Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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The education question we should be asking

The education question we should be asking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One area of education that doesn’t get enough attention in the loud education reform debate is exactly what is worth learning. In the following post Alfie Kohn explores this problem. Kohn (www.alfiekohn.org) is the author of 13 books about education, parenting, and human behavior, including “The Myth of the Spoiled Child: Challenging the Conventional Wisdom about Children and Parenting,” just published this spring. He lectures widely across the United States and abroad.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is worth learning? This has been a question asked in educational research for some time i.e. John Dewey and is still being asked i.e. Bill Pinar and David Jardine. What is worth whiling over is not a bureaucratic and technocratic question, but one which comes to life in classrooms.

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RJ Lavallee's curator insight, February 13, 2015 7:41 AM

Alfie Kohn. Brilliant

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Leadership is Sharing Who You Are -

Leadership is Sharing Who You Are - | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Leadership is not about becoming someone else; leadership is sharing who you are. People tend to think that becoming a leader is being more like leaders who have gone before us. They try to emulate or even copy the actions of leaders they admire. Students of history draw parallels to situations faced by past leaders. …

Via Anne Leong, Tessie Uranga-MSEd.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Parker Palmer wrote something to the effect authority is authoring our lives. That makes leaders vulnerable. Teachers who sit on the boundary of public and private life embrace this vulnerability. Usually, combined with technical skills, these are the teachers students respect and learn from.

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John Michel's curator insight, June 5, 2014 3:29 AM

People tend to think that becoming a leader is being more like leaders who have gone before us.

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PD - How Teachers are Learning


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Can we learn anytime and anyplace? Yes, we can. Is this part of a new hidden curriculum where we are tethered and shackled to our work?

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frankie roberts's curator insight, June 5, 2014 6:35 AM

I wonder to what degree the blended or even online PD approaches outlined in this intriguing report will be accepted by the teaching community here in Australia? To the best of my knowledge, the majority of PD offerings in Australia are the traditional one:many off-site presentations. There are some instances of in-house literacy coaches such as me in Adelaide who provide on-going mentoring with individual teachers. For our context, in which my teachers and I meet 1:1 weekly and then team-teach once or twice per week, coaching has proven to be an invaluable model. Sustainable teacher capacity is being built and improvement in student literacy outcomes right across the curriculum are being experienced. 

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When PISA meets politics – a lesson from New Zealand

When PISA meets politics – a lesson from New Zealand | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA) rankings have become more of a problem than a solution. (When PISA meets politics – a lesson from New Zealand: The Programme of International Student Assessment (PISA)...

Via Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Poor data is worse than an opinion. We approach teaching and learning as if they are apolitical. They are not. Every teachers engages in a political act every time he/she teaches. We gather data constantly with our senses and it is relevant to our context and situation.

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The Uncomfortable Listener (& Former Problem-Solver). ~ Jeff Sanders

The Uncomfortable Listener (& Former Problem-Solver). ~ Jeff Sanders | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I spoke to convince people to change into something that I was more comfortable with, to alter or change to something to keep it within my existing values.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Quite often, people have the wisdom inside them and want a listener who listens deeply and asks questions. Schools have moved towards coaching, which should be about listening deeply and trusting relationships, but I experienced old-fashioned problem solving and little trust.

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Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus

Six Questions That Will Bring Your Teaching Philosophy into Focus | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Earlier this year, a couple of contributions to The Teaching Professor (Haave 2014) and Faculty Focus (Weimer 2014) discussed the place of learning philosophies in our teaching. The online comments to Weimer’s blog post (2014) made me think more about how we as instructors need to be careful to bridge instructivist and constructivist teaching approaches for students not yet familiar with taking responsibility for their own learning (Venkatesh et al 2013).

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

At the heart of teaching, we should always be asking who is the self that teaches per Parker Palmer.

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How Students Make Progress in Learning

How Students Make Progress in Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When we think and talk about learning, the metaphors we use matter. The language we employ when we describe how learning works can illuminate the process, allowing us to make accurate judgments and predictions—or it can lead us astray, setting up false expectations and giving us a misleading impression of what’s going on.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning at all ages involves complex relationships with what we are learning. When we begin to learn something new, we likely revert to earlier and more primitive approaches as suggested in the article. The metaphor of a beach suggests an ecotone which is the mixed ecosystems where messiness and richness occur.

 

Consider the way teachers are introduced into teaching. They enter a classroom alone, as the only adult there, and are expected to without any direct help make progress which benefits them and the students.

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How Culture Develops | Leadership Principles

How Culture Develops | Leadership Principles | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a great visual and it probably describes many workplaces. Rather than seeing that we have personal strengths and weaknesses which require taking turns to climb the ladder and come back down, we often create meritocracy which privileges differently.

