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Leaders in search of followership

Leaders in search of followership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

In a conversation with Barbara Kellerman journalist Kenneth Mikkelsen explores why leadership is so hard to exercise today. This is a must read for everyone interested in leadership and management trends. 

 
The interview with Barbara Kellerman relates to her latest book: "The End of Leadership."

 

Barbara raises the important questions: Why are our leaders so widely disdained—and why is our trust in leaders of every stripe at a leaden low? Why do incompetence and intemperance continue rampant? Why are ethics so elusive? Why is teaching leading full of “flaws”? Why has it proved so hard to build a body of knowledge? Why has the leadership industry, for all its apparent successes, failed on so many levels? 

 

Barbara has strong opinions about the leadership industry. She doesn't believe that becomming a leader is a quick fix that can be learned from a seven-step guide written by former CEOs or short and expensive leadership courses.

 

For futher information:

 

Visit Barbara Kellerman’s personal blog: http://barbarakellerman.com.

 

Barbara Kellerman discusses some of the core topics of her book in this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIo5_eJs5-Y.

 

Get inspirered from this video about followership: Leadership from a dancing guy: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hO8MwBZl-Vc

 

Curated by Kenneth Mikkelsen on http://www.scoop.it/t/leadershipabc

 

 

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Fernando Mazzuli's curator insight, August 23, 2013 9:00 AM

Real leadership development - something that takes time and reflection, involves personal values, context and effective practices.

rob halkes's curator insight, July 22, 9:14 AM

Leadership : as much a factor in good health as medical knowledge..


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About LeadershipABC

About LeadershipABC | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The purpose of this site - LeadershipABC - is to help leaders rethink, redefine, and reshape their organizations and themselves to meet the challenges of the future.


I collect stories on leadership/management, that I find useful, educational, and inspirational to others. 

 

It is no longer a futuristic vision to talk about a volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous business environment. It is the reality that most leaders face every day. 

The way we work is fundamentally under pressure and it is evident that leaders must develop new responses and capabilities to navigate in the world and stay relevant. 

                                                 ★★★★★


I believe that knowledge is everything. Knowledge is ideas. Knowledge is power. Knowledge is hope. 

But only if it is shared and applied.


That is why I created LeadershipABC on Scoop.it. My personal aim is to provide you with stories you can learn and grow from. The kind of stories that provokes personal reflection and constructive action. 

I'm co-founder of Future Associates, a consultancy that helps visionary companies identify and tackle the big shifts in the world by cultivating the skills, mindsets, and organizational cultures needed to succeed in times of change.


You're welcome to connect via: 

 

LinkedIn: www.linkedin.com/in/kennethmikkelsen

Google+: https://plus.google.com/+KennethMikkelsen

Twitter: www.twitter.com/LeadershipABC

 

I hope you'll be inspired.

 

Enjoy!

 

Kenneth

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First Know Yourself, Then Your Team

First Know Yourself, Then Your Team | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Effective leaders are those who meet the needs of their followers; pay careful attention to group processes; are able to calm anxieties and arouse hopes and know how to liberate and inspire people to positive action. To create or manage an effective organisation we need to understand the complexity of why leaders and followers act the way they do and accept that people are not one dimensional entities but intricate beings with rich and myriad motivational drivers and decision-making patterns.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Understanding how an organisation works is not enough. To be truly effective, a leader must understand the unconscious motivations of people around them.

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To Be Interesting - You Need To Be Interested

To Be Interesting - You Need To Be Interested | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

In these head-spinning times, even more so than when John Gardner offered his timeless advice, the challenge for leaders is not to out-hustle, out-muscle, or out-maneuver the competition. It is toout-think the competition in ways big and small, to develop a unique point of view about the future and get there before anyone else does.


It takes a real sense of personal commitment, especially after you’ve arrived at a position of power and responsibility, to push yourself to grow and challenge conventional wisdom. Which is why two of the most important questions leaders face are as simple as they are profound: Are you learning, as an organization and as an individual, as fast as the world is changing? Are you as determined to stay interested as to be interesting?

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:


To be interesting you need to be interested. 


Being an influential leader draws on an openness to being influenced. And the best way to be interesting is to be interested. Someone who finds excitement in what they can learn from others and show a genuine interest. Leaders that listen to other people’s stories and then draws them into an activity connected to that story are often considered being interesting, likeable and trustworthy.

