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Making the big cheese

Making the big cheese | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

In troubled times, leadership is key, and can make the difference between profit and bankruptcy. So what makes a successful CEO? 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Skip all the "How to..." and "Do this..." articles and read this one instead. A phenomenal article with references to the work of Kevin Dutton and Manfred Kets de Vries.

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About LeadershipABC

About LeadershipABC | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The purpose of this site - LeadershipABC - is to help leaders rethink, redefine, and reshape their organizations and themselves to meet the challenges of the future.


I collect stories on leadership/management, that I find useful, educational, and inspirational to others. 

 

It is no longer a futuristic vision to talk about a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous business environment. It is the reality that most leaders face every day. 

The way we work is fundamentally under pressure and it is evident that leaders must develop new responses and capabilities to navigate in the world and stay relevant. 

                                                 ★★★★★


I believe that knowledge is everything. Knowledge is ideas. Knowledge is power. Knowledge is hope. 

But only if it is shared and applied.


That is why I created LeadershipABC on Scoop.it. My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 

I'm co-founder of Future Associates, a consultancy that helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, and organizational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.


You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen

Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

I hope you'll be inspired.

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth

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The Biggest Contract

The Biggest Contract | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The great, long-running debate about business' role in society is currently caught between two contrasting, and tired, ideological purposes: create shareholder value or embrace corporate social responsibility. 


In this column, Ian Davis takes a critical look at both viewpoints and suggest a different way to move forward. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Large companies need to build social issues into strategy in a way which reflects their actual business importance. They need to articulate business's social contribution and define its ultimate purpose in a way that has more subtlety than “the business of business is business” worldview and is less defensive than most current CSR approaches. It can help to view the relationship between big business and society in this respect as an implicit “social contract.”



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David Foster Wallace on Leadership

David Foster Wallace on Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

“A leader’s real ‘authority’ is a power you voluntarily give him, and you grant him this authority not with resentment or resignation but happily.”


In a culture that calls pop culture celebrities “thought-leaders” and looks for “leadership ability” in kindergartners, we’re left wondering what leadership actually means and questioning what makes a great leader.


The best definition of the essence beneath the leadership buzzword comes from David Foster Wallace. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This is a beautifully curated story by Maria Popova on Brain Pickings.


Also discover Debbie Millman's felt-on-felt typographic art piece and reading that captures the wisdom from Wallace’s essay “Up, Simba: Seven Days on the Trail of an Anticandidate."


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The Art of Self-Renewal: A Timeless 1964 Field Guide to Keeping Your Company and Your Soul Vibrantly Alive

The Art of Self-Renewal: A Timeless 1964 Field Guide to Keeping Your Company and Your Soul Vibrantly Alive | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Self-Renewal: The Individual and the Innovative Society is a forgotten book of extraordinary prescience and warm wisdom, which rings even timelier today. It’s a must-read as much for entrepreneurs and leaders seeking to infuse their organizations with ongoing vitality as it is for all of us as individuals, on our private trajectories of self-transcendence and personal growth.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

John W. Gardner's book is a gem!!! 


I also recommend that you read a speech given by John W. Gardner that I Scooped earlier: Personal renewal.  

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, October 23, 8:22 AM

This is one book everyone needs to read not tomorrow - Today! 

David Hain's curator insight, October 23, 10:08 AM

"The renewal of societies and organizations can go forward only if someone cares. Apathy and lowered motivation are the most widely noted characteristics of a civilization on the downward path." ~ John W. Gardner

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Military Adaptive Leadership: Overcome or Overcompensate?

Military Adaptive Leadership: Overcome or Overcompensate? | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The dynamic nature of the 21st century security environment requires adaptations. 


The most important adaptations will be in how we develop the next generation of leaders, who must be prepared to learn and change faster than their future adversaries.  


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Army Major John McRae argues that the military must take a balanced approach to the concept of "adaptive leadership," understanding there is still a need for more traditional and technical leadership forms. Applying the right form at the right time is crucial in war and in peace.


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John Michel's curator insight, October 16, 11:57 AM

One significant danger associated with the military’s embrace of adaptive leadership is the risk of utilizing adaptive leadership in instances where technical leadership is the more effective approach. 

