Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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What’s Your Relationship with Your Textbook?

What’s Your Relationship with Your Textbook? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I just read a couple of interesting studies exploring the relationship between the content in texts and the content covered by the teacher. The analysis was of introductory psychology courses and the conclusion not terribly surprising.

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Textbooks are tools that support teaching and learning. They are instruments which help in presenting curricula. Many teachers use the words textbooks and curricula as if they are the same thing. The result is adherence to the textbook as the if it were the curriculum. The metaphor, in the article, of the textbook and teacher as dance partners working together is a good one. The teacher's experience comes to the fore in this way.

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Should Principals Be Treated Like CEOs?

Should Principals Be Treated Like CEOs? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A new report argues that the way to attract and hold onto high quality school leaders is to give them more autonomy, administrative support, and a $100,000 raise.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I would be cautious with this thinking. My experience is many principals are managers and not leaders. Many of them had been out of the classroom for years. A new cohort appeared. These were teachers, and I use the word loosely, sprinted through the classroom in a few years and became managers.

 

A good point it made about raising pay is not the only prerequisite to leadership. Rather than thinking of principals as CEO's, what if we had smaller schools where community formed and classroom teachers were seen in a different light, as professionals. Research tells us schools with more than 500-700 students and teachers who have more than 80 students in a school year or term lead to compromises. We can tinker with the external pieces i.e. School managers, using consultants, standardizing how things are done, etc, but is that the real answer?

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Big Issues in Creativity: A Conversation with Drs. Puccio and Beghetto

Big Issues in Creativity:  A Conversation with Drs. Puccio and Beghetto | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A new generation of academic researchers is expanding the field of creativity, stepping into the shoes of giants like Alex Osborne and Sid Parnes. Two of today’s voices are Dr. Gerard Puccio and Dr.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Creativity is a process and more than ah-ha moments. That is a key takeaway from the article. Although creativity is about doing, it coincides with being.

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Treating ADHD with music

Treating ADHD with music | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Could learning music help children with attention disorders? New research suggests playing a musical instrument improves the ability to focus attention.

Via Suvi Salo, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It does. I am not a musician, but I love music. I listen to it and shared it with students frequently.

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How To Embrace Your Creative Rut And Climb Out ...

How To Embrace Your Creative Rut And Climb Out ... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The best way to get past your creative block may be to embrace it. It's not going to be easy, but it's possible, if you get out of your own way. Here...

Via bill woodruff
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Creativity is key in teaching and learning. Being in the classroom, was a creative process. The more outside control that is exerted on teachers the less creative they are.

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Canada's jobless youth: Think-tank pushes plan to create 186,000 'guaranteed' positions

Canada's jobless youth: Think-tank pushes plan to create 186,000 'guaranteed' positions | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
With youth unemployment well above the national average, exams might not be the only thing keeping young Canadians up at night. But one think-tank wants to ease the extracurricular stress students face by trying to guarantee availability of 186,000 jobs for those making the transition from backpack to briefcase.

 

Summary from Academica Top 10 25 June 2014

Canadian think-tank proposes “youth job guarantee”

Canadian think-tank the Broadbent Institute has a plan to create 186,000 “guaranteed” employment positions for Canada’s unemployed youth. The institute recently released a report that details this plan, essentially requiring investments by government and private businesses that will create 12-week-long, paid co-op, internship, and job placement positions in order to give young Canadians a boost into employment. “It’s time for the federal government and Canadian businesses to get serious about the youth jobs crisis and work together to tackle it,” said Rick Smith, Executive Director of the Broadbent Institute. “The employment situation of young people is worse today than before the recession, and that’s simply unacceptable.” At a pay rate of $15/hour, the institute asserts it is possible to decrease the number of unemployed youth by almost 50,000 at any given time. Smith says the private sector can use so-called “dead money”—money that is neither being invested or spent—to create jobs specifically for young workers, with the added bonus of growing the future labour force. CTV | Report


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A job crisis for young people suggests that this is not good moving forward.

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Educational change in Finland?

Educational change in Finland? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Now that I’m back after three weeks in Finland sponsored by the Fulbright Specialist Program, the Fulbright Center in Finland, and the University of Helsinki, a few other aspects of the Finnish edu...

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Change is also about the change process. Something that might not always stand out in change is there is structure. Structure is not always rigid and enforced. The structure described in this article moved from one that was centralized to one that was about the social connections within the particular school. Alberta's school reformers could learn something here.

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Suvi Salo's curator insight, June 25, 2014 12:39 PM

via Pasi Sahlberg (Twitter)

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7 ways to support summer learning--right now | eSchool News | eSchool News

7 ways to support summer learning--right now | eSchool News | eSchool News | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This infographic offers 7 easy tips to prevent summer learning loss, right away.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The key might be to integrate "learning" into regular activities. Parents who take children to museums, include children in everyday events, read with their children, etc. are more likely to see benefits. Those who send their children and create another list of expectations are less likely.

