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Leaders in search of followership

Leaders in search of followership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

In a conversation with Barbara Kellerman journalist Kenneth Mikkelsen explores why leadership is so hard to exercise today. This is a must read for everyone interested in leadership and management trends. 

 
The interview with Barbara Kellerman relates to her latest book: "The End of Leadership."

 

Barbara raises the important questions: Why are our leaders so widely disdained—and why is our trust in leaders of every stripe at a leaden low? Why do incompetence and intemperance continue rampant? Why are ethics so elusive? Why is teaching leading full of “flaws”? Why has it proved so hard to build a body of knowledge? Why has the leadership industry, for all its apparent successes, failed on so many levels? 

 

Barbara has strong opinions about the leadership industry. She doesn't believe that becomming a leader is a quick fix that can be learned from a seven-step guide written by former CEOs or short and expensive leadership courses.

 

For futher information:

 

Visit Barbara Kellerman’s personal blog: http://barbarakellerman.com.

 

Barbara Kellerman discusses some of the core topics of her book in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIo5_eJs5-Y.

 

Get inspirered from this video about followership: Leadership from a dancing guy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hO8MwBZl-Vc

 

Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen on http://www.scoop.it/t/leadershipabc

 

 

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Fernando Mazzuli's curator insight, August 23, 2013 9:00 AM

Real leadership development - something that takes time and reflection, involves personal values, context and effective practices.

rob halkes's curator insight, July 22, 9:14 AM

Leadership : as much a factor in good health as medical knowledge..


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About LeadershipABC

About LeadershipABC | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The purpose of this site - LeadershipABC - is to help leaders rethink, redefine, and reshape their organizations and themselves to meet the challenges of the future.


I collect stories on leadership/management, that I find useful, educational, and inspirational to others. 

 

It is no longer a futuristic vision to talk about a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous business environment. It is the reality that most leaders face every day. 

The way we work is fundamentally under pressure and it is evident that leaders must develop new responses and capabilities to navigate in the world and stay relevant. 

                                                 ★★★★★


I believe that knowledge is everything. Knowledge is ideas. Knowledge is power. Knowledge is hope. 

But only if it is shared and applied.


That is why I created LeadershipABC on Scoop.it. My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 

I'm co-founder of Future Associates, a consultancy that helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, and organizational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.


You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen

Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

I hope you'll be inspired.

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth

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Lego Boss Reads 'The Opposable Mind'

Jorgen Vig Knudstorp reveals how author Roger Martin has influenced his leadership philosophy. He refers to Roger's excellent book: The Opposable Mind

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The Business Case for Inclusive Leadership

The Business Case for Inclusive Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Inclusive leaders get the best out of all their people, helping their organisations to succeed in today’s complex, diverse national and global environment.  Through their skills in adaptability, building relationships and developing talent, inclusive leaders are able to increase performance and innovation.


Inclusive leadership is leadership excellence. The way we do business is changing. Customers and employees are becoming more diverse. The development of the knowledge economy means flatter, less hierarchical structures in organisations. Increased agility is the necessary response to emerging markets, economic downturn and the cultural change inspired by social media and new ways of communicating.



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Leaders need to be adaptable to manage agile workplaces of the future, and create cultures that leverage diversity for competitive advantage, to the benefit of business and stakeholders alike.It means that trust is essential to employee engagement and organisational performance.


Watch also this related video on inclusive leadership. 


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Prof. Hankell's curator insight, December 7, 11:51 PM

People are the most important resource a business has and managers are vital in getting the best out of employees...

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Making Capabilities Explicit is The Work of Leadership

Making Capabilities Explicit is The Work of Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The clearest route to aligning and communicating strategy is through capabilities. That makes articulating and assessing capabilities a crucial new role for leaders. 


Via Roger Francis
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Making capabilities explicit is the work of leadership. But it is not theirs alone. 

