Leadership, Innov...
Follow
Find
14.6K views | +20 today
Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Education Adds
Scoop.it!

Why Extra Curricular Activities Are Not Extra

Why Extra Curricular Activities Are Not Extra | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
School districts have been quick to cut music and art programs when budgets get tight, focusing instead on "employable" skills like math and science. But there's a strong body of research indicating that neglecting the arts in school puts students at a cognitive disadvantage throughout life.

Via Agron S. Dida
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students enjoy the low-tech activities i.e. art, food science, phys ed, etc.

more...
TURIOT's curator insight, May 2, 2014 12:21 PM

True-- extra curricular activities build life experiences. 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 21st Century Learning and Teaching
Scoop.it!

The 7Cs of The 21st Century Lifelong Learning Skills

The 7Cs of The 21st Century Lifelong Learning Skills | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These have been important for some time. I struggle with the final one. I am not sure that learning as a concrete enjoyable activity is well-served by career management. I wonder what that means to a kindergarten student.

more...
Gust MEES's curator insight, May 2, 2014 8:36 AM

A MUST read!


Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from SY Assessment
Scoop.it!

Assessing education: have we learnt our lesson?

Assessing education: have we learnt our lesson? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
David Archer: Unesco taskforce report claiming consensus on global education skills is misleading – we may have 250m children in schools, but not all of them are learning

Via Kent Brewer
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Perhaps, if we stopped focusing on preparing children for a distant workplace and focused on them enjoying their learning today, it would make a difference. All children are learning, but they are not necessarily learning what bureaucrats, technocrats, and politicians think they should learn and how they should learn.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Leadership
Scoop.it!

Rethink the grind: Doing less, and avoiding interruptions, can be the key to running a profitable business.

Rethink the grind: Doing less, and avoiding interruptions, can be the key to running a profitable business. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A growing body of research suggests managers are more productive when they limit their work hours and avoid interruptions.

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think that might be the case for all people. It should give us food for thought about what the work world might look like in the future.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Response to Dron (on Connectivism) - by Stephen Downes

Response to Dron (on Connectivism) - by Stephen Downes | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Networks do not learn. The agents within networks learn.

more...
Ana Cristina Pratas's curator insight, May 1, 2014 3:28 AM

"Let me review, for those who are just skimming this post:

   Connectionism - the theory describing how networks learn

   Connectivism - the theory applying that understanding to education

Whether you say one or another is or is not a theory interests me not in the least. But I would assert that (a) each is a distinct understanding of learning that can be distinguished from other approaches that genuinely are called theories, and (b) neither is widely adopted (much less consensus opinion) in learning technology, or education generally, today."

Rose Heaney's curator insight, May 1, 2014 4:47 AM

This is a bit mind boggling & beyond my limited cognitive powers - but together maybe we can process it!  It is relevant to octel too.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Education
Scoop.it!

Education Reform Is Destroying Childhood as We Know It - Huffington Post

Education Reform Is Destroying Childhood as We Know It - Huffington Post | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Education Reform Is Destroying Childhood as We Know It
Huffington Post
When I reflect on my childhood nothing but fond memories come to mind. Growing up in a rural part of western New Jersey sure had its benefits in the 1980's.

Via Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is written from a parent's perspective. It might be a bit idealized, but it raises many questions about the role of school in children's lives and whether 'reforming' schools is useful.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Cultural Trendz
Scoop.it!

7 Simple Steps To Lower Your Stress (No Meditation Or Exercise Required)

7 Simple Steps To Lower Your Stress (No Meditation Or Exercise Required) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

What's the best way for me to piss off a stressed-out client? Tell them to manage his stress by getting more sleep. Or eating better. Or fitting meditation into their day. It's a sure way to make


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Each of the points makes sense.

more...
Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, April 30, 2014 2:33 PM

Good and simple suggestions. My airport pic features a few choice items. That's how I roll. ~ V.B.

David Hain's curator insight, May 1, 2014 2:53 AM

Some profound and practical tips here to alleviate the 21C disease.  We're stressed, and we're stressed about being stressed!

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Future of Work
Scoop.it!

The Time Is Now To Re-Think Your Workplace

The Time Is Now To Re-Think Your Workplace | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Throughout the latter half of the 20th Century, the concept of work and the workplace has remained much the same: eight hours a day, in cubicles, and marked by performance reviews just once per year. 


But now, the workplace has evolved. It has become something that companies no longer take for granted, but rather see as a nexus of innovation, collaboration and a way to attract and retain top talent.



Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Despite the lead which says "death to the office" I did not see this in schools. Instead, I saw the reverse. There were more closed doors where building managers hid in plain sight.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from SY Assessment
Scoop.it!

Assessing Teacher Assessment - Chartered Institute of Educational Assessors

Assessing Teacher Assessment - Chartered Institute of Educational Assessors | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Dr Joanna Goodman, an education consultant and Fellow of the CIEA, considers the importance of professional development in assessment for all teachers, as schools enter a new dawn of developing their own processes.

Via Kent Brewer
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

To be a good teacher a person has to be a good listener and observer. We have to be attentive and mindful to what is happening in our students' learning. Assessment has always been a key to teaching and learning in that way.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Assistant Principal
Scoop.it!

The "Principals" of Building Trust

The "Principals" of Building Trust | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Trusting relationships are a key factor of successful schools. Building a positive professional level of trust forms the foundation that allows staff, students, and communities to take risks, succeed,…

Via Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I liked the numbering process the author used. If each "principle/principal" took time and sought honest feedback in each area, it might make a difference in schools.

more...
Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, April 29, 2014 6:08 PM

Some sage advice for all administrators. The end of the year is a good time to review and plan. 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Cool School Ideas
Scoop.it!

Life of an Educator: A quick & easy way to boost question complexity

Life of an Educator: A quick & easy way to boost question complexity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

In some examples, i.e. pizza the questions involve every day life.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Information Powerhouses
Scoop.it!

How School Libraries Are Staying Relevant | Livability

How School Libraries Are Staying Relevant | Livability | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Forget the Shhhhhhh. School libraries are making noise these days, inspiring lifelong learning with innovative programs, high technology – and fun. In the process, they are re-establishing themselves as vital centers for schools and ...

Via Karen Bonanno, Dr. Laura Sheneman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

School libraries and the relationships, human and otherwise, are important in schools.

more...
Helen Rowling's curator insight, April 27, 2014 1:07 AM

Resource Centres - Action centres full of loud learning with is paces for quietness and others for noisy endeavours.

Anu Ojaranta's curator insight, April 29, 2014 2:09 AM

"Today’s school librarians employ a variety of tools beyond books to educate kids. They use technology to engage students living in a tech-heavy world. They collaborate with teachers to support curriculum. They create “maker” spaces where students can work on arts and crafts projects. They maintain a flexible schedule, so kids can drop in when they wish. And they create a welcoming atmosphere that kids crave."

 
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teacher Tools and Tips
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking for Kids

Critical Thinking for Kids | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bloom's Taxonomy critical thinking questions. I am in love with this!!! :)

Via John R. Walkup, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found the critical thinking we undertook with students was bringing them back to the "right answer" per the curriculum. Is this real critical thinking?

more...
John R. Walkup's curator insight, April 28, 2014 3:16 PM

A nice set of questions that teachers can ask to reach across a wide range of Bloom's Taxonomy.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Organisation Development
Scoop.it!

Hierarchy is dead! Long live Holacracy! ...Right?

Hierarchy is dead! Long live Holacracy! ...Right? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Why do so many articles on implementations of management-less companies being referred to as “eliminating hierarchy” mix that with Holacracy? Why would a company then need Holacracy?


Take the Zappos gets rid of managers example – read on because there’s no mentioning of eliminating hierarchy. They are implementing a holacracy for a clear Purpose: they attempt to prevent bureaucracy from infiltrating Zappos, while maintaining a start-up culture within what is now, a quite large organization. They attempt to build Resilience against bureaucracy. It is what they believe to be needed to maintain a start-up culture.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder what this will look like in schools? It certainly had not made an arrival where I taught. In fact, it might be argued that the hierarchy was firmly entrenched and being reinforced.

more...
Eli Levine's comment, May 3, 2014 11:31 AM
Patrick: I was wondering how it could be applied within the government agencies, I see how it can be applied from government to the larger social and environmental ecosystems. Sorry for the confusion! :)
AleksBlumentals's curator insight, May 6, 2014 3:58 AM

The ideas we have developed and used for at least 4 decades are gradually becoming incorporated into how we think of organizations on a more regular basis

Stephen Dale's curator insight, May 7, 2014 6:18 AM

The article challenges the assumption that holocracy eliminates hierarchies. From the piece: 

 

"Holacracy claims to ....change  the concept of organizational structure from one that is autocratic and top-down to one that is decentralized, organic, and bottom-up. Ultimately, the vision of Holacracy is to allow the emergent, creative properties of the individuals playing roles within an organization to self-organize and flourish, much like human cells are organized into organs, which in turn are organized into bodies and minds, which in turn go forth into the world to express their purpose as humans."