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Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read

Predicting Dyslexia — Even Before Children Learn to Read | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
New research shows it’s possible to pick up some of the signs of dyslexia in the brain even before kids learn to read. And this earlier identification may start to substantially influence how parents, educators and clinicians tackle the disorder.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We use science to support what we want and ignore it in teaching and learning. This would help many teachers and students work together so students can read and write effectively.

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Suvi Salo's curator insight, June 24, 2014 12:05 PM

"One of the key goals of early identification, Gabrieli says, is to help kids avoid the stigma of dyslexia."

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Malcolm Gladwell Defends Disputed '10,000 Hours' Rule

Malcolm Gladwell Defends Disputed '10,000 Hours' Rule | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Academic fight! Malcolm Gladwell's popular "10,000-hours rule" was debunked in a Sports Illustrated writer's new book, so Gladwell defended his theory by accusing the author of creating a "straw man."

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Good practice habits are important. Whether it is 10, 000 hours might be open to discussion, but event the most genetically endowed individuals practice what they do and that is what allows them to excel in their field. The key might be practicing what works. It clearly does not make sense to practice what does not work.

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Sharrock's curator insight, June 24, 2014 1:01 PM

from the article: "Gladwell defended his theory against Epstein's assertions in a piece in The New Yorker, arguing that Epstein did not actually debunk the 10,000-hour rule as he explained it. "Epstein has written a wonderful book. But I wonder if, in his zeal to stake out a provocative claim on this one matter, he has built himself a straw man." You see, Gladwell only applied the 10,000-hour rule to cognitively demanding activities that needed significant thought, unlike those runners and dart-throwers.

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Maker Education and Experiential Education

Maker Education and Experiential Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As those who follow me on Twitter and via this blog know, I am an advocate of the Maker Education movement.  The reason, as I've mentioned, is that I come from a background in Experiential Educatio...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students, particularly younger children, learn by doing something meaningful and relevant in the moment. This requires teaching which is more than coaching and calls on teaching as a creative enterprise.

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Employers Challenge to Educators: Make School Relevant to Students’ Lives

Employers Challenge to Educators: Make School Relevant to Students’ Lives | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Business leaders call on K-12 and higher education institutions to graduate students with the skills demanded by the marketplace.
[[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more!

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

John Dewey and Alfred North Whitehead argued that School has to be immediately relevant to students. Whitehead argued the teacher's genius was particularly important in students' learning. As well, far off goals i.e. aligning are adult goals not necessarily student goals.

 

Reimagining School is long overdue and is not a theoretical discussion external to Schools, but a one that blends theory and practice.

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The Miseducation of America

The Miseducation of America | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The film Ivory Tower reflects the sound bites, horror stories, and misinformation marring the debate about higher education.

Via Alfredo Calderón
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The title applies to other countries as well. Educational reform fails to grasp the black box concept that Schools represent which ends up as educational deform rather than transforming schools.

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@AubreyDaniels: When managing to results turns deadly | @SmartBrief

@AubreyDaniels: When managing to results turns deadly | @SmartBrief | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Managing by results is similar to driving in a big city by looking only in the rear view mirror: It doesn’t tell you what lies ahead.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We manage things and lead people. This article suggests something different. Change the word manage to lead and it makes sense at a certain level.

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Teaching Ahead: A Roundtable - Should Teachers Run Schools? Archives - Education Week Teacher

Teaching Ahead: A Roundtable - Should Teachers Run Schools? Archives - Education Week Teacher | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I worked in one and it was wonderful until the bureaucrats and technocrats stepped in. Many School managers and teachers are afraid of deep systemic and structural change which is necessary. It is not about new labels. It is about transforming school in ways which meet the needs of students and that can only be done with different models which allow creativity to flourish amongst teachers.

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Creativity and education

Creativity and education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A regular criticism leveled at education is the function (and sometimes the lack of) creativity in motivating and inspiring learning.  Creativity these days is seen as something 'special' and worth...

Via Skip Zalneraitis, Suvi Salo, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Ken Robinson has cited research that creativity is on the decline after kindergarten. Teaching is relational and it is about creating space where teachers and students share in the creative process.

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This Is Your Brain on Writing

This Is Your Brain on Writing | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
For the first time, researchers have used fMRI scanners to track the brain activity of writers as they created fiction. The results have drawn strong reactions from other scientists.

Via Dorian Love, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an area of neuroscience School managers and those outside the classroom have to be aware of. Rushing to eliminate cursive writing and declaring it dead is premature.