As business models change and workforce demographics shift to younger workers, leaders not only need to define strategic intent, it is essential that they mobilise the organisation’s talent through capability development.

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donhornsby's curator insight, December 1, 10:01 AM

(From the article): Leader’s Role in Shaping Capabilities

The process of identifying capabilities is not a solitary exercise. Making them explicit, however, is the role of the leader. Most leaders, along with their senior teams, apply themselves diligently to the process of designing strategy, communication, organisation mission and vision. Some leaders may also excel at communicating strategic intent to down and across the organisation.

María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, December 1, 1:19 PM

Las Capacidades del Líder ... Hacer Capacidades explícita es la obra de Liderazgo |scoopit travésLeadershipABC http: //sco.lt / ...

Steve Bax's curator insight, December 2, 4:56 AM

Fascinating article scooped by Roger Francis on the critical link between capabilities and effective strategy implementation. Clear reference points to emergent strategy and competitive advantage but some very good thinking too. This is a 'must read' for strategic marketers given the importance of matching organisational capability with market needs and wants.

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Greatness is a choice

Greatness is a choice | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

During the presidential election of 1864, when Abraham Lincoln ran against General George McClellan, he adopted a famous campaign slogan: "Don’t swap horses in midstream." The euphemism was an appeal to reelect Lincoln for his second term. But the underlying message was also to avoid flip-flopping politics no matter if it was challenging times.


The campaign slogan comes to mind when you read Great By ChoiceThe book is the result of a productive partnership between Jim Collins and Morten Hansen - two of the most influential management thinkers today. Jim Collins is a household name on bestseller lists worldwide. He has authored or coauthored six books that have sold in total more than ten million copies. Morten Hansen is the author of the critically acclaimed book Collaboration and a management professor at the University of California, Berkeley and Apple University.


The major theme of Great By Choice is that the ability of any company to not merely survive, but to thrive in the face of harsh business conditions, depends on the quality of decisions its leadership makes. Uncertainty, chaos and luck are constraints, and great leaders understand that these forces cannot be controlled, only managed to. And to achieve sustained success companies and leaders should avoid constant flip-flopping as a reaction to a radically changing world. In other words avoid swapping horses in midstream.

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Leaders in Search of Followership

Leaders in Search of Followership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

When Americans rallied to support Barack Obama during the 2008 presidential campaign, it reflected widespread wishful thinking - that here was a hero for our own times, a Great Man who had overcome difficult odds to create change and cure what ails the American society. A human incarnation of “the audacity of hope.” But according to Barbara Kellerman reality has caught up with Obama and his followers.

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Are You a Leader in a Bubble?

Are You a Leader in a Bubble? | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Executives are essentially operating in a “protective bubble” because the people around them feel that it is their job to protect both the executive and themselves. But in essence, that very ‘inner-circle’ achieves the exact opposite. It puts leaders at greater risk because they don’t get the information they need fast enough to make the right decisions and when they do, it’s been filtered and sanitized. It puts the entire organization at risk as critical decisions get delayed as information slowly reaches the decision maker.


Image credit: HikingArtist, Fritz Ahlefeldt. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Too many leaders are getting filtered information from their staff who ‘protect’ them, and that hampers their ability to be effective.


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Understanding Servant Leadership

Understanding Servant Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The 21st century has brought much in the way of turmoil and change to the world of business. As a consequence, ways of doing business that were once universally accepted now seem outdated and inflexible in an age where knowledge drives economies and socially responsible corporate attitudes influence stakeholders and shareholders alike.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Companies adopting servant leadership within their organisational culture give a lot of attention to developing environments and support structures that foster high levels of employee satisfaction. In addition, the servant leader works toward building a learning organisation where individuals are encouraged to grow and be of unique value.