#socbiz

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 3C Media Solutions
Scoop.it!

Flipped learning skepticism: Is flipped learning just self-teaching? - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Flipped learning skepticism: Is flipped learning just self-teaching? - Casting Out Nines - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning, whether it is flipped or unflipped, is not something that happens without teaching.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Purposeful Pedagogy
Scoop.it!

Every Teacher an Innovator

Every Teacher an Innovator | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Joe Mazza believes that, beyond a willingness to integrate the latest technology, true innovation begins with a mindset, something that he encourages all educators to make a part of their job.

Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I know teachers who are very innovative who are not tech-savvy. Being innovative is not about using a particular tool or set of tools. It is creating spaces where students feel comfortable and learn.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Your Keys
Scoop.it!

Want to Be More Creative? Take a Walk

Want to Be More Creative? Take a Walk | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A brief stroll, even one just around your office, can spur creativity, according to a new study.

Via Sílvia Dias
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I find that taking a walk brings a lot into play. Just walking and not thinking about what I have been working on makes a huge difference.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Pedagogy
Scoop.it!

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters

For Students, the Importance of Doing Work That Matters | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If our students look at the work we’re asking them to do today and say “It doesn’t matter,” we’re missing a huge opportunity to help them become the learners they now need to be.

Via Grant Montgomery, The Rice Process, Mikko Hakala
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is important to note the article author, Will Richardson, points out that students who accomplish innovative things i.e. publishing book and inventions are outliers. It does not mean learning in school should not be meaningful. It means the opposite.

more...
Mikko Hakala's curator insight, May 1, 2014 6:31 AM

A good post to provoke teachers think critically what they ask the students to do. How can the students do "work that matters"? That is, meaningful tasks that have potentially a wide audience and that reflect students' own interests.

 

In the traditional way, the student's "assignments" (exams, exercises, projects) are passed to the teacher for a grade, or in a little more advanced situations, to peers for review. Are these felt as "work that matters"? There have been of course plenty of opportunities to design meaningful tasks, but now access to web (global connections, collaboration, sharing) allows to amplify the audience and potential for real-world applications. 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from learning21andbeyond
Scoop.it!

Top 10 tips for teaching the teachers - from an ex-teacher - Innovate My School

Top 10 tips for teaching the teachers - from an ex-teacher - Innovate My School | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It’s been a while since Nicole Ponsford switched sides and handed in her teaching badge. Since then, she’s become acutely aware of the challenges presented by working with her former peers, and finds that not enough non-educators know enough about presenting to teachers. Here, she gives her top 10 pieces of advice on teaching the teachers.

Via Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to improve the way we prepare teachers for classrooms, but it will not happen as a classroom exorcise. We can make them more comfortable in their university learning, but will that translate into their classroom work?

more...
Nancy Jones's curator insight, May 1, 2014 11:01 AM

We all " Get by with a little help from our friends." Some thoughtful ideas.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Coaching Teacher Leaders
Scoop.it!

When Change Has Legs: Educational Leadership

When Change Has Legs:  Educational Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leadership is situational, contextual, and particular.

more...
Mary Perfitt-Nelson's curator insight, April 30, 2014 9:50 PM

Great article regarding what works when schools attempt to make broad changes.  While the administrator must be a political visionary, he/she often cannot be the practical visionary making it happen.  

 

There are conversations worth having around the following key ideas:  

1.  Conversations about the framework

2.  Conversations about community  and 

3. Conversations about institutionalization

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Collaboration
Scoop.it!

How Innovation Ecosystems Turn Outsiders into Collaborators

How Innovation Ecosystems Turn Outsiders into Collaborators | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Running a truly innovative company means constantly improving your innovation culture and process. Running a successful innovation ecosystem, however, demands more. Successful innovation ecosystems make people outside the company measurably smarter, richer, and more innovative. Biologically speaking, innovation ecosystems invest in symbiosis, not parasitism. Growth isn’t zero-sum.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need to ask what it means for environments to be richer. In complexity science, John Holland uses niche as a way demonstrating the needed diversity. Diversity, based on local enrichment, is part of the richness.

 

In schools, each teacher and each student represents a contributor to the local enrichment of a niche which might be a classroom and it might be the topic being learned. Metaphorically, ecological thinking has considerable potential in school-education.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from About leadership
Scoop.it!

