Leadership to cha...
Follow
Find
8.5K views | +0 today
 
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
onto Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century
Scoop.it!

Beta: The Courage to Fail & Change

Beta: The Courage to Fail & Change | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Most of this post is actually a post I wrote over two years ago.  It's interesting that you can write something and then forget about it, and then you stumble across it one day and think, "I forgot...
more...
No comment yet.

From around the web

Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century
Support for school leaders to expand reform initiatives
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

The four traits of collaborative leadership - Virgin.com

The four traits of collaborative leadership - Virgin.com | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
In the latest in our series about The Future of Work, Katie McCrory explores the changing nature of leadership. Some say being a CEO is the loneliest job in the world. Perched right at the top of that org chart, responsible for every tough business decision, knowing you can never forge true friendsh...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

Technology can transform education, but not without people #ISTE2015 - A.J. Juliani

Technology can transform education, but not without people #ISTE2015 - A.J. Juliani | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
It’s been five years since I joined Twitter. To be honest, I didn’t know what Twitter was all about when I joined. I knew that I wanted to share what I was writing with the world, and besides my Mom, my friends, and my wife (sometimes) there was no one out there who seemed particularly …
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

The Need for More Leaders and Less Bosses

The Need for More Leaders and Less Bosses | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Do you work for a boss or with a leader? Are you a boss or a leader? This is an extremely important question where the answer is probably indicative of the climate in which you work and the success (or lack thereof) of change initiatives.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

Final Exams...a Tradition Worth Exploring

Final Exams...a Tradition Worth Exploring | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
I have been having many conversations this year with teachers about our practice of administering final exams for students. Although I cannot confirm with certainty, I recently read that the final ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

How to Exponentially Increase Your Influence

How to Exponentially Increase Your Influence | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Leaders frequently make miscalculations in trying to influence change. Too often, they bet on a single source of influence rather than tap into a diverse arsenal of strategies. Our research shows tha…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

MIT in new collaboration to transform teaching in the digital age

MIT in new collaboration to transform teaching in the digital age | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
MIT does not have an education school, but it's just announced a big new initiative with the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation on elementary and secondary teacher training.  From MIT Ne...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

The Acceleration of Leadership and Learning

The Acceleration of Leadership and Learning | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
I am a lot smarter now than I was five years ago. Simply saying that out loud to people, tends to throw them off and sometimes even suggest there is a certain arrogance in the statement, but I am c...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

Tony Wagner: All Students Need Digital Portfolios

Tony Wagner: All Students Need Digital Portfolios | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
When Pathbrite went to SXSW Edu, one of our team members had the luck of
catching a talk from Harvard Innovation Expert Tony Wagner, in which he
gave his expert opinion on exactly what students need for success:

 

 

  

The single most important thing you could do tomorrow for little to no
money is have every student establish a digital portfolio where they
collect their best work as evidence of their skills. Where they’re
working with their teachers and other adults to present their best
work, to iterate their best work, so that they actually have real
progress they can show. 

 

After his presentation, Tony was good enough to sit for an interview,
sharing some of his expertise and opinions with our users. Check out the
interview below!

 

What does it mean to be an expert in innovation?

Well, in practice what it means is that I have office hours at the Harvard
Innovation Lab, and any student anywhere in the university can make an
appointment with me to discuss some kind of new enterprise they want to
start or that they are currently engaged in. It can be for profit, it can
be nonprofit, but it’s a part of an effort to more broadly support
students’ initiatives in the university.  

 

This trend with innovation, how do you think this relates to our country’s
current education model?

It doesn't at all. Our current education model, our “Theory of Change”, or
whatever you want to call it, it’s hopelessly broken. We're
incentivizing bad teaching. We're measuring the wrong skills with a
punitive system that is bound to draw the best out of the profession and
bore students out of their minds. But other than that, it’s fine.

 

What do you think is really needed to prepare students for the workplace?
What are employers looking for? It sounds like you don’t think students are
receiving the necessary education.

No. I think right now the Theory of Change is that it’s only our poor kids
who have bad schools, and if we make our bad schools incrementally better
for our poor kids by testing them more frequently and holding teachers more
accountable, everything’s going to be well. But there’s absolutely zero
evidence for that. [Students need] three things: they need content
knowledge, but that’s the easy part today. It’s online; you don’t need a
teacher to acquire content. The world simply doesn’t care how much you know
anymore because Google knows everything. What the world cares about, now
that content has become a commodity, is what you can do with what you know.
And that suggests the two other education outcomes that are absolutely
critical, and to simplify them I call them skill and will. Students need a
new set of skills to thrive for work learning and citizenship in the 21st
century; and they need will, meaning motivation, and arguably the most
important is motivation. Because if you are motivated you will continuously
learn new skills and new content knowledge, which you will have to in this
era, and its the thing we do the most damage to in our schools today.