 

To be worth following, leaders will need to work primarily on the contribution they make, rather than the direction they give to others. This requires them to develop enough executive maturity to be able to see participation as an opportunity to create value rather than a threat to their existence.

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What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It

What VUCA Really Means for You, Getting Prepared and Agile with It | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

VUCA, short for volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity, and a catchall for “Hey, it’s crazy out there!”    It’s also misleading: VUCA conflates four distinct types of challenges that demand four distinct types of responses. That makes it difficult to know how to approach a challenging situation and easy to use VUCA as a crutch, a way to throw off the hard work of strategy and planning—after all, you can’t prepare for a VUCA world, right?
 

Actually, you can. Here is a guide to identifying, getting ready for, and responding to events in each of the four VUCA categories.

Authors:  Nathan Bennett and G. James Lemoine

Related posts by Deb:

      

   


 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The world of work is increasingly volatile, uncertain, complex and ambiguous. As a result it is time to view surprises as the new normal and steady state as the exception. The difference over the past decade is the increasing speed at which leaders need to address multiple challenges, often at the same time.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, September 1, 10:52 AM

VUCA is a term from the military, put into popular use by futurist Bob Johansen in 2010, as mentioned in his book, now in a its second edition,  Leaders Make the Future: Ten New Leadership Skills for an Uncertain World.  The quadrant model depicted, by authors  is handy for thinking through what you can learn and do to be fully prepared and agile enough for this VUCA world.  ~  Deb

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Human Leadership: Servant, Appreciative, WE-Centric, and Tribal Leadership

Human Leadership: Servant, Appreciative, WE-Centric, and Tribal Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Servant, Appreciative, WE-Centric, and Tribal Leadership are four very practical leadership models focused on Organizational Health.


While each model contributes a unique worldview regarding human nature, they share various overlapping aspects concerning Human Leadership.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Superb background information on Servant, Appreciative, WE-Centric, and Tribal Leadership by Si Alhir.


A recommended read. 


You can follow Si on Twitter here

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, August 31, 5:14 AM

Human Leardership: Servant, Aprreciative

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 31, 3:41 PM

Actually, I understand nothing from the post but the diagram has enchanted me...:-))) surely the problem must be with me because who can find out such an amazing diagram, surely knows other things as well... I still am not on that level but love the diagram...:-)))

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Leadership in Social Enterprise

Leaders of social enterprises face manifold challenges: many leaders do not have a formal business education and were driven by the passion to solve a social cause. Their intrinsic motivation comes first and economic reasons rank low. But business procedures need to be implemented, teams built and money earned to run a social enterprise successfully. To support them, this manual sets out to answer the following question: What are the key challenges for social entrepreneurs when it comes to leadership?

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, August 24, 7:09 AM

Leaders of Social Enterprise

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The Most Surprising Attribute of Great Leaders

The Most Surprising Attribute of Great Leaders | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Great leaders should be bombastic, omniscient, controlling and possessed of the easy confidence that their decisions are right.


People want certainty, they need authority.


Or do they?


New research published in Administrative Science Quarterly once again finds that it’s humility which can produce the best performance from an organisation.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

The finding comes from interviews with CEOs of 63 Chinese companies and around 1,000 of their employees.


They found that CEOs who were humble were more likely to empower the top management team, which in turn enabled the management team to be better integrated.

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How Google Has Changed Management, 10 Years After its IPO

How Google Has Changed Management, 10 Years After its IPO | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Google went public 10 years ago today, and since then has dramatically changed the way the world accesses information. It has also helped shape the practice of management. Staying true to its roots as an engineering-centric company, Google has stood out both for its early skepticism of the value of managers as well as for its novel, often quantitative approaches to management decisions. Along the way it became famous for its reliance on exceedingly difficult interview questions — later abandoned — and its “20% time” policy — reportedly on its way out.


In honor of the company’s milestone, here’s a reading list of some of the best things Harvard Business Review has published on the company since its founding in 1998.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Excellent overview of the best Harvard Business Review articles on Google.