 

My experience as a teacher was we did not want to acknowledge others teaching ability. It was always better to tear people down. This often began with our School managers who attempted, with some success, to pit teachers against each other, teachers against parents, and teachers against students. It protects the status quo and explains why so little has changed in School beyond cosmetic change. That includes the use of digital technologies.

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for the love of learning: Misinformation about Alberta Teachers is dangerous

for the love of learning: Misinformation about Alberta Teachers is dangerous | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Misinformation is dangerous. We think that because the information is coming from an "authorized" source it legitimates it. I am not sure who the task force spoke to and how they gathered their online information. The latter can be problematic in many ways.

 

Having said this, we are skirting the issues. Schooling needs an overhaul. John Dewey spoke about reorganizing (moving deck chairs around) and reconstructing (disposing of unneeded things and ways and bringing in new ways). The latter is not about the latest fad du jour i.e. digital technologies. It is about meeting teaching and learning needs that exist today.

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Great Leaders Don't Have to Know All the Answers

Great Leaders Don't Have to Know All the Answers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Guest post by Robert S. Kaplan

 

Everyone thinks successful leaders always know what to say and the right course to take. They don’t. But they do know the right questions to ask.

Many people believe that great leaders are simply blessed with a knack for having the right answers. They have a natural instinct for leadership because they were born with superior talents, skills, insight and charisma. These executives belong to a rarefied species of people who are able to avoid periods of doubt and confusion and are somehow able to avoid significant setbacks. In short, these people aren’t like the rest of us.

While this image may be appealing, the fact is that the reality is far more complicated.


Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The title says it all. My experience in School was our managers were all about telling us what to do and rarely about asking questions.

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, June 2, 2014 9:47 AM

Robert S. Kaplan about #confused #leaders on @BobTiede Leading with Questions

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An All-Call for a New Style of Leadership

An All-Call for a New Style of Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

It’s time for a new style of leadership. Today’s employees want to work for an organization that they can feel proud of: an organization that has values and viewpoints compatible with their own.


Via Anne Leong, donhornsby, AlGonzalezinfo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When Robert Greenleaf proposed servant-leadership, it was in response to a shift from local communities to large institutional settings. Today, we are facing a new shift involving technology which connects us across time and space.

 

It is not just about using digital technologies. It is about integrating them well and making sense of when a particular tool fits well with a task.

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donhornsby's curator insight, June 2, 2014 8:45 AM

(From the article): Successful leaders know that today’s motivational techniques may satisfy employees only long enough to achieve short-term goals. If you supplement today’s forms of employee motivation by instilling a belief in your organization’s mission and stress the importance of every employee’s contribution, you bring about commitment that motivates people forever. The question is, “Is it possible to create this kind of environment and strive for market leadership?” The answer is, “You don’t have much of a choice.”

AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, June 2, 2014 10:34 AM

Great scoop here via @donhornsby


Here is my favorite section:


Successful leaders know that today’s motivational techniques may satisfy employees only long enough to achieve short-term goals. If you supplement today’s forms of employee motivation by instilling a belief in your organization’s mission and stress the importance of every employee’s contribution, you bring about commitment that motivates people forever.


The question is, “Is it possible to create this kind of environment and strive for market leadership?”


The answer is, “You don’t have much of a choice.”

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At-Risk Students Who Fall Behind Struggle to Catch Up, Study Finds – Head Count - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

At-Risk Students Who Fall Behind Struggle to Catch Up, Study Finds – Head Count - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"The Impostrance of Early Learning" From ACT - Research and Policy Issues

"ACT is committed to helping people achieve education and career success, and the path to college and career readiness starts well before high school. In a series of reports on the importance of early learning, we underscore the importance and explore the challenges of getting students on track to college and career readiness and having them stay on track.


"The report Catching Up to College and Career Readiness (PDF; 12 pages) examines how many “far off track” fourth and eighth graders catch up to college and career readiness before they graduate. Using information on the percentage of students reaching college and career readiness targets over a four-year period as an indicator of the difficulty of doing so, the report focused on students who start out far off track—well below the achievement level that those with average growth trajectories need to reach college and career readiness targets in a specified later grade. The findings indicate that it is exceptionally difficult to close academic preparation gaps.


"The second report, College and Career Readiness: The Importance of Early Learning(PDF; 12 pages), reaffirms the importance of early learning and addresses the growing need of a system to support early learning in schools, as well as the obligation of educators and policymakers to promote public awareness of the advantages of early learning. We discuss components of a strong preschool and elementary school education. In addition, we draw from the ACT Core Practice Framework to describe ways that school and district leaders can support improvement in early-grades learning.