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Management Intuition For the Next 50 Years

Management Intuition For the Next 50 Years | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

We stand today on the precipice of much bigger shifts in each of these areas, with extraordinary implications for global leaders. In the years ahead, acceleration in the scope, scale, and economic impact of technology will usher in a new age of artificial intelligence, consumer gadgetry, instant communication, and boundless information while shaking up business in unimaginable ways.

 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The collision of technological disruption, rapid emerging-markets growth, and widespread aging is upending long-held assumptions that underpin strategy setting, decision making, and management.

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Beware the Angry Birds

Beware the Angry Birds | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The digital revolution has dramatically shifted the balance of power from companies to their critics. Although big firms deploy armies of PR flacks, anyone with a smartphone and a socialmedia account now has the same power to reach a global audience.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Companies have failed to adapt. The biggest of businesses with the slickest of publicity operations, from McDonald’s to JPMorgan Chase, British Gas to Qantas, have found that when they tried engaging with tweeters on their home turf, they were drowned in a sea of sarcasm.


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Steve Bax's curator insight, October 10, 5:36 AM

Very good scoop by Kenneth Mikkelsen here. Some interesting comment in the article by Eric Dezenhall, an American crisis-management consultant, who has lots of practical advice. He tells CEOs to restrict the view into their glass houses: avoid the “reply all” function on their e-mail; think twice before sending any strongly worded message. He warns against one-size-fits-all approaches to crises: the common prescription to come clean quickly and fully sometimes stokes the fire. 

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Tom Peters on leading the 21st-century organization

Tom Peters on leading the 21st-century organization | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Thirty years after leaving McKinsey, the prolific author returns to discuss tomorrow’s management challenges and the keys to organizational change and transformative leadership in any age. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Wise take-aways from Tom Peters:


  • Do you know what the biggest problem is with big-company CEOs? They don’t read enough.” We’ve always had to keep up. But now we need to be students in a way that maybe we haven’t been before.
  • 50 percent of your time should be unscheduled. The secret to success is daydreaming.
  • One way to deal with the insane pace of change is by living to get smarter and to learn new things. Another way is by going up the value-added chain beyond the kinds of tasks and roles that can be automated.
  • “Design mindfulness” has got to be in everything you do—down to the littlest thing. Even the language you use in your e-mails. There’s a character to communications. There’s a character to business. It’s how you live in the world
  • If you’re a leader, your whole reason for living is to help human beings develop —to really develop people and make work a place that’s energetic and exciting and a growth opportunity, whether you’re running a Housekeeping Department or Google.
  • People say that fame is important, but in the end it really isn’t. People say that wealth is important, but in the end it really isn’t. My ex-wife had a father who was in the tombstone business. I’ve seen a lot of tombstones. None of ’em have net worth on ’em. It’s the people you develop.
  • Change is about recruiting allies and working each other up to have the nerve to try the next experiment.
  • Leadership is about organizing the affairs of our fellow human beings to provide some sort of a service to other people.


I also encourage you to follow Tom on Twitter here: @tom_peters.
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, October 6, 11:54 AM

School managers,. politicians, and School bureaucrats along with teachers should read Peters. We would be more humble and less expert in are efforts.

 

@ivon_ehd1

 

Tony Vengrove's curator insight, October 6, 1:48 PM

Not much to add after Kenneth brilliantly shared his own takeaways. Having said that, I believe much of what's discussed here is highly relevant for leading innovation. 

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The Changing Tools of Leadership

The Changing Tools of Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Spending on corporate learning is soaring, and the number one area is management and leadership development. However, the tools are changing, with peer-to-peer learning and coaching rapidly overtaking traditional methods. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The resurgence of coaching, as covered in the July issue of HR magazine, suggests it could be. The Henley study found 83% of organisations intend to make use of coaching, with external coaches preferred for executive and senior management posts and internal coaches more likely for high-potential employees. 


This means a much greater focus on what the organisation values culturally and where certain approaches could work in response to particular situations. 


The biggest challenge in leadership development is around getting individuals to change their behaviour, to help them cope with the rigours of leading more modern, open and democratic organisations. 

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Jan Futtrup Kjaer's comment, October 6, 3:23 PM
Testing
Jan Futtrup Kjaer's curator insight, October 6, 3:26 PM

Testing comments

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The Most Important Skill for Great Leaders? Trustworthiness.