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Managers Can Motivate Employees with One Word

Managers Can Motivate Employees with One Word | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Human beings are profoundly social — we are hardwired to connect to one another and to want to work together. Frankly, we would never have survived as a species without our instinctive desire to live and work in groups, because physically we are just not strong or scary enough.


Tons of research has documented how important being social is to us. 


Theoretically, the modern workplace should be bursting with relatedness. Not unlike our hunter-gatherer ancestors, most of us are on teams. And teams ought to be a bountiful source of “relatedness” rewards.


But here’s the irony: While we may have team goals and team meetings and be judged according to our team performance, very few of us actually do our work in teams.


Blog post by Heidi Grant Halvorsen on HBR. 


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

What we need is a way to give employees the feeling of working as a team, even when they technically aren’t. And thanks to new research by Priyanka Carr and Greg Walton of Stanford University, we now know one powerful way to do this: simply saying the word “together.”

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The Best Leaders “Talk the Walk”

The Best Leaders “Talk the Walk” | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

One of the most ubiquitous aphorisms in business is that the best leaders understand the need to “walk the talk” — that is, their behavior and day-to-day actions have to match the aspirations they have for their colleagues and organization.


But the more time I spend with game-changing innovators and high-performing companies, the more I appreciate the need for leaders to “talk the walk” — that is, to be able to explain, in language that is unique to their field and compelling to their colleagues and customers, why what they do matters and how they expect to win.


The only sustainable form of business leadership is thought leadership. And leaders that think differently about their business invariably talk about it differently as well.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

A fine HBR blog post by Bill Taylor. You can follow him on Twitter here: @practicallyrad.

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Tony Adams's curator insight, August 11, 1:21 AM

Very thought provoking.  We often talk about "walking the talk" but in this article, the focus is very much on leaders "talking the walk" - explaining "in language that is unique to their field and compelling to their colleagues and customers, why what they do matters and how they expect to win". 

 

I like the idea that thinking differently about the way we approach our business leads us to talk differently about it as well - Thought Leadership as a catalyst for helping people see and understand our business in a different way.

 

A really interesting post.

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The Importance Of Perspective-Taking In Leadership

The Importance Of Perspective-Taking In Leadership | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Whether you’re selling a product, pitching an idea, or trying to get employees to do something different or do something in a different way, perspective-taking has become an essential element in moving others.


Over the last decade, social scientists like Adam Galinsky of Columbia University have deepened our understanding of perspective-taking. Their work yields three ways leaders can become more effective.


1. CHECK YOUR POWER. Galinsky and others have found that when people feel powerful, their perspective-taking abilities degrade. The more powerful we feel, the more we anchor in our own perspective rather than adjusting to another’s. And that can make others less likely to go along. But briefly reducing one’s feelings of power (“Maybe this employee I’m asking to do something needs our company much less than our company needs her.”) can increase the acuity of our perspective-taking, which in turn can make us more effective.


2. PERSPECTIVE-TAKING ISN’T TOUCHY-FEELY. Perspective-taking sounds a lot like empathy, but the two qualities are siblings, not identical twins. Empathy — the ability to understand another’s emotional state — is an essential human quality. But research has shown that, in commercial settings such as negotiations, understanding the other side’s thoughts and interests, not simply their emotions and feelings, can be more effective in forging a deal. So if you’re in a high-stakes leadership situation, definitely be emotionally intelligent. But use your head as much as your heart.


3. DON’T FORGET MIMICRY. Mimicking others’ posture, gesture, and expressions sounds like the sleazy tactics of a used car salesman. But ample research has shown that mimicry is a natural part of human behavior, an instinctive way we understand others. You can enhance your attunement skills, and thereby your leadership, simply by being conscious of how the other person is standing, moving, and talking and ever so slightly mirroring what they’re doing.


By Daniel Pink. 

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Interesting experiment mentioned in Dan's blog post: 


First, with the hand you use for writing, snap your fingers five times quickly. Now, with the forefinger of that hand, on your forehead draw a capital E. Believe it or not, how you drew that letter might reveal how you act as a leader.


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Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, August 7, 12:39 PM

There's no doubt that leaders who fully appreciate their organization's  and their followers perspectives will be much more effective. It is after all, what defines their job. 

David Jardin's curator insight, August 16, 12:40 PM

Perspective enhances relationships when it lets us see past WHAT someone did to help/anger/hurt/etc. to understand WHY they did it.

Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, August 26, 10:25 PM

Succinct and helpful ideas to think about for any leader. 

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Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History

Management’s Three Eras: A Brief History | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Today, we are in the midst of another fundamental rethinking of what organizations are and for what purpose they exist. If organizations existed in the execution era to create scale and in the expertise era to provide advanced services, today many are looking to organizations to create complete and meaningful experiences. I would argue that management has entered a new era of empathy.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Important blog post by Rita Gunther McGrath on the changing nature of management. 

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Alex Watson's curator insight, August 1, 3:07 PM

It's an interesting post on a popular topic. Has management entered a new era of empathy? I've had both good and bad managers. Of course that is a subjective view and my opinion and experience of good may not be that of another. One thing I will say...I have learned a lot from all of my managers good and bad. We often learn a lot through osmosis and observation. So even distasteful experiences leave much food for thought and progress. 

 

As for the future of management in organisations. Much management theory past and present is built on a set of historic assumptions. Many managers of yesterday, are not managers of today and so on.  There have always been managers with empathy, as well as those lacking. Who is the manager's manager? That usually says a lot. 

 

In terms of hierarchy. Some people have unwavering faith in hierarchy and would not know how to operate outside of  that context. I've always wondered how come in many organisations, some people put so much credence on what 'management' say? Often...its because of job security, and acceptance of a status quo. Regardless of the merits of management decision making. So...when any person, practice  or prevailing wind comes along to challenge this status quo...disruption whether subtle or overt is usually not far away.

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The Skills Leaders Need at Every Level

The Skills Leaders Need at Every Level | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Are some skills less important for leaders at certain levels of the organization? Or is there a set of skills fundamental to every level?


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Joseph Folkman and Jack Zenger compiled a dataset in which they asked 332,860 bosses, peers, and subordinates what skills have the greatest impact on a leader’s success in the position the respondents currently hold. Each respondent selected the top four competencies out of a list of 16 that were provided. They then compared the results for managers at different levels.


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Jerry Busone's curator insight, August 2, 7:18 AM

Core skills every leader needs

Jacob M Engel's curator insight, August 3, 7:31 AM

These skills are critical on every level and a great predictor of success!

Miss Write's curator insight, August 19, 10:35 AM

These seem to be common sense so why are so many companies getting it so wrong with their managerial placements

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Hey CEOs, Social Media is Watching You

Hey CEOs, Social Media is Watching You | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Everyone messes up from time to time. But these days, the ever-vigilant public can call even the rich and powerful to account.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Maintaining privacy as a leader is harder than ever with smartphones present on every street corner and 24/7 publication channels like Twitter and YouTube. In this day and age followers feel entitled to pry into their leaders’ private lives - and to hold them accountable for what they do. As the culture changes and technology along with it, followers today are familiar with the flaws of leaders, with the foibles of leaders, as they never were before. Chief executives’ every move is scrutinized, analyzed and criticized not only what they do in the present, but also what they did in the past. 


Barbara Kellerman wrote about the fundamental shift in leadership/followership causes by social media in her book: "The End of Leadership."  


You can watch a video with Barbara talking about the book here

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Capitalism's Future Is Already Here

Capitalism's Future Is Already Here | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

A new era is emerging.


Harking back to Peter Drucker’s insistence in 1973 that “there is only one valid definition of business purpose: to create a customer,” Roger Martin has declared that we are finally entering “the age of customer capitalism.”  If firms serve customers well, Martin asserts, benefits for shareholders and the community follow. Customers as stakeholders become the new center of the capitalist universe and its new gospel.


The shift in goal entails a transformation in management practices from those of hierarchical bureaucracy, including a shift from controlling individuals to enabling teams, networks, and ecosystems; a shift in the way work is coordinated from rules, plans, and reports to agile processes and dynamic linking; a shift from the values of efficiency and predictability to those of continuous improvement and transparency; and a shift from one-way, top-down communications to interactive conversations. These shifts are not just a grab-bag of unconnected management gadgets. They constitute a coherent constellation of leadership and management practices, as described by more than a score of books.


Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

This post is part of a series of perspectives by leading thinkers participating in the Sixth Annual Global Drucker Forum, November 13-14, 2014 in Vienna. For more information, see the conference homepage.

