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Leadership Think Tank
Educational leadership in action
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How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - Edudemic

How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - Edudemic | Leadership Think Tank | Scoop.it
When we talk about how our education system is failing our students, there are a lot of different options presented on how to ‘fix’ it. Everyone has an answer, a promising new way of thinking, a potential magic bullet. Inevitably, we also examine school systems that are working as a part of investigating what to do …

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, July 27, 7:25 PM

I rarely assigned homework. It seemed counter-productive and counter-intuitive. The exception, if can be called homework, were projects which engaged students and their parents at home. This provided an untapped resource, excited students and parents, and was highly successful. I always provided more time for these projects so they did not work against learning.

Mika Auramo's comment, July 27, 10:00 PM
Too much false information, including topic.
Debra Evans's curator insight, July 28, 2:54 PM

Good piece, but need to consider also; this country is not really catering to multi-cultural group.  But, we should learn from their examples - we in Australia definitely moving towards over-educating, with even prep losing its play-based approach.  Also worth noting - the teacher in the classroom has the biggest impact on whether or not the students will learn - effective teachers=effective learners.

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Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers

Alternatives To Homework: A Chart For Teachers | Leadership Think Tank | Scoop.it

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 17, 2013 7:50 PM

What if instead of giving homework to our students we asked them to come up with ideas? This chart provides a variety of alternative ways to look at homework. The post describes this as "Rather than simply a list of alternatives to homework, it instead contextualizes the need for work at home (or, “homework”). It does this by taking typical classroom situations–the introduction of new material, demonstrating a procedure, etc.), and offering alternatives to traditional homework assignments."

Consider asking your students what they would suggest doing instead of homework. What might you be able to add to these suggestions?

 

Nancy Jones's curator insight, June 19, 2013 6:40 AM

Love this! 21st century learning isn't as much about technology as it is thinking .allowing choices and options like this not only allow students choices but the opportunity for deeper thinking.

Laura Jane's curator insight, December 15, 2013 9:17 PM

I stole this from Jamie, and couldn't agree more! What a great [and practical] resource to have as we go into the final semester of our internships. This chart is chock full of ideas for creating more authentic and less monotonous homework for students. It focuses on reinforcing, and not memorizing. 

 

These strategies could work for all grade levels, to different extents. This again addresses the quality vs quantity debate. One of my favorite examples is to reinforce a skill that has been taught. It suggests that, instead of asking students to solve 10 word probelms to prove that they know a skill, to have them work in groups to solve, model, and present one deeper thinking word probelm.

 

This allows students to work in harmony to formulate their ideas, and is a more productive approach to learning. Although some cognitive struggle is good, too much leads to frustration and defeat. Allowing students to work together helps them to actively participate in student-centered learning, and they can better understand what they've learned. I will definitely be printing this chart to put in my lesson planning binder.

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5 Ways to Use Humor as Incentive for Homework

5 Ways to Use Humor as Incentive for Homework | Leadership Think Tank | Scoop.it

We may forget that humor may be used as an incentive for homework. Although this post is geared to homework (and therefore parents) much of it is applicable to the teacher in the classroom. With suggestions of different ways to use humor as well as links to a variety of resources available online there is much fun to be had as you explore this post!


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Is China Copying Finland With Its Proposed "No HOmework" Policy?

Is China Copying Finland With Its Proposed "No HOmework" Policy? | Leadership Think Tank | Scoop.it
     After reading the article, I agree with Pasi. China is not borrowing a page from Finland’s playbook. I’ll explain how I see it. China is seeking to de-emphasize homework for its...

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6 fabulous iPad Apps to Help Students in Their Studies

6 fabulous iPad Apps to Help Students in Their Studies | Leadership Think Tank | Scoop.it

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15 Reasons Reformers Are Looking to Finland - Online Universities

15 Reasons Reformers Are Looking to Finland - Online Universities | Leadership Think Tank | Scoop.it
Read on to learn why so many education reformers are enamored with Finnish education and what their system can teach us about reforming our own.

Why are people looking at Finland? Their students have "consistently scored near or at the top of international assessments regardless of economic or social background, despite spending fewer hours in school that their American counterparts."

Some of the 15 points listed are below, and each point is followed with additional information.

* Schools don't assign much homework.

* Classwork focuses on creativity.

* All schools in Finland are public schools.

* Finland is all about cooperation in education, not competition.


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