The Most Important Skill for Great Leaders? Trustworthiness. | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

What makes a great leader? You are probably thinking it’s something buzzword-worthy like confidence.  Or maybe vision.  Or emotional intelligence—you hear about that one all the time.  For sure, those are all good qualities for a leader to have, but the answer is actually trustworthiness. Technically, it’s not just being trustworthy that is key, but being seen as trustworthy.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

It doesn’t matter how competent you are as a leader, you won’t get very far if your team doesn’t trust you.

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Don Cloud's curator insight, October 1, 2:41 PM

Trust can only be given.  Are you the kind of leader in whom your people choose to put their trust?

Pierre Galeon's curator insight, October 5, 11:13 AM

Without trust there is nothing. 

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The Career Advice You Probably Didn’t Get

The Career Advice You Probably Didn’t Get | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

You’re doing everything right at work, taking all the right advice, but you’re just not moving up. Why? Susan Colantuono shares a simple, surprising piece of advice you might not have heard before quite so plainly. This talk, while aimed at an audience of women, has universal takeaways -- for men and women, new grads and midcareer workers.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Stuck in middle management? Here's what you need to know if you want a top leadership position. 


You can follow Susan Colantuono on Twitter here: @LeadingWomen.

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Dealing With the Shadow Side of Leadership

Dealing With the Shadow Side of Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Senior executives need exceptional drive and interpersonal skills to push themselves and others to succeed – but under pressure, these qualities can go into overdrive, and lead to catastrophe. So what makes managers act out the darker side of their leadership? How can professionals identify and challenge self-defeating behaviours to ensure that leadership shadows or ‘gremlins’ are disciplined? 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Other resources on this topic: 


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Joe Boutte's curator insight, September 29, 5:53 AM

Finding balance and establishing a foundation of integrity keeps leaders from crossing into the dark side.

David Hain's curator insight, October 6, 3:03 AM

Many 'weaknesses'  are strengths, overdone. We need feedback to calibrate how to be at our best without teetering over.

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Don't Be a "Water Bucket" Leader

Don't Be a "Water Bucket" Leader | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

A “water bucket” leader is someone whose leadership approach can be likened to sticking a hand into a bucket of water and creating a stir by splashing it around. Eventually, the leader pulls their hand out, and when they do, the water quickly returns to it’s original state. It’s as if they never existed. Even though there was a lot of activity, in the end, the bucket of water looks no different than it did before. 



Via george_reed, Ivon Prefontaine, Dean J. Fusto, John Michel
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

In this blog post Joe Byerly refers to four factors that characterize transformational leadership:


  1. Idealized Influence- Is the emotional component of leadership. Idealized influence describes leaders who act as strong role models for followers; followers identify with these leaders and want to emulate them. These leaders usually have very high standards of moral and ethical conduct and can be counted on to do the right thing. They provide vision, a sense of mission, and instill pride in the organization and the individual.
  2. Inspirational motivation- This factor is descriptive of leaders who communicate high expectations to followers, inspiring them through motivation to become committed to and a part of the shared vision of the organization.
  3. Intellectual stimulation- It includes leadership that stimulates followers to be creative and innovative, challenging their own beliefs and values as well as those of the leader and the organization.
  4. Individualized consideration- This factor is representative of leaders who provide a supportive climate in which they listen carefully to the individual needs of their followers and assists them in developing their own potential. These are leaders who sit down and take the time to develop their subordinates through counseling and coaching.


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donhornsby's curator insight, September 28, 11:30 AM

(From the article): I like these factors because they emphasize behaviors, not traits. We can all incorporate idealized influence, inspirational motivation, intellectual stimulation, and individualized consideration into our commands if we take deliberate steps to do so.  We can all be like my former Sergeant Major or my first Commander if we ask ourselves the following:


What can I do to provide a vision, a sense of mission, and instill pride in my organization?


What can I do to inspire and motivate my organization?


What can I do to foster a command climate that stimulates intellectual growth in my organization?


What can I do to help my subordinates develop to their full potential?