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Bureaucracy Must Die

Bureaucracy Must Die | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Most of us grew up in and around organizations that fit a common template. Strategy gets set at the top. Power trickles down. Big leaders appoint little leaders. Individuals compete for promotion. Compensation correlates with rank. Tasks are assigned. Managers assess performance. Rules tightly circumscribe discretion. This is the recipe for “bureaucracy,” the 150-year old mashup of military command structures and industrial engineering that constitutes the operating system for virtually every large-scale organization on the planet.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

When the responsibility for setting strategy and direction is concentrated at the top of an organization, a few senior leaders become the gatekeepers of change. If they are unwilling to adapt and learn, the entire organization stalls. When a company misses the future, the fault invariably lies with a small cadre of seasoned executives who failed to write off their depreciating intellectual capital.

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Edward Pierce's curator insight, November 12, 9:50 AM

when looking at how technology has impacted modern business, we MUST think differently on how we structure organizations

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The Leaders Who Ruined Africa, and the Generation Who Can Fix It

The Leaders Who Ruined Africa, and the Generation Who Can Fix It | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Before he hit eighteen, Fred Swaniker had lived in Ghana, Gambia, Botswana and Zimbabwe. What he learned from a childhood across Africa was that while good leaders can't make much of a difference in societies with strong institutions, in countries with weak structures, leaders could make or break a country. In a passionate talk the entrepreneur and TED Fellow looks at different generations of African leaders and imagines how to develop the leadership of the future.

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The Biggest Contract

The Biggest Contract | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The great, long-running debate about business' role in society is currently caught between two contrasting, and tired, ideological purposes: create shareholder value or embrace corporate social responsibility. 


In this column, Ian Davis takes a critical look at both viewpoints and suggest a different way to move forward. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Large companies need to build social issues into strategy in a way which reflects their actual business importance. They need to articulate business's social contribution and define its ultimate purpose in a way that has more subtlety than “the business of business is business” worldview and is less defensive than most current CSR approaches. It can help to view the relationship between big business and society in this respect as an implicit “social contract.”



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David Foster Wallace on Leadership

David Foster Wallace on Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

“A leader’s real ‘authority’ is a power you voluntarily give him, and you grant him this authority not with resentment or resignation but happily.”


In a culture that calls pop culture celebrities “thought-leaders” and looks for “leadership ability” in kindergartners, we’re left wondering what leadership actually means and questioning what makes a great leader.


The best definition of the essence beneath the leadership buzzword comes from David Foster Wallace. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This is a beautifully curated story by Maria Popova on Brain Pickings.


Also discover Debbie Millman's felt-on-felt typographic art piece and reading that captures the wisdom from Wallace’s essay “Up, Simba: Seven Days on the Trail of an Anticandidate."


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The Art of Self-Renewal: A Timeless 1964 Field Guide to Keeping Your Company and Your Soul Vibrantly Alive

The Art of Self-Renewal: A Timeless 1964 Field Guide to Keeping Your Company and Your Soul Vibrantly Alive | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Self-Renewal: The Individual and the Innovative Society is a forgotten book of extraordinary prescience and warm wisdom, which rings even timelier today. It’s a must-read as much for entrepreneurs and leaders seeking to infuse their organizations with ongoing vitality as it is for all of us as individuals, on our private trajectories of self-transcendence and personal growth.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

John W. Gardner's book is a gem!!! 


I also recommend that you read a speech given by John W. Gardner that I Scooped earlier: Personal renewal.  

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Tom Wojick's curator insight, October 23, 8:22 AM

This is one book everyone needs to read not tomorrow - Today! 

David Hain's curator insight, October 23, 10:08 AM

"The renewal of societies and organizations can go forward only if someone cares. Apathy and lowered motivation are the most widely noted characteristics of a civilization on the downward path." ~ John W. Gardner

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Make the Right Choices to Create a Winning Strategy

Make the Right Choices to Create a Winning Strategy | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Under A. G. Lafley’s leadership from 2000 till 2010, Procter & Gamble's sales doubled, profits quadrupled, market value increased by more than $100 billion, and its portfolio of billion-dollar brands – such as Pampers, Olay, and Gillette – grew from 10 to 24 as a result of P&G’s focus on winning strategic choices, consumer-driven innovation, and reliable, sustainable growth.