 

"Our current education model, our “Theory of Change”, or whatever you
want to call it, it’s hopelessly broken."

 

 

How do you think we damage the motivation aspect?

Because we don’t give kids work worth doing. We give kids a lot of mindless
tasks, a lot of memorization tasks, things that they could easily look up
on their [smartphone], they’re required to memorize, and the moment the
test is over they forget it—if they remembered it at all. We’re not giving
kids work that is intrinsically interesting in the vast majority of our
schools, and we’re spending far too much time on test prep, and the tests
themselves are predominantly multiple choice factual recall tests that tell
us absolutely nothing about work learning or citizenship readiness in the
21st century. Kids know it, and they’re bored out of their minds.

 

You said something along the lines of, “the single most important thing you
can do tomorrow is have every student establish a digital portfolio.” Why
is a portfolio so important?

It goes right back to the heart of the question of student motivation, of
will, of giving students work worth doing. You know, I used to teach high
school English, and I used to teach writing, and I discovered somewhere
along the way that if you give kids two things: first, an opportunity to
write about things they’re interested in, or care about, or are excited
about, and secondly, they’re writing for a real audience, it totally
transforms the classroom It dramatically accelerates learning to write
well. So I think a digital portfolio potentially goes a ways toward
accomplishing both goals. Giving students an opportunity to do work worth
doing, saving it, and sharing it. I think longer term, strategically, what
we need to be doing, particularly at the high school level, is sending a
message to colleges that test scores and even GPAs don’t tell the most
important story about the student. GPA’s certainly more important that
tests scores. Test scores are virtually useless. GPA is somewhat useless
but would be far more useful if students’ digital portfolios would be
reviewed as a part of the application process. […] I think the whole idea
of a digital portfolio is part of what I call Accountability 2.0, moving
away from an over-reliance on stupid tests and moving towards really
looking at student work and having students meet a performance standard for
passing on to higher grades and for graduating from high school. And it […]
can be an important factor in motivating kids to want to do better work.

 

 "I think the whole idea of a digital portfolio is part of what I call
Accountability 2.0; moving away from an overreliance on stupid tests
and moving towards really looking at student work."

 

 

For students who are graduating and entering the workforce, it seems like
most employers are looking for qualities like critical thinking,
communication, and problem solving. How do you think a portfolio will help
these students demonstrate that they have these qualities?

Well I think that’s the challenge where teachers have to give students work
that demands critical thinking, problem solving, and that they expect a
high standard for communication skills and collaboration skills. And the
digital portfolio provides students with an opportunity to show mastery.
And also—this is very important—to show progress over time. You know, you
go to High Tech High website [a network of schools in San Diego] and you
can click on samples of digital portfolios of students at the school where
you see students describe a problem they’re working on. "Well, you know,
right now this semester I’m really trying to get better with my opening
paragraphs for my essays, and then, towards the end of the semester, and
you’ll see some work in progress, toward the ends of the semester they’ll
reflect and say: Well, you know I think I really got this now, I think my
opening paragraphs are so much better, here’s a recent one of mine." So,
that whole idea of assessing students according to a body of work and
progress over time, in mastering core competencies, is exactly what a
digital portfolio allows that other forms of assessment do not.

 

Does everybody need a digital portfolio?

Well, let’s look at the broader trends. Google is a fascinating example.
Google used to only hire kids who had gone to name-brand colleges, and
would only interview kids from those colleges who had the highest GPAs and
test scores. Well Laszlo Bock comes along, analyzes data like a good
Googler, and discovers that these indices are “worthless.” His words, not
mine. He goes on to say that the skills you need to succeed in a
competitive academic environment bear absolutely no relationship to the
skills you need to succeed in an innovation economy. So now, Google doesn’t
even ask for your transcript. You go onto the website for job listings, the
word college does not even appear, and 15% of their hires don’t have a B.A.
degree at all. What do they do now? They rely on structured interviews and
evidence. See, we talk about being data-driven in education, it’s an
obsession, but in fact the real world is evidence-based, not merely data
driven. And a digital portfolio can be one of the best forms of evidence of
competency and accomplishments. And I think more and more employers are
going to simply say, “I’m sorry, we don’t trust your transcripts. It
doesn’t tell us a damn thing. It doesn’t tell us anything important.” […]
What if more and more students had evidence in their portfolios that they
knew how to solve problems collaboratively, videos, testimonials, evidence
from their internships and so on. I think it’s going to be a powerful tool
in the world of work for hiring and it ought to be a more powerful tool for
admission to colleges.