We do not have to walk away from our commands feeling like we just pulled our hands out of a bucket of water. We can make a difference and leave a legacy that will endure long after we are removed from the equation.  Approaching leadership with the goal of being transformational, not only makes the experience more rewarding, it also ensures that the woodpile is a little bit higher on the back end.

Cammie Dunaway's curator insight, September 29, 4:51 PM

A “water bucket” leader is someone whose leadership approach can be likened to sticking a hand into a bucket of water and creating a stir by splashing it around. Eventually, the leader pulls their hand out, and when they do, the water quickly returns to it’s original state. It’s as if they never existed. Even though there was a lot of activity, in the end, the bucket of water looks no different than it did before

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Finding a Corporate Culture that Drives Growth

Finding a Corporate Culture that Drives Growth | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Corporate leaders and academics have been debating the connection between institutional culture and growth for more than three decades. Yet most can’t really put their finger on the single aspect of an organization’s culture that’s most effective at driving financial performance.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

In recent research published in the August 2014 Journal of Organizational Behavior, Stanford professor Charles A. O’Reilly teamed with colleagues Jennifer A. Chatman and Bernadette Doerr at the University of California–Berkeley and David F. Caldwell at Santa Clara University.  


The research concluded that “adaptive” corporate cultures are more effective at driving financial performance.


Adaptive cultures encourage:

  • Risk-taking
  • A willingness to experiment
  • Innovation
  • Personal initiative
  • Fast decision-making and execution
  • Ability to spot unique opportunities


Adaptive cultures are also notable for the behaviors they choose to minimize. There’s less emphasis on being careful, predictable, avoiding conflict, and making your numbers.


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Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, October 30, 11:18 AM

Research has found that corporate cultures that emphasize adaptability generally produce “revenue growth, market and book value, ‘most admired’ ratings, employee satisfaction, and stock analysts’ recommendations.”

Christian Bartosik's curator insight, October 31, 12:03 PM

The research concluded that “adaptive” corporate cultures are more effective at driving financial performance.


Adaptive cultures encourage:

Risk-takingA willingness to experimentInnovationPersonal initiativeFast decision-making and executionAbility to spot unique opportunities
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Is leadership ready for the social age?

Is leadership ready for the social age? | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The social age is a revolution; one that affects all parts of the business model. The way an organization creates, delivers and captures value. The way a business talks with employees, customers, communities, even regulators and government. And certainly the way leaders lead and behave.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

We face a big challenge. But it certainly is not Facebook, Twitter or the latest social media platform. The biggest challenge the world has seen since the Industrial Age is not social media. It is transparency.


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David Hain's curator insight, October 28, 5:20 AM

"The business world needs: Less jargon, more sincerity, less propaganda, more value, less process, more humanity." ` @PeterAceto

donhornsby's curator insight, October 28, 8:42 AM

(From the article) So we face a big challenge. But it certainly is not Facebook, Twitter or the latest social media platform. The biggest challenge the world has seen since the Industrial Age is not social media. It is transparency.

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The Wisdom of Peter Drucker from A to Z

The Wisdom of Peter Drucker from A to Z | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Known widely as the father of management, Peter Drucker formulated many concepts about business that we now take for granted. Here is an overview of Drucker's contributions, from A to Z.


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James Schreier's curator insight, October 27, 9:16 AM

What wisdom -- at the time -- and now timeless!

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What Peter Drucker Knew About 2020

What Peter Drucker Knew About 2020 | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Leaders and organizations cannot win in today’s business world with yesterday’s tools and strategies. The mindsets, attitudes, processes and leadership competencies that have served us well in the past, are not likely to secure success today, or in the near future.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

In this HBR blog post leading up to the Global Peter Drucker Forum in Vienna, Rick Wartzman takes a closer look at six management imperatives for the knowledge age. Inspired by the great Peter F. Drucker. 

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David Hain's curator insight, October 17, 2:55 AM

Via @Kenneth Mikkelsen, well worth following the Global Peter Drucker Forum in Vienna.

Tony Park's curator insight, October 17, 5:33 AM

Ours is “the first society in which ‘honest work’ does not mean a callused hand,” Drucker noted

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Business Transformation Journal

We are at the beginning of a new era in which traditional industries are transforming the ways they act and operate significantly. Many firms are starting to move towards a customer-centric organization, to think about new business models or to think about the digitalization of the economy and what this could mean for their business.