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The Shifts and the Shocks

The Shifts and the Shocks | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Martin Wolf is an influential commentator. His weekly column in the Financial Times is required reading for the international financial elite. Paul Krugman of the New York Times may be the darling of the left and the Wall Street Journal editorial page the bible of many on the right, but inside finance ministries few are cited as often as Mr Wolf.


He likes to admonish policymakers. As a centrist who favours free trade and free markets, though, he does so from within the mainstream.


That makes his latest book striking. "The Shifts and the Shocks" is a fierce indictment of the global economy and a call for radical reform.



Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Wolf asks if we are now on a sustainable course when it comes to finance, and concludes that we are not, arguing further crises in the future seem like a certainty.


Read also Joseph Stiglitz's review of ‘The Shifts and the Shocks’ in Financial Times here


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A Framework for Understanding VUCA

A Framework for Understanding VUCA | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Executives have taken to using the military acronym VUCA–Voltility, Uncertainty, Complexity, Ambiguity–to describe the world in which they operate and to ask that question: In a VUCA world, what’s the point of strategy?


Strategy does still have a purpose, but building one in a VUCA environment requires more nuanced thinking. And treating those four traits as a single idea leads to poorer decision making. Watch and listen as Nathan Bennett provides a framework, first featured in an HBR article, for how you should deal with a world that includes V, and U, and C, and A.




Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

How to build strategy in a world that's volatile, uncertain, complex, and ambiguous.

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Can Overthinking Reduce a Leader's Influence?

Can Overthinking Reduce a Leader's Influence? | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

We've all seen this: The CEO who acts instinctively, sometimes with terrible results, keeps his or her job and even develops a loyal following. Meanwhile, the thinker in the executive suite who consistently offers the right, deliberated answer rarely gets a promotion.



Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Researchers at Stanford GSB set out to answer the question of whether we sometimes penalize thoughtfulness — not in ourselves, but when we see it in others.


View the Research Paper here: 

Thought Calibration: How Thinking Just the Right Amount Increases One’s Influence and Appeal


Social Psychological and Personality Science, April 2014.


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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 25, 3:35 AM

Well, rest the common sense of the right balance... all attempts to break into actionable pieces what is in the very actual situation is impossible are futile... sometimes intuition is better than too much thinking and sometimes intuition puts things astray...it's a bit mote complicated than "less thinking & moreintuition"" (see books like "Think twice",  "Think again" or Kahneman's...)...

 

Of course and it' an interesting aspect that the  staff is how influenced by how the decision is made... decisions might be powerful  and  with full of confidence made by either by more thinking by more by intuition, the essence is the  congruity, the authenticity of those making it and the transparence of the process...

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, August 25, 4:54 AM

I guess it is time we realised that overthinking and overanalyzing do not give good returns after all! The ideal CEO is a person who can handle various tasks without getting bogged down by a single task due to over thinking. However, there are many of us who become obsessed with somehow getting to the rooot of a particular problem without realising that we are neglecting other tasks!

Dan Forbes's curator insight, August 25, 7:46 AM

Let me think about this....

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12 TED Talks on how to be a great leader

12 TED Talks on how to be a great leader | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

What makes a great leader? The ability to rule with an iron fist? Being well-liked? These TED speakers offer nuanced takes on how to inspire others to follow you.

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Great Leadership Isn’t About You

Great Leadership Isn’t About You | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

The most effective form of leadership is supportive. It is collaborative. It is never assigning a task, role or function to another that we ourselves would not be willing to perform. For all practical purposes, leading well is as simple as remembering to remain others-centered instead of self-centered.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

I strongly encourage you to read this great blog post by @John Michel.


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Being of Service: The Bridge to Meaning and Mission

Being of Service: The Bridge to Meaning and Mission | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Being of service means becoming bigger than our normal selves and turning our focus to others - and it works the same way in business.


Value creation is the essence of business. Value is what attracts and retains customers and employees. It’s also what attracts and maintains relationships with investors, suppliers, distributors and other stakeholders who are critical to the firm’s success over time. A business that does not create value will eventually fail.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Excellent blog post by Gideon Rosenblatt.

