have the best resources to use as a start.
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