Even though the need to change is obvious and the willingness to succeed is evident, many transformations still fail. Looking at emerging technologies such as the digitalization, we can even draw a more pessimistic picture. Nearly 70% of all companies do not have a clear strategy on how to integrate digitalization with the elements of their business.


For the future, we need to think of transformation in a systematic and a highly integrated way. Consistency in strategy and design will be as important as specific and complementary leadership styles and governance.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

An interesting publication - 360° Business Transformation Journal - by SAP and The University of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland.


The magazine contains two particularly interesting articles about business model innovation (page 6-15) and business transformation management (page 16-27).

Key Learnings (Business Model Innovation): 

  1. It is not enough to rely on product innovation. Often products fail, if they address the market with the wrong business model.
  2. Business models can be systematically developed and evaluated based on an agile and iterative process that ensures economic viability.
  3. Business models are probably the most powerful driver of competitive advantage and should be managed as it is done with product portfolios.
  4. Business cases by themselves are insufficient if they do not build on a validated business model.
  5. Business model development and innovation combined with Design Thinking and lean offers a meaningful and solid foundation for businesses.

Key Learnings (Business Transformation Management):

  1. New technologies and market demands initiate tremendous need for transformation in organizational and process dimensions and question existing structures of power in companies. Existing management practices and the management itself will be the objective of transformation.
  2. In order to master transformation, integrated approaches are needed to focus simultaneously on the strategy and new design of a future organization when initiating and orchestrating the change.
  3. In order to achieve the desired results by changing patterns of an organization, consistency in strategic and structural dimension is the major design principle.
  4. A comprehensive approach to leadership style to fit with the objectives and situations in transformations is needed.
  5. Charismatic and instrumental leadership styles have to be used at the same time and management behavior has to switch between collaborative and coercive depending on the specific situation, as these styles and behavior are in fact complementary. Leaders thus have to go beyond personal value preferences when selecting an organizational change strategy and reject the idea of a universally applicable leadership style in transformations.
  6. A comprehensive governance structure is needed to insure for information flow and feedback within the structures and roles and finally steer the overall transformation.
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Business Transformation: People. Process. Results.

Business transformation has taken hold across the broad corporate landscape, and there is a correlation between a formal process and transformation itself. Companies that have a formal process are more vigilant about assessing their business and operating models against their business strategy and are more active in transformation. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

For this study, Forbes Insights, in association with KPMG, surveyed 910 executives at U.S.-based multinationals and banking or asset management firms. Out of 709 corporations, 90% of executives came from companies with revenues over $1 billion. Out of 201 banking or asset management firms, all had assets under management of at least $5 billion. 

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David Hain's curator insight, October 15, 2:42 AM

Business as usual just doesn't cut it any more...

Steve Bax's curator insight, October 15, 5:26 AM

Another very good scoop from Kenneth Mikkelsen here. Key 'take aways' for me are the reinforcement of some of the core principles of effective change within organisations. The research identifies the importance of elements such as: alignment of corporate culture, structure and early integration of metrics to the process. Although the shift is clearly to emergent rather than planned 'seismic' Kurt Lewin type change, the need for John Kotter's eight steps can still be seen in the issues from this recent study. There are some valuable findings on culture, decentralised companies and the need for collaboration across functions here too. 

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Espousing Equality, but Embracing a Hierarchy

Espousing Equality, but Embracing a Hierarchy | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Many companies aspire to a flat organizational structure, but a new paper finds that management serves a purpose that workers welcome: providing order in a chaotic world.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

recently published paper in The Journal of Personality and Social Psychology suggests that hierarchies are a form of structure that we embrace for comfort in a chaotic world.


The paper, by Justin Friesen of York University, Aaron C. Kay of the Fuqua School of Business at Duke, Richard Eibach of the University of Waterloo and Adam Galinsky of the Columbia Business School, builds on the notion of compensatory control: When we feel a lack of personal control, we compensate by looking for order or predictability in our environment.

Photo credit: Michael Waraksa

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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, October 8, 7:06 AM

As I'm always saying: BALANCE!!! ...:-)))

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Reinventing Organizations

A talk, followed by Q&A, by Frederic Laloux about "Reinventing Organizations", a research and book that is turning into an international phenomenon. 