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Leadership By Virtue: Teaching coupled with Leadership

Leadership By Virtue: Teaching coupled with Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If your actions inspire others to dream more, learn more, do more and become more, you are a leader.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers are leaders. It is not a default position or one that is given to them. It exists in the very words education and pedagogy which mean leading children.

 

The default position has become one where teaching is not leading. It is about managing.

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Joe Boutte's curator insight, July 22, 2014 5:49 AM

Besides parents and family, teachers are the first leaders we deal with in our lives.  They inspire us, mold us, influence us, and lead us to discovery, learning, and dealing with the world around us.  Teachers are the epitome of leadership across the globe.

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Disagreements

Disagreements | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Source for alternate phrasing: http://english.stackexchange.com/questions/160556/alternative-to-well-just-have-to-agree-to-disagree


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Disagreement is inevitable. What we do with disagreement is the important ingredient.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, June 25, 2014 12:28 PM

Yes, and that is okay! Disagreements are inevitable. At the risk of damaging relationships, there are alternate phrases that may be used. I love the site referenced above. Find ways to end discussions politely and move on. ~ V.B.

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Losing Your Creativity

Losing Your Creativity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Creativity emerges from asking questions, from inquiring why certain procedures are followed, how things work or why they do not, and in general the "why" can’t it happen. I remember decades ago wh...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The opening Pablo Picasso quote is consistent with Ken Robinson's comments that creative thinking declines after kindergarten.

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Taming the mammoth: Stop caring what other people think

Taming the mammoth: Stop caring what other people think | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Part 2: Taming the Mammoth
 
Some people are born with a reasonably tame mammoth or raised with parenting that helps keep the mammoth in check. Others die without ever reining their mammoth in at all, spending their whole lives at its whim. Most of us are somewhere in the middle—we’ve got control of our mammoth in certain areas of our lives while it wreaks havoc in others. Being run by your mammoth doesn’t make you a bad or weak person—it just means you haven’t yet figured out how to get a grip on it. You might not even be aware that you have a mammoth at all or of the extent to which your Authentic Voice has been silenced.

Whatever your situation, there are three steps to getting your mammoth under your control:

Step 1: Examine Yourself

The first step to improving things is a clear and honest assessment of what’s going on in your head, and there are three parts of this:

1) Get to know your Authentic Voice

This doesn’t sound that hard, but it is. It takes some serious reflection to sift through the webs of other people’s thoughts and opinions and figure out who the real you actually is. You spend time with a lot of people—which of them do you actually like the most? How do you spend your leisure time, and do you truly enjoy all parts of it? Is there anything you regularly spend money on that you don’t feel that comfortable with? How does your gut really feel about your job and relationship status? What’s your true political opinion? Do you even care? Do you pretend to care about things you don’t just to have an opinion? Do you secretly have an opinion on a political or moral issue you don’t ever voice because people you know will be outraged?

There are cliché phrases for this process—”soul-searching” or “finding yourself”—but that’s exactly what needs to happen. Maybe you can reflect on this from whatever chair you’re sitting in right now or from some other part of your normal life—or maybe you need to go somewhere far away, by yourself, and step out of your life in order to effectively examine it. Either way, you’ve got to figure out what actually matters to you and start being proud of whoever your Authentic Voice is.

2) Figure out where the mammoth is hiding
 
Most of the time a mammoth is in control of a person, the person’s not really aware of it. But you can’t make progress if you’re not crystal clear about where the biggest problem areas are.

The most obvious way to find the mammoth is to figure out where your fear is—where are you most susceptible to shame or embarrassment? What parts of your life do you think about and a dreadful, sinking feeling washes over you? Where does the prospect of failure seem like a nightmare? What are you too timid to publicly try even though you know you’re good at it? If you were giving advice to yourself, which parts of your life would clearly need a change that you’re avoiding acting on right now?

The second place a mammoth hides is in the way-too-good feelings you get from feeling accepted or on a pedestal over other people. Are you a serious pleaser at work or in your relationship? Are you terrified of disappointing your parents and do you choose making them proud over aiming to gratify yourself? Do you get too excited about being associated with prestigious things or care too much about status? Do you brag more than you should?

A third area the mammoth is present is anywhere you don’t feel comfortable making a decision without “permission” or approval from others. Do you have opinions you’re regurgitating from someone else’s mouth, which you’re comfortable having now that you know that person has them? When you introduce your new girlfriend or boyfriend to your friends or family for the first time, can those people’s reaction to your new person fundamentally change your feelings for him/her? Is there a Puppet Master in your life? If so, who, and why?

3) Decide where the mammoth needs to be ousted
 
It’s not realistic to kick the mammoth entirely out of your head—you’re a human and humans have mammoths in their head, period. The thing we all need to do is carve out certain sacred areas of our lives that must be in the hands of the AV and free of mammoth influence. There are obvious areas that need to be made part of the AV’s domain like your choice of life partner, your career path, and the way you raise your kids. Others are personal—it comes down to the question, “In which parts of your life must you be entirely true to yourself?”