This is the story of the strategic choices that founded P&G’s transformation.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

I sat down with Roger Martin and asked him to share some insights about the framework that transformed P&G and made strategy a part of the culture and thinking of the company.


The interview with Roger Martin relates to the book Playing to Win, which he co-authored with A. G. Lafley. 


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Our obsession with heroic sustainability leaders will leave us all disappointed

Our obsession with heroic sustainability leaders will leave us all disappointed | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

We need to let go of the assumption that captains of industry must control, rather than liberate and empower, people and nature.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The damaging consequence of a focus on traits is that it suggests we need to select the right people to run our lives, rather than consider what forms of hierarchy or non-hierarchy can elicit the best group behaviours to achieve desired goals.


Instead of a focus on heroes with great traits, to develop sustainability leadership we should enhance our understanding of how to develop leaderful groups, where senior role holders act as hosts not heroes, and enable leadership to emerge from within the group.


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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, December 8, 8:48 AM

Right... although to search for traits helping leaders being more apt to lead the more and more complexity remains always searching for traits determining the potentially useful leaders...

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What Are Your Values? Let Me Get Back to You

Surveys consistently identify five key leadership traits: integrity, strategic thinking, adaptability to change, ability to work in a team, and communication skills.


“While acquired skills such as math, finance, analytics, and accounting are important,” Holger Kluge says, “their demand varies from time to time. In business, your personal traits, or soft skills, like communications, collaboration, thinking, and leadership, are just as important and maybe a deciding factor in your long-term career.”

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

There is no such thing as a minor lapse in integrity. Ethics starts with you and your value system and the company that employs you.


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11 Leadership Lessons from Alexander the Great

11 Leadership Lessons from Alexander the Great | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Although the ‘Great Man’ theory of leadership belongs to the scrapheap of history, its allure continues to mystify. Underlying this theory is the assumption that if the right man (yes, it is often assumed to be a man) for the job emerges, he will almost magically take control of a situation and lead a group of people into safety or success. While such leaders are rare, there are times when a singular individual steps out from the crowd and serves as a paragon of leadership.


One such individual was Alexander the Great; one of history’s most famous warriors and a legend of almost divine status in his own lifetime. He falls into the elite category of individuals who changed the history of civilisation and shaped the present world as we know it.



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Visionary, team builder, mentor, he shows us some timeless leadership lessons but also some glaring failures.

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What Maslow’s Hierarchy Won’t Tell You About Motivation

What Maslow’s Hierarchy Won’t Tell You About Motivation | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Despite the popularity of Maslow’s Hierarchy, there is not much recent data to support it. Contemporary science — specifically Dr. Edward Deci, hundreds of Self-Determination Theory researchers, and thousands of studies — instead points to three universal psychological needs. If you really want to advantage of this new science – rather than focusing on a pyramid of needs – you should focus on: autonomy, relatedness, and competence.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Autonomy is people’s need to perceive that they have choices, that what they are doing is of their own volition, and that they are the source of their own actions. The way leaders frame information and situations either promotes the likelihood that a person will perceive autonomy or undermines it.


To promote autonomy:

  1. Frame goals and timelines as essential information to assure a person’s success, rather than as dictates or ways to hold people accountable.
  2. Refrain from incentivizing people through competitions and games. Few people have learned the skill of shifting the reason why they’re competing from an external one (winning a prize or gaining status) to a higher-quality one (an opportunity to fulfill a meaningful goal).
  3. Don’t apply pressure to perform. Sustained peak performance is a result of people acting because they choose to — not because they feel they have to.


Relatedness is people’s need to care about and be cared about by others, to feel connected to others without concerns about ulterior motives, and to feel that they are contributing to something greater than themselves. Leaders have a great opportunity to help people derive meaning from their work.