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5 Steps For Leading Through Adaptive Change

5 Steps For Leading Through Adaptive Change | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Leadership and management are two distinctly different but complimentary skill sets that all companies need. Leaders make sure the organization is doing the right things, while managers make sure they do those things right. Leadership is about coping with change while management is about coping with complex issues. Both are qualities that can be learned and both require constant focus on improvement. Especially when the organization is facing potential adaptive challenges.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Five key steps for leading an organization that faces adaptive challenges.

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Josie Gibson's curator insight, August 12, 6:20 PM

Thanks to @LeadershipABC for highlighting this article.

Eric Chan Wei Chiang's curator insight, August 12, 11:25 PM

These five steps may seem very simple but they are often taken for granted. To give direction a leader must take ownership and have a vision. Managing conflict and providing protection are often not pleasant and require great maturity from leaders. Shaping the norms and clarifying roles is often not given a very high priority as it involves intangible people skills.

 

Read more scoops on change and leadership here: http://www.scoop.it/t/on-leaders-and-managers/?tag=Change

http://www.scoop.it/t/on-leaders-and-managers/?tag=Leadership

Jay Roth's curator insight, August 17, 4:33 PM

Perfect article to suggest (in schools) WHY the trainings of Cognitive Coaching, Adaptive Schools, and Polarity Thinking is necessary!

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Schumpeter: Decluttering the company

Schumpeter: Decluttering the company | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

PETER DRUCKER once observed that, “Much of what we call management consists of making it difficult for people to work.” Nine years after the management guru’s death, his remark is truer than ever: employees often have to negotiate a mass of clutter—from bulging inboxes to endless meetings and long lists of objectives to box-tick—before they can focus on their real work. For the past 50 years manufacturers have battled successfully to streamline their factory floors and make them “lean”.


Today, businesses of all types need to do the same in their offices.

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Tania Tytherleigh's curator insight, August 3, 6:57 AM

Organisations are filled with 'clutter'. From tiers of management, to increasingly complex corporate objectives, meetings and emails. Clutter takes a toll on morale and productivity. Organisations must set time aside to 'spring clean' the clutter - when will you do yours?

Michael Binzer's curator insight, August 4, 3:36 AM

So true. Too much cluttering - how can we remove it? Read XL R8 by John Kotter. One option?

Graeme Reid's curator insight, August 5, 1:57 AM

There is a lot of decluttering to do in most organisations.

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The Recent History of Management

From the era of stagnation to the renaissance.


  • How do companies evolve?
  • When do managers appear? Why?
  • What do they typically do?
  • What is great management?
  • What is the place of managers in an agile organization?


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Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 2, 5:14 AM

3 types of managers... good...

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Leading in the 21st century

Leading in the 21st century | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

Wharton School professor Michael Useem scopes out the leadership challenges facing executives today:


Because the world is now more complicated and more uncertain, I think that on top of always having a great vision there will be a premium on thinking strategically and on being able to come back from setbacks, and maybe above all, on being very good at reading the increasingly ambiguous and uncertain universe we operate in.


Companies probably focus too much on the bottom line, too much on meeting quarterly analyst expectations, and this has cost us companies paying attention to what the country needs or what the world needs or certainly what the community requires.



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Elaine Cox's curator insight, August 1, 4:28 AM

I like the way he has identified that companies need to pay more attention to "what the country needs or what the world needs or certainly what the community requires".

Anne Juvanteny's curator insight, August 4, 6:16 PM

un prof de wharton qui reconnaît les limites d'un mode de management largement inspiré des anglo-saxons ... Un signe de la fin d'un monde.

Scooped by Kenneth Mikkelsen
Scoop.it!

Where Do You Stand? The Shifting Ground of Strategy

Where Do You Stand? The Shifting Ground of Strategy | LeadershipABC | Scoop.it

We’re all trying our best to remain standing, but the ground beneath us is shifting at an accelerating rate. The implications for strategy are profound, but few have explored this terrain.

Kenneth Mikkelsen's insight:

Excerpt from John's blog post: 


Make no mistake about it, if all you do is focus on learning within the four walls of your firm, you’ve already lost. The key to scaling learning is to be able to reach out beyond your enterprise and find ways to connect with world-class participants in a broad array of complementary domains in ways that will help all participants to learn faster.


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