Increasingly, employees and managers (but also doctors, nurses, teachers, etc.) are disillusioned with the way we run organizations today. We all somehow sense that there simply must be better ways to run our businesses, nonprofits, schools and hospitals. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This hopeful talk shares the key insights from groundbreaking research into the emergence, in different parts of the world, of truly powerful and soulful organizations that have made a radical leap beyond today's management thinking.


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David Hain's curator insight, October 5, 4:32 AM

Great book, great talk.  The future is here already, but it means a mindset change for most!

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Behaviour, not technology, must be primary driver of change

Behaviour, not technology, must be primary driver of change | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

HR directors and their CEOs are increasingly coming to terms with the fact that as many as one in four of the people they employ are either consciously or unconsciously undermining their organisations. Such is the power of disengagement at work.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

An increasing number of today’s leaders are turning to technology. Social media-style tools are being deployed to deliver online ‘crowdsourcing’ conversations to include employees in the process of strategic planning and problem solving. This move away from command and control management styles is something to be welcomed and celebrated. These tools have incredible potential. 


Unfortunately, few are managing to deliver on the promise of this leadership approach. Too many leaders still think that if you buy the right piece of technology and give it to your comms and HR people, staff will automatically start using it and become more engaged as a consequence.  


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We Need Better Managers, Not More Technocrats

We Need Better Managers, Not More Technocrats | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Digital technology is the biggest agitator of the business world today. Mobile technology, social media, cloud computing, embedded devices, big data, and analytics have radically changed the nature of work and competition.  And digital innovations will continue to do so for the foreseeable future. Technology has tremendous potential to be the engine of increasing human, organizational, and economic prosperity.


However, digital technology is not the true story. Digital transformation is.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Building digital organizations is ultimately about leadership. 


This post is part of a series leading up to the annual Global Drucker Forum, taking place November 13-14 2014 in Vienna, Austria.


In October 2014 the people behind this blog post will publish a new book along with Andrew McAfee: Leading Digital: Turning Technology into Business Transformation

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The Six Types of CEO

The Six Types of CEO | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The single biggest problem for HRDs is their inability to influence and shift their CEO towards the right HR agenda for the company. Despite the image most HRDs portray, with a few notable exceptions, they do not tend to have a major impact on the CEO and broader business agenda beyond the mechanics of HR. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Each CEO type has a different set of motivations, strengths and challenges. Sometimes a CEO can have two or three different CEO types, but they normally have only one. These types are: the commercial executor, the financial value driver, the corporate entrepreneur, the corporate ambassador, the global missionary and the people champion.

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Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, September 30, 8:49 AM

HRDs often talk a big game when in reality they don’t have the impact and influence they’d like. There are several reasons for this, such as not being commercially savvy enough, but the most important is the inability to have more courageous conversations.

Ian Berry's curator insight, September 30, 6:23 PM

If you're not a people champion in today's world you are sabotaging your role as a CEO whatever "type" you may be drawn to

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New model leaders: How leadership is changing

New model leaders: How leadership is changing | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Are the days of 'rock star' CEOs over? Do we need collaborative networks over rigid hierarchies? Read on to find out how leadership models are changing and explore HR's role in getting them right. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Evidence suggests organisations’ leadership strategies are failing to keep up with a fast-changing world. To bridge this gulf, the notion of what a leader looks like needs to change.


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Has Capitalism Reached A Turning Point?

Has Capitalism Reached A Turning Point? | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

People have fears and anxieties similar to those felt in the aftermath of the Renaissance where medieval thinking created myths of falling of the edge of the earth. Enlightenment did not come cheap then, as it does not come cheap now. However it is what we make of these facts and how to utilize these, that differs. We are living in times that offer us great opportunities for reinvention. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Pro-business thought leaders are calling for a Reformation of capitalism: will they be able to agree on a common cause at the Drucker Forum in November 2014?


Steve Denning is one of my favorite writers. I encourage you to follow his blog on Forbes here. Steve is also on Twitter here: @stevedenning


In this blog post Steve also made a great curation of articles related to the current shift away from "the world's dumbest idea" of maximizing shareholder value. 



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