To deepen relatedness:

  1. Validate the exploration of feelings in the workplace. Be willing to ask people how they feel about an assigned project or goal and listen to their response. All behavior may not be acceptable, but all feelings are worth exploring.
  2. Take time to facilitate the development of people’s values at work — then help them align those values with their goals. It is impossible to link work to values if individuals don’t know what their values are.
  3. Connect people’s work to a noble purpose.


Competence is people’s need to feel effective at meeting every-day challenges and opportunities, demonstrating skill over time, and feeling a sense of growth and flourishing. Leaders can rekindle people’s desire to grow and learn.


To develop people’s competence:

  1. Make resources available for learning. What message does it send about values for learning and developing competence when training budgets are the first casualty of economic cutbacks?
  2. Set learning goals — not just the traditional results-oriented and outcome goals.
  3. At the end of each day, instead of asking, “What did you achieve today?” ask “What did you learn today? How did you grow today in ways that will help you and others tomorrow?”


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Steve Bax's curator insight, November 27, 10:58 AM

An interesting viewpoint on Maslow scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen. The core principles of Maslow's Hierarchy remain both valid and important for leaders to understand in addition to this, in my view. .  

Lauran Star's curator insight, November 28, 4:06 PM

Understanding what motivates you brings greater success!

 

Sue Gaardboe's curator insight, November 28, 4:55 PM

This struck such a cord with me.  I can pin point the moment when I recognised that my life was my responsibility, and can see the energy that flowed from that realisation and how it's influenced every decision and action in my life. We introduce the idea to our students in a general way, (Why is it your Mum's fault that you left your homework at home?Isn't it your responsibility?) but certainly don't help them to appreciate it deeply in their lives.

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The Art of Leadersheep

The Art of Leadersheep | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it
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Martha Pérez Chitty's curator insight, November 30, 3:35 AM

If only all leaders could apply at least half of that! ... We all would be learning something and not just following someone, we all would be creating and not beeing created, we all would be improving and not beeing reprobed...

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Understanding “New Power”

Understanding “New Power” | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Old power works like a currency. It is held by few. Once gained, it is jealously guarded, and the powerful have a substantial store of it to spend. It is closed, inaccessible, and leader-driven. It downloads, and it captures.

New power operates differently, like a current. It is made by many. It is open, participatory, and peer-driven. It uploads, and it distributes. Like water or electricity, it’s most forceful when it surges. The goal with new power is not to hoard it but to channel it.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The crowd is challenging traditional leadership. Here’s how to harness its energy.


Watch also Jeremy Heimans's talk on What New Power Looks Like from TED in Berlin.


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Humble Leaders Most Effective - Especially When in Power

Too often, being humble is linked to iconic spiritual or political leaders -- instead of humility in leadership in the business world. New research by Milton Sousa of Rotterdam School of Management, Erasmus University reveals that the more power you have as a leader, the more humility will help to be a successful one.


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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, November 26, 1:40 AM

With great power comes great humility:-)...at least for the servant leaders:-))..and it works other way round too....with great humility you rise to the positions of great power.

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Clay Christensen on Peter Drucker

Clay Christensen on Peter Drucker | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Managers today know that their enterprises depend on frequent, important innovation, but they lack good frameworks and tools to act on that recognition. Management science as it is taught today and embedded in firms’ structures and processes still assumes that the introduction of a new offering – let alone a new business model – is the exceptional event and not the norm.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Great points by Clayton Christensen: 


My observation of what’s happened is that, today, the people convened for that senior executive meeting all have different languages that they speak. One speaks finance, one speaks HR, one speaks operations, and so on. They have discovered that, if they translate all of their initiatives into numbers, then everyone can talk about them.


When you put the agenda together, all of the options that people need to decide upon are translated into numbers. And so the evaluation of the ideas quickly turns into a review of how good the numbers look, as opposed to being a substantive discussion about things that are not known.


