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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teacher Learning Networks
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Here We Go Again! Does Teaching Kids To Get 'Gritty' Help Them Get Ahead?

Here We Go Again! Does Teaching Kids To Get 'Gritty' Help Them Get Ahead? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Education circles are abuzz with a new concept: that resilience and persistence are just as important as intelligence to predicting student success and achievement. But can "grit" actually be taught?

Via Linda Alexander
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Grit is not teachable, but it is learnable. Placed in caring and supportive environments, students have the opportunity to learn grit and what it takes to succeed. This means adults have to know when to help and when to step back based on the child. I used Costa and Kallick's habits of mind along with critical thinking as a foundation and it works.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, March 17, 2014 1:10 PM

Before quickly trotting down this "gritty path", please note that strong, evidence based research does not exist on this concept yet. It is mostly antidotal. And the grit movement is clearly a push back from education's decades long love affair with the "self-esteem" movement.  And, yes, it makes logical sense at a "gut" level, especially within the more affluent communities where cutting, eating disorders, at-risk behaviors, and teen suicides have become far too common.  But how is grit being operationalized within schools?  An example offered on NPR is one school deciding to toss-out their multiple intelligences curriculum because "life doesn't always throw challenges at someone according to their preferred learning style(s)".  Well, that's true.  (BTW: Multiple intelligences as a concept has its own theoretical battle-wounds)  Balance is probably the best operative word as teachers (and parents) tend to throw the baby out with the bathwater when it comes to new learning concepts.   Ultimately, extrapolating "grit" from other notable character traits may prove to be quite difficult.  My take....

Linda Alexander's comment, March 17, 2014 4:41 PM
Ivon, I agree with your comments. Grit, or whatever term you prefer, must be dished out according to the needs of the child. I know many children learn grit every single day of their lives.....
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, March 17, 2014 7:53 PM
Well said Linda.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from School Leadership, Leadership, in General, Tools and Resources, Advice and humor
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Peering into Learning | Peeragogy.org

Peering into Learning | Peeragogy.org | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In this part of the Peeragogy Handbook, we “peeragogues” have summarised the most important and applicable research and insights from two years of inquiry and discussion. Although there’s been no shortage of experimentation and formal research into collaborative, connective, and shared learning systems in the past, there is a new rumbling among education thinkers that suggests that when combined with new platforms and technologies, peer-learning strategies as described here could have a huge impact on the way educational institutions evolve in the future. We’ve also seen for ourselves how peer-learning techniques can help anyone who’s interested to become a more effective informal educator.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching is not producing. It is an act of praxis which involves forming. We do not produce students as finished products. They and teachers are always forming. This is much closer to Dewey and Vygotsky than it is to Plato and other Greek philosophers.

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mercè perelló's curator insight, March 16, 2014 4:15 AM

"Technology can, to some degree and in certain contexts, replace “know how” with “know where to look.”

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from E-Learning-Inclusivo (Mashup)
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Preparing Teachers for Deeper Learning - Getting Smart by Tom Vander Ark - deeper learning, Hewlett Foundation, teacher preparation

Preparing Teachers for Deeper Learning - Getting Smart by Tom Vander Ark - deeper learning, Hewlett Foundation, teacher preparation | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A system of teacher development linked to the needs of hiring entities that awarded licenses based on demonstrated competence would provide personalized development pathways for teachers and ensure well-trained teachers for schools.

Via juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I find it interesting that we want to prepare good citizens. Preparing good people with strong character leads to good citizens. I will take the latter over the former, because I will get the former. Plato had a theory of educating for good citizens. It was very narrow. Is that what we want?

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Education Adds
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Why It’s Imperative to Teach Students How to Question as the Ultimate Survival Skill

Why It’s Imperative to Teach Students How to Question as the Ultimate Survival Skill | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Are our schools doing a good job of preparing students for a world where questioning is a survival skill?

Via Agron S. Dida
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article poses some good questions. Are we preparing children for the future if they cannot ask survival questions?

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Edu-Vision- Educational Leadership
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The Life-Changing Power of Extracurricular Activities

The Life-Changing Power of Extracurricular Activities | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It’s the semifinal round of the county debate tournament.  The prize: a ticket to the county debate championship and a trip to Washington DC for nationals.  Our varsity debate team went 4-0 in the preliminaries and smoked the competition in the...

Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Both extracurricular and complementary courses provide a powerful way for many students to shine.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Management Matters - Leadership is learning
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The essence of leadership?

The essence of leadership? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Leadership for me has very little to do with being 'out in front', 'up on top', 'ahead of the game' ... and everything to do with this - ... the person in front, and the person behind. For me it's ...

Via Kandy Woodfield
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a nice concise list of qualities and essences that leadership possess. It is not about a role, but a way of being.

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Kandy Woodfield's comment, March 25, 2014 4:56 PM
Thanks Ivon exactly what I was aiming for.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Coaching Leaders
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Leadership Gold Nuggets From Around The World - Part 7 - 12 of 27

Leadership Gold Nuggets From Around The World - Part 7 - 12 of 27 | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This is the second of a multi-part article on the wisdom and insights gained from the 2012 International Leadership Blogathon.  The first part is located here: (...)

Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The titles alone are interesting suggesting the articles are worthy of looking into more closely.

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David Hain's curator insight, March 14, 2014 9:54 AM

Some great articles, worth revisiting, from @toddbnielsen.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Trends in Education and Technology
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Embrace The Power of Learning Communities

Embrace The Power of Learning Communities | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Learning communities can meet a variety of needs, but they all have one thing in common: connecting and empowering today's educators.

Via Fishtree Education
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The feeling of community is often what is missing in schools.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Leadership
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Simple Mistakes That Leaders Unintentionally Make

Simple Mistakes That Leaders Unintentionally Make | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Are you too focused on the big stuff and missing the important details? Here Inc. columnists identify simple mistakes overlooked by even the most diligent of leaders.

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

An article I recently read pointed out that leaders entrain themselves and see what they expect to see. An effective way to overcome this can be writing reflective journals and asking direct questions about process. We are often surprised by the little things we overlook and how important they are.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teacher's corner
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What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn?

What Keeps Students Motivated to Learn? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What keeps students motivated to learn? Relevance, connections, and their teachers' emotional investment, among just a few criteria.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers and students want to find meaning in their learning which suggests choice. Integrating learning makes sense because it is more likely to appeal to students.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Education and Training
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Test-based accountability has done "untold damage to the profession of teaching."

Test-based accountability has done "untold damage to the profession of teaching." | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

By Marc Tucker

 

"There is little doubt—whether test-based accountability is being used to hold schools accountable or individual teachers—that it has failed to improve student performance."

 

"Reducing everything they have tried to do for their students to scores on low-level tests of two subjects makes a mockery of their work."


Via Mel Riddile, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Here is something radical that takes beyond the criticism of accountability and tests. What if we provided classroom teachers with more voice in the curriculum being delivered in their classrooms with live students?

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for the love of learning: Return of the Math Wars

for the love of learning: Return of the Math Wars | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This article points out that nothing has changed as much as things change. The author draws on Piaget's work, but many of the deep educational thinkers would agree with the conclusions. We need to teach rather than expect just letting kids explore on their own will work.

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When Does Micromanagement Become Harassment

When Does Micromanagement Become Harassment | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Two words that get used a lot these days are micromanagement and harassment. The two concepts come from different sources, but they converge in the extreme case. This article dissects the two conce...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Managers often justify their micromanagement as staff who are unable to do the work. They use code like "this is better than the alternatives" suggesting dire circumstances which bring us in line. It does for some, but, for others, it just makes the more resentful. Either way, it is a loss.

 

I worked in school jurisdiction that talked about win-win, whatever that is, but rarely did I see staff winning. It is all a one-sided position.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Innovation & Creativity
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Eight Scientific Strategies To Improve Creativity

Eight Scientific Strategies To Improve Creativity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Strategies anyone can use to improve their capacity to innovate.

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is good advice in each of the eight and they are general enough they will create other ideas. Thinking about and implementing these would be helpful in education.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Edu-Vision- Educational Leadership
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Why It Requires a Community To Transform Education For the 21st Century

Why It Requires a Community To Transform Education For the 21st Century | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Source: EdTechReview
Image Courtesy
It is hard to imagine a time when the opportunity and need to transform education has been greater.

Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

And, community should not be understood as teams where someone at the top decides the agenda and what is to be achieved. Community also suggests that there are multiple communities which influence members and each other.

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Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, March 18, 2014 6:02 PM

Thoughtful insight that helps trainers to focus on relevant aspects when working with teachers

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Influence vs manipulation
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These Simple 3 Words Can Change The Life Of All The Young And Ambitious

These Simple 3 Words Can Change The Life Of All The Young And Ambitious | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Sometimes, the young and ambitious ones become frustrated as they see the world and face the reality. But don’t you get demotivated yet! I have three words to change your life: create, big, and defy. Have you got three minutes?


Via Margaret Driscoll, Learning Organization Librarian, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article puts a different spin on the way we influence things. It is less about work and being in a personal creative space.

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TonyDeblauwe's curator insight, March 21, 2014 11:38 AM

Works for anyone I think - only control what you can

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Why Good Managers Are So Rare

Why Good Managers Are So Rare | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Gallup has found that one of the most important decisions companies make is simply whom they name manager. Yet our analysis suggests that they usually get it wrong. In fact, Gallup finds that companies fail to choose the candidate with the right talent for the job 82% of the time.

 

Bad managers cost businesses billions of dollars each year, and having too many of them can bring down a company. The only defense against this massive problem is a good offense, because when companies get these decisions wrong, nothing fixes it. Businesses that get it right, however, and hire managers based on talent will thrive and gain a significant competitive advantage.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Chris Argyris identified many things overlooked in corporate culture, big and small. In education, there is too much management. Many of the building managers would benefit from spending time in classrooms teaching and figuring out what brought them into education.

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donhornsby's curator insight, March 16, 2014 9:12 AM

(From the article):Very few people are able to pull off all five of the requirements of good management. Most managers end up with team members who are at best indifferent toward their work — or are at worst hell-bent on spreading their negativity to colleagues and customers. However, when companies can increase their number of talented managers and double the rate of engaged employees, they achieve, on average, 147% higher earnings per share than their competition.

Kimberley Richardson's curator insight, March 17, 2014 1:59 PM

Great managers begin with great people.  When they bring out the best in themselves, they bring out the best in others. ~quote #genuineleaders #leadership

Efficienarta's curator insight, March 19, 2014 4:44 AM

What values do you use to help make decisions on Manager appointments? Do you put enough effort into selecting and developing first line supervisors / managers? (As Tom Peters puts it - a most critical strategic decision) .http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t7ue3XwGMAw)

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Innovation & Creativity
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18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently

18 Things Highly Creative People Do Differently | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
'Inspiration and ideas often arise seemingly out of nowhere and then fail to show up when we most need them, and creative thinking requires complex cognition yet is completely distinct from the thinking process.'

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Innovation and creativity are complex processes. There may be more than 18 things, but this is a good start. It would be interesting to consider some of the practices as they apply to education. Do we allow daydreaming and solitude?

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leading and learning: Educational Readings : John Hattie, PISA , Steve Wheeler, Vygotsky, and Zong Zhao et all

leading and learning: Educational Readings : John Hattie, PISA , Steve Wheeler, Vygotsky, and Zong Zhao et all | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article called "If not for those Darn Kids" is interesting. I would take it one step further and suggest that many teachers are not that keen about teaching. It could be that a lack of meaning has bred cynicism in many.

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Just-in-Time Teaching: An Interactive Engagement Pedagogy

Just-in-Time Teaching: An Interactive Engagement Pedagogy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Suppose you are teaching an introductory biology course and your next lesson deals with genetics. You would like to prepare your students for the upcoming class by asking them to think about the topi

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The types of questions posed lead students into real-life learning that is different than corporate learning. Students learn their curiosity is an important feature of their learning.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Purposeful Pedagogy
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Innovative education model challenges teachers to adjust ...

Innovative education model challenges teachers to adjust ... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Karthik Subburam, a five-year veteran in his first year teaching in the "inquiry-driven, project-based, technology-infused" style of Philadelphia's nationally acclaimed Science Leadership Academy, runs his fingers through his hair.

Via David Mackzum, Ed.D., Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A key in the article is the point that innovation can be relatively low tech or not. Creative teachers are creative for a reason. They understand how to use available resources.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Cultural Trendz
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Does intuition affect decisions?