"The third report, College and Career Readiness: The Challenge is Greater for At-Risk Students (PDF; 16 pages), expands on the problem of getting students on track by focusing on at-risk demographic groups. This report shines a light on the need to identify and provide instructional supports early, particularly to students from at-risk demographic groups, to ensure that all students are able to achieve education and career success."

Subscribe to ACT Research and Policy Alerts
Stay current with ACT research on important policy issues with email delivered to your inbox.


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I find this interesting research. It points out that what we are doing in School is not working for everyone. The other point is we have known this for some time. These research findings are not new.

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Do We Need A Revolution In Management?

Do We Need A Revolution In Management? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“Do we need a revolution?” ask Clayton Christensen and Derek van Bever in the June 2014 Harvard Business Review (HBR). “The orthodoxies governing finance are so entrenched that we almost need a modern-day Martin Luther to articulate the need for change.”

 

When “the world’s most influential business thinker” calls for a revolution, maybe we should pay attention. The “revolution”, says the article, would have three parts. (1) “New ways to assess investments in innovation… (2) We should no longer husband capital. It is abundant and cheap… and (3) …new tools for managing the resources that are scarce and costly.”

 

One immediate question: is the needed revolution about acquiring new tools or new management mindsets? New tools applied with existing mindsets risk leading to more of the same. In fact, could applying new mindsets to the existing tools go a long way to the revolution that the HBR article is talking about?

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Tessie Uranga-MSEd.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Quite often, what passes as reform, including management and leadership, is simply shuffling deck chairs around. We need something that reconstructs management and leadership, rather than heaping the latest fad onto what is not working.

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, June 1, 2014 11:05 AM

You can read Clayton Christensen's HBR article here: The Capitalist’s Dilemma.


Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, June 1, 2014 12:56 PM

Clayton Christiansen's thoughts about it...

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Parent: Why I can't 'in good conscience' leave my kids in public school - Washington Post (blog)

Parent: Why I can't 'in good conscience' leave my kids in public school - Washington Post (blog) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Washington Post (blog) Parent: Why I can't 'in good conscience' leave my kids in public school Washington Post (blog) To the other extreme, Jackson then has “feel” and other long e spelling words in late winter/early spring, along with vocabulary...

Via Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

In a province like Alberta, there is no other viable alternative. Public Schools are it. There are some fine teachers in those Schools, but they are often hamstrung by administrators who have lost touch with the classroom and some who spent little time in the classroom. Combine this with shifting political winds i.e. Inspiring Education and Excellent in Teaching and teaching is more challenging than ever. What happens is the latest fad du jour with digital technologies, some form of formulaic curricula, and a focus on inputs and outputs with no real change happening in School.

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Robert Hubert's curator insight, June 5, 2014 10:50 AM

One parents response to the Standardize Tests that their children are/were required to write. 

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Spotting good teaching is not a guessing game

Spotting good teaching is not a guessing game | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It is possible to measure the quality of university teaching in a useful way, argues Graham Gibbs

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is good teaching? I doubt there is a set definition. Maya Angelou offered us the idea that great teaching is about the transforming relationships we recall after many years. Mike Rose in his book Lives on the Boundaries talks about the relational aspects of teaching that touched the lives of students. It is not easy work evaluating what teaching and learning are.

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 5, 2014 11:19 AM

It's easy to tell this article was not written for Americans because we've gotten so squeamish about "'judging" teaching performance. In general, however, the article gets to the complexities of assessing, evaluating, spotting, and/or judging good teaching, and agreeing on what that is.

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VUCA Times Call for DURT Leaders

VUCA Times Call for DURT Leaders | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
VUCA times call on leaders to raise their game, plant the seeds for a better future ahead. VUCA requires strong leadership.

Via ThinDifference, Philippe Vallat, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we are direct, are understood, are reliable, and trustworthy, we send signals about being responsible. The era of accountability and transparency are not about responsibility. We can still hide necessary information in being transparent. We cannot when we are responsible.

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ThinDifference's curator insight, May 28, 2014 8:03 AM

VUCA times require more of leaders not less. Leaders need to be a Direct, Understandable, Reliable, and Trustworthy leader.

Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 4, 2014 12:29 PM

Volatility, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity (aka VUCA)  does require good leadership. But all of the DURT behaviors are important and should be practiced regardless of conditions. Trust as we know is important for robust engagement, clarity is important for  broad alignment, directness is important for superb execution and reliability is important in sustainable adaptation.  Leadership's purpose in VUCA situations and, in general, is to maintain and build effectiveness in achieving results; the DURT behaviors and other Purposeful Leadership  behaviors is at the heart of organizational success regardless of circumstances. 