The fork in the road for managers is this: if finance, which has been the kingpin for the last fifty years, is no longer the kingpin, what will be? The only viable alternative is talent, so that managers must learn better how to help people become more capable.



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David Hain's curator insight, November 22, 5:04 AM

One of today's business gurus on another.  Double bubble!

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, November 23, 12:51 AM

Talent (or people focus) will replace numbers (or financial focus) in the new lingua frnca of the executives.

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Finding a Corporate Culture that Drives Growth

Finding a Corporate Culture that Drives Growth | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Corporate leaders and academics have been debating the connection between institutional culture and growth for more than three decades. Yet most can’t really put their finger on the single aspect of an organization’s culture that’s most effective at driving financial performance.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

In recent research published in the August 2014 Journal of Organizational Behavior, Stanford professor Charles A. O’Reilly teamed with colleagues Jennifer A. Chatman and Bernadette Doerr at the University of California–Berkeley and David F. Caldwell at Santa Clara University.  


The research concluded that “adaptive” corporate cultures are more effective at driving financial performance.


Adaptive cultures encourage:

  • Risk-taking
  • A willingness to experiment
  • Innovation
  • Personal initiative
  • Fast decision-making and execution
  • Ability to spot unique opportunities


Adaptive cultures are also notable for the behaviors they choose to minimize. There’s less emphasis on being careful, predictable, avoiding conflict, and making your numbers.


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Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, October 30, 11:18 AM

Research has found that corporate cultures that emphasize adaptability generally produce “revenue growth, market and book value, ‘most admired’ ratings, employee satisfaction, and stock analysts’ recommendations.”

Christian Bartosik's curator insight, November 14, 11:14 AM

The research concluded that “adaptive” corporate cultures are more effective at driving financial performance.

 

Adaptive cultures encourage:

Risk-takingA willingness to experimentInnovationPersonal initiativeFast decision-making and executionAbility to spot unique opportunities

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Is leadership ready for the social age?

Is leadership ready for the social age? | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The social age is a revolution; one that affects all parts of the business model. The way an organization creates, delivers and captures value. The way a business talks with employees, customers, communities, even regulators and government. And certainly the way leaders lead and behave.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The biggest challenge the world has seen since the Industrial Age isn't the internet or social media. It is transparency.


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David Hain's curator insight, October 28, 5:20 AM

"The business world needs: Less jargon, more sincerity, less propaganda, more value, less process, more humanity." ` @PeterAceto

donhornsby's curator insight, October 28, 8:42 AM

(From the article) So we face a big challenge. But it certainly is not Facebook, Twitter or the latest social media platform. The biggest challenge the world has seen since the Industrial Age is not social media. It is transparency.

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The Wisdom of Peter Drucker from A to Z

The Wisdom of Peter Drucker from A to Z | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Known widely as the father of management, Peter Drucker formulated many concepts about business that we now take for granted. Here is an overview of Drucker's contributions, from A to Z.


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James Schreier's curator insight, October 27, 9:16 AM

What wisdom -- at the time -- and now timeless!

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What Peter Drucker Knew About 2020

What Peter Drucker Knew About 2020 | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Leaders and organizations cannot win in today’s business world with yesterday’s tools and strategies. The mindsets, attitudes, processes and leadership competencies that have served us well in the past, are not likely to secure success today, or in the near future.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

In this HBR blog post leading up to the Global Peter Drucker Forum in Vienna, Rick Wartzman takes a closer look at six management imperatives for the knowledge age. Inspired by the great Peter F. Drucker. 

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David Hain's curator insight, October 17, 2:55 AM

Via @Kenneth Mikkelsen, well worth following the Global Peter Drucker Forum in Vienna.

Tony Park's curator insight, October 17, 5:33 AM

Ours is “the first society in which ‘honest work’ does not mean a callused hand,” Drucker noted