Data Alone Won't Get You a Standing Ovation

Data Alone Won't Get You a Standing Ovation | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Your data needs soul to illuminate and inspire.

 

A few years ago, Dr. Brené Brown delivered a presentation on “The power of vulnerability” at TEDx Houston. As a professor at the University of Houston, Brown studies vulnerability, courage, authenticity, and shame. It’s a pretty big subject area to squeeze into 18 minutes, yet Brown did it so well that her presentation has been viewed 15 million times and has turned Brown into a New York Times bestselling author.

 

She began her presentation with a short anecdote:  A couple of years ago, an event planner called me because I was going to do a speaking event. She said, “I’m really struggling with how to write about you on the little flier.” And I thought, “Well, what’s the struggle?” And she said, “Well, I saw you speak, and I’m going to call you a researcher but I’m afraid if I call you a researcher, no one will come because they’ll think you’re boring and irrelevant.” And I was like, “Okay.” And she said, “But the thing I liked about your talk is you’re a storyteller. So I think what I’ll do is just call you a storyteller.”


Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Data and stories blend together. The numbers in quantitative research tell a story. As soon as we start telling the story, we make ourselves vulnerable. In many ways, teaching is storytelling and learning is the unfolding of new stories.

more...
John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, April 30, 2014 2:18 PM

Carmine Gallo on #HarvardBiz: tell  the story behind the #data.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from The Daily Leadership Scoop
Scoop.it!

Want Teamwork? Encourage Free Speech

Want Teamwork? Encourage Free Speech | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By seeking — and appreciating — the views of the entire group, a manager can turn dubious followers into active participants in the task at hand.

Via Jim Manske, John Michel, Rchilli Parser, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

School decisions where I worked were open and shut. There was little evidence we wanted any conversation which might challenge the status quo and managerial stances.

more...
John Michel's curator insight, April 13, 2014 10:44 PM

When leaders commit to involving the whole group, organizations are transformed. Although collaboration — or “laboring together” (collaborare in Latin) — isn’t easy, it becomes easier the more we welcome differences and even conflict in service of a larger whole. The results are higher trust, increased productivity and rich creativity.

David Hain's curator insight, April 30, 2014 2:44 AM

As a team leader, you need energy.  Get it by encouraging diverse views.  Don't keep punching the blancmanges!

Catherine Besse's curator insight, April 30, 2014 4:37 AM

Une approche intéressante du Leadership : encouragez la libre parole !

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Cool School Ideas
Scoop.it!

Empathy: A Top Skill of the Effective (and Loving) Educator

Empathy: A Top Skill of the Effective (and Loving) Educator | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Learning is a result of listening, which in turn leads to even better listening and attentiveness to the other person. In other words, to learn from the child, we must have empathy, and empathy gro...

Via Beth Dichter, Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The Kozol quotes are so incredibly true. Empathic teaching is about being present without being overbearing and intrusive.

more...
Beth Dichter's curator insight, April 28, 2014 10:38 PM

Have you considered how empathy may be an important component of your classroom? Should it be a "concern of educators"? Should it be "intentionally used as a primary instructional strategy?"

This post looks at these questions and provides a number of definitions for empathy as well as benefits of empathy in teaching and learning. There is also an excellent short animated video from RSA Shorts - The Power of Empathy.

Chris Carter's comment, April 29, 2014 8:24 PM
Thank you, Beth Dichter, for sharing!
Chris Carter's curator insight, April 29, 2014 8:24 PM

Affective is effective!

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from K-12 School Libraries
Scoop.it!

22 Things Educations Does That Will Embarrass Us In 25 Years

22 Things Educations Does That Will Embarrass Us In 25 Years | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
22 Things Educations Does That Will Embarrass Us In 25 Years by Terry Heick Saw a picture today from the 1970s of a mother driving her car with her newborn baby in the passenger seat...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Unless there are substantial cultural and political changes in schools, not education, some of these are so entrenched they may be too problematic to change easily. The separation of school and community is one that met with extreme resistance from the managers I worked for. At best, the 'transparency' is tokenism.

more...
Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, April 29, 2014 10:17 AM

When I read this article I thought about the last Mad Men episode I watched where Betty Draper calmly smokes cigarette after cigarette while on her son's school bus as a field trip chaperone. I think my favorites are #2 (I've said for years that students should progress when they master material and it should have nothing to do with age), #7 (all this testing does nothing but measure content acquisition and we claim to be invested in teaching students to think), and #16 (why have we almost completely done away with apprenticeship learning?). I think I'm going to print this one and put it in my portfolio so I can check it in 2025...