Anne-Laure Delpech's curator insight, June 5, 2014 2:54 AM

intéressant : les caractéristiques du leader dans un monde VUCA (volatile, incertain, complexe et ambiguë)

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A Matter of Choice - Whole Child Education

A Matter of Choice - Whole Child Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We call on educators, policymakers, business leaders, families, and community members to work together on a whole child approach to education.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Choice is important for both teachers and students.Students who see teachers exercising choice have great role models. Quite often, that is not what is happening in School. Teachers have little room for choice and School is an anti-democratic institution. We are not preparing students for some distant form of democracy. We are providing them with opportunities to enact a democratic process in classrooms. Without teachers who have choice, that does not happen.

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12 Myths that Lead to a Busy, Unfulfilling Life

12 Myths that Lead to a Busy, Unfulfilling Life | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

15 years ago, I quit law school to pursue one overarching question: “Why do capable people fail to break through to the next level?” The answer to the question, to my great surprise, is success. I


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The myths make sense. Three stood out. Myth #3 is a great one in School. I heard School managers suggest their individual fads du jour were based on everyone else doing it. If everyone jumped off the bridge, would we follow?

 

Myth #4 is important. As the one person who spoke up in staff meetings and questioned many of the proposed fads du jour, I was cast as a dissenter and non-team player. For example, my questioning the blind use of digital technologies was seen as opposing their use when I used digital technologies regularly in the classroom.

 

Myth #9 exists in School. I had a manager tell me one time I had to take on a new assignment over and above my existing assignment. When I responded that I would be taking other things off my plate, she was puzzled. I told her I had a life and only 24 hours in each day. That was not what she expected. This one goes with being the team player. The conversation led to me cutting back from 70-80 hour weeks to 50-60 hour work weeks.

 

What was interesting about these three myths was the school division had bought into The Seven Habits of Highly Effective People. The last habit was sharpening the saw and making time for one's self, which seemed to apply to some, but not all.

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Sharrock's curator insight, June 3, 2014 11:03 AM
cognitive dissonance can rear its many heads in so many places in your lives. We need to face these questions and assertions with courage and honesty. Self awareness is very, very difficult to achieve.
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Fractured Culture: Exclusion @julianstodd

Fractured Culture: Exclusion @julianstodd | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I'm prompted to write about exclusion today by a friend who described the bullying she's been subjected to at work. After a protracted period of negativity, she's talked about leaving, about taking...

Via juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The ideas of resistance to new ideas and low permission to experiment are interesting. In School, we have those outside classrooms, School managers, who decide these things.

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“Not Interested in Being #1:” Shanghai May Ditch PISA

“Not Interested in Being #1:” Shanghai May Ditch PISA | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

"our teachers are more used to mark the answers as ‘right’ or ‘wrong,’ while students are hoping their teachers can help them open their minds and point out their problems.”

 

We still need teachers. We need teachers who are active and involved in teaching students and not just marking machines.

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What Kind of Future Are We Leaving For Our Children? | Leadership Principles

What Kind of Future Are We Leaving For Our Children? | Leadership Principles | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an excellent question to always as when it comes to schooling and education.

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Values Based Leader

Values Based Leader | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
At Luck Companies we believe all human beings have extraordinary potential. And as leaders, we believe we have the ability to cultivate that potential in others, and positively impact the lives of those around us. To do so requires us, the leaders, to make a conscious choice to work first on ourselves, ensuring our own state of awareness and alignment to in turn ignite the potential in others.

Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Servant-leadership is about values. One would think that servant-leadership and School would be a great fit. I did not find that to be the case outside the classroom.

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, June 2, 2014 9:45 AM

Mark Fernandes about "The Servant as #Leader" by Robert #Greenleaf

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Why Parents Don't Care

Why Parents Don't Care | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Why Parents Don't Care

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is what makes the role of teachers so important. They are the front line people who can build relationships with students and their families.

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Reason & Existenz

Reason & Existenz | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Philosophizing as a Way of Life

Via Keith Wayne Brown
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This site has numerous interesting articles.

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Keith Wayne Brown's curator insight, June 2, 2014 11:19 AM

Reason and Existenz blog has been very active in the last few days with folks from France, Portugal, and Panama. :)

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Transcript: Ellen Langer — Science of Mindlessness and Mindfulness

Transcript: Ellen Langer — Science of Mindlessness and Mindfulness | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Dr. Ellen Langer: We have these categories, work, life, and we have, um, brains, brawn, you know, so on. All the different, um, distinctions that we make, we make them mindfully, and then we start to use them mindlessly, forgetting that when we’re at work, we’re people. We have the same needs we had when we were on vacation. And you should get to the point where you’re treating yourself whether you’re at work or at play in basically the same way.

Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Langer's work along with that of Jon Kabat-Zinn, Richard Davidson, Jack Kornfield, etc., is extremely important. It bridges the Eastern and Western concepts of mindfulness.

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