Does intuition affect decisions? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

As a follow-up to my earlier post about the brain and gut decisions, I want to share my conversation with Erica Ariel Fox for my Leadership: A Master Class about how intuition can factor into good decision-making. Erica Ariel Fox is a lecturer on Law at Harvard Law School, and part of the internationally acclaimed Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School.

“Let’s look at Malcolm Gladwell’s concept of thin-slicing. My interpretation: you are in fact cognitively perceiving data, it’s just that you’re doing it so quickly. With pattern recognition from past experience, what you experience as intuitive is actually just unbelievably quick cognitive processing.

There are also arguments that when the emotional part of the brain is damaged, people can’t make decisions: you need the right and left hand side of the brain, the cognitive and the emotional. I think that is right for certain kinds of decisions, such as when you’re gathering information and trying to make meaning or make sense out of information.

But these approaches to decision-making don’t address what might be called direct knowing: I know this, but I don’t know how I know it. I didn’t read it in a book. Nobody told it to me. I didn’t have an Excel spreadsheet that laid it out for me. Nonetheless, I know it.

I think we have a set of skills that coaches and leaders who work with teams might call “reading the room.” Others call it attunement or discernment. It’s not data processing and thin-slicing, and it’s also not having an emotional evaluation of decisions. It’s a sensing. When I work with a team in crisis, tuning in to the group’s feelings and emotions really helps me ask the right questions about what’s happening.

People will be shocked when they think back over the course of their lives, ‘when I made that decision, I actually knew it was wrong, but I didn’t trust the part of me that was telling me not to do it.’ Or they say, ‘It was the craziest thing. I made this decision. Everyone in my life thought I was insane, but I just knew it was right, and it turned out it was the best decision I ever made.’”

How does this concept resonate with you? How would you explain intuition in relation to decision-making?


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Without reading the article, I would say yes. When I read the article, it bore that out. Complexity science literature points out we use intuition largely below the radar.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Cool School Ideas
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Letter Grades Deserve an 'F'

Letter Grades Deserve an 'F' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The adoption of the Common Core could usher in a new era of standards-based grading.

Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The core of the argument is sound and draws on seminal thinking about student assessment. The addition that might be made is that thinking was based on considerably more teacher autonomy and local community involvement in their schools. I think the two go hand-in-hand. We need teachers to be teaching students and that includes effective assessment which can be communicated to students and their parents.

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 13, 2014 9:57 AM

I think one of the keys is this paragraph: "Teaching and learning with an eye toward mastery of a defined list of competencies circumvents many of the pitfalls that points-based grading causes. If mastery of a specific concept or skill is the stated goal for everyone, students are free to be more creative in their thinking. They are encouraged to challenge themselves in pursuit of that mastery."


Let's be honest: there is a lot of subjectivity in a lot of grading. Perhaps Common Core, for all of its flaws, will challenge us to think differently about how we assess. Not just how we grade student work, but how we make decisions about how students can demonstrate what they know and can do.

iPamba's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:53 AM

More important than the grading system is whether or not, throughout the process of learning, communication strategies and tools are used, including meaningful feedback to learners,  to enable them to recognize their challenges as well as assess their progress and achievement.

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The Ten Commandments of Play-Based Learning

The Ten Commandments of Play-Based Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
My day-to-day work with young children paired with the here-and-there trainings and consultations I do with other early childhood professionals continue to teach me this: one of the most difficult ...

Via Janice Comrie
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Play is central in the writing of many of the great educational thinkers and needs to remain there.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:20 AM

As a mother and a trainer, I really like this list. I think many of these principles would apply to adult learners as well. Adults benefit from a fun environment where they have the opportunity to play and collaborate as a team. Happy playing!

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Why we all need countercultural education

Why we all need countercultural education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here’s another way of looking at the role of education. The author is thinking of schools but I have something broader in mind. More about that below. First, here are the opening paragraphs of “Unp...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Education is about the big topics and not narrow learning. This post refers to Neil Postman's work which suggests schools are a cultural thermostat. It would be nice to get back to that kind of thinking. Educators can become subversive by asking the big questions with no easy answers. These questions keep us coming back for more. Isn't that what education could be?

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