 

TONY WAGNER currently serves as an Expert In Residence at Harvard
University’s new Innovation Lab. Prior to this appointment, Tony was the
first Innovation Education Fellow at the Technology & Entrepreneurship
Center at Harvard, and the founder and co-director of the Change Leadership
Group at the Harvard Graduate School of Education for more than a decade.
His previous work experience includes twelve years as a high school
teacher, K-8 principal, university professor in teacher education, and
founding executive director of Educators for Social Responsibility.

Tony earned an M.A.T. and an Ed.D. at the Harvard University Graduate
School of Education.

Source: http://www.tonywagner.com/
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

Response: Ways To Help Students Develop Digital Portfolios

Response: Ways To Help Students Develop Digital Portfolios | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Several educators - Rusul Alrubail, Michael Fisher, Frank Serafina, Kristin Ziemke, Kate Muhtaris, Jeb Schenck, and Joe Rommel - share suggestions on how to effectively utilize digital portfolios with students.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

3 Ways to Cultivate a Growth Mindset

3 Ways to Cultivate a Growth Mindset | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Blog post at Brilliant or Insane : Stanford University psychologist Carol Dweck’s best-selling book, Mindset: The New Psychology of Success, started a revolution in most of [..]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

10 Things Successful People Do To Maximize Their Time

10 Things Successful People Do To Maximize Their Time | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Learn from the masters how you can be successful at maximizing your time
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

Leading Innovation for Systemic Change

Leading Innovation for Systemic Change | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Several days ago, I found this short video from Scott McLeod through Twitter. In the video @mcleod posits the next "big thing" in educational technology will be learner agency - a technology-rich l...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

Why I’m scared of the future of education | World of Learning

Why I’m scared of the future of education | World of Learning | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Our world is advancing very quickly, but is the U.S. education system lagging behind?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

A high school that refuses to conform to standardization

A high school that refuses to conform to standardization | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Third in a series of profiles of high schools that have been honored for being 'Schools of Opportunity.'
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

5 Rarely Considered Obstacles To 21st Century Education

5 Rarely Considered Obstacles To 21st Century Education | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
What are the biggest obstacles to changing education? Some are economic. Others are infrastructural. Few are technological. The most significant challenges are philosophical. We are wedded to particular ways of thinking about school and learning and life that are limiting our ability to best serve our children. The way we live [...]
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

50 Global Entrepreneurs Recommend 50 Books That Forever Impacted Their Lives

50 Global Entrepreneurs Recommend 50 Books That Forever Impacted Their Lives | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
My Facebook group of business owners from around the world share their favorites.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

"Throwing Out the Clock" on Teacher Education

"Throwing Out the Clock" on Teacher Education | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
As I have written before, the United States is experiencing profound, continuous, and accelerating change as the country makes a transition from a national, analog, industrial economy to a global, digital information economy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

5 Questions To Drive Personal-Professional Learning

5 Questions To Drive Personal-Professional Learning | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
In a world where more and more people realize their voice matters, simply engaging people is not enough.  People need to feel empowered in the process of work and learning.  The shift from complian...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

ASCD Express 10.19 - Feedback That Feeds Forward Empowers a Growth Mind-Set

ASCD Express 10.19 - Feedback That Feeds Forward Empowers a Growth Mind-Set | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner. Our 175,000 members in 119 countries are professional educators from all levels and subject areas––superintendents, supervisors, principals, teachers, professors of education, and school board members.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

A Principal's Reflections: The Need For Digital Literacy

A Principal's Reflections: The Need For Digital Literacy | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

Deeper Learning in Practice

Deeper Learning in Practice | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
In the deeper learning framework, students are encouraged to master academic content, think critically, work collaboratively, communicate effectively, learn how to learn, and develop academic mindsets.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Grant Montgomery
Scoop.it!

Does Your School Have a Culture of Innovation?

Does Your School Have a Culture of Innovation? | Leadership to change our schools' cultures for the 21st Century | Scoop.it
By Gretchen Morgan - A new tool created to help schools, districts or state agencies evaluate the degree to which they have a culture of innovation.
more...
No comment yet.