Step 2: Gather Courage by Internalizing that the Mammoth Has a Low IQ

Real Woolly Mammoths were unimpressive enough to go extinct, and Social Survival Mammoths aren’t any better. Despite the fact that they haunt us so, our mammoths are dumb, primitive creatures who have no understanding of the modern world. Deeply understanding this—and internalizing it—is a key step to taming yours. There are two major reasons not to take your mammoth seriously:

1) The mammoth’s fears are totally irrational.

5 things the Mammoth is incorrect about:

→ Everyone is talking about me and my life and just think how much everyone will be talking about it if I do this risky or weird thing.

Here’s how things actually are:

No one really cares that much about what you’re doing. People are highly self-absorbed.

→ If I try really hard, I can please everyone.

Yes, maybe in a 40-person tribe with a unified culture. But in today’s world, no matter who you are, a bunch of people will like you and a bunch of other people won’t. Being approved of by one type of person means turning another off. So obsessing over fitting in with any one group is illogical, especially if that group isn’t really who you are. You’ll do all that work, and meanwhile, your actual favorite people are off being friends with each other somewhere else.

→ Being disapproved of or looked down upon or shit-talked about has real consequences in my life.

Anyone who disapproves of who you’re being or what you’re doing isn’t even in the same room with you 99.7% of the time. It’s a classic mammoth mistake to fabricate a vision of future social consequences that is way worse than what actually ends up happening—which is usually nothing at all.

→ Really judgy people matter.

Here’s how judgy people function: They’re highly mammoth-controlled and become good friends with and date other judgy people who are also highly mammoth-controlled. One of the primary activities they do together is talk shit about whoever’s not with them—maybe they feel some jealousy, and eye-rolling disapproval helps them flip the script and feel less jealous, or maybe they’re not jealous and use someone as a vehicle for bathing in schadenfreude—but whatever the underlying feeling, the judging serves to feed their hungry mammoth.
 
When people shit-talk, they set up a category division of which they’re always on the right side. They do this to prop themselves up on a pedestal that their mammoth can chomp away on.

Being the material a judgy person uses to feel good about themselves is a fairly infuriating thought—but it has no actual consequences and it’s clearly all much more about the judgy person and their mammoth problem than it is about you. If you find yourself making decisions partially based on not being talked badly about by a judgy person, think hard about what’s actually going on and stop.

→ I’m a bad person if I disappoint or offend the person/people who love me and have invested so much in me.

No. You’re not a bad person for being whoever your Authentic Voice is in your one life. This is one of those simple things—if they truly selflessly love you, they will for sure come around and accept everything once they see that you’re happy. If you’re happy and they still don’t come around, here’s what’s happening: their strong feelings about who you should be or what you should do are their mammoth talking, and their main motivation is worrying about how it’ll “look” to other people who know them. They’re allowing their mammoth to override their love for you, and they should be adamantly ignored.

Two other reasons why the mammoth’s fearful obsession with social approval makes no sense:

A) You live here:
 
So who gives a fuck about anything?

B) You and everyone you know are going to die. Kind of soon.
 
So like…

The mammoth’s fears being irrational is one reason the mammoth has a low IQ. Here’s the second:

2) The mammoth’s efforts are counterproductive.

The irony of the whole thing is that the obsessive lumbering mammoth isn’t even good at his job. His methods of winning approval may have been effective in simpler times, but today, they’re transparent and off-putting. The modern world is an AV’s world, and if the mammoth wants to thrive socially, he should do the thing that scares him most—let the AV take over.

Here’s why:

AVs are interesting. Mammoths are boring. Every AV is unique and complex, which is inherently interesting. Mammoths are all the same—they copy and conform, and their motives aren’t based on anything authentic or real, just on doing what they think they’re supposed to do. That’s supremely boring.

AVs lead. Mammoths follow. Leadership is natural for most AVs, because they draw their thoughts and opinions from an original place, which gives them an original angle. And if they’re smart and innovative enough, they can change things in the world and invent things that disrupt the status quo. If you give someone a paintbrush and an empty canvas, they might not paint something good—but they’ll change the canvas in one way or another.

Mammoths, on the other hand, follow—by definition. That’s what they were built to do—blend in and follow the leader. The last thing a mammoth is going to do is change the status quo because it’s trying so hard to be the status quo. When you give someone a paintbrush and canvas, but the paint is the same exact color as the canvas, they can paint all they want, but they won’t change anything.

People gravitate toward AVs, not mammoths. The only time a mammoth-crazed person is appealing on a first date is when they’re on the date with another mammoth-crazed person. People with a strong AV see through mammoth-controlled people and aren’t attracted to them. A friend of mine was dating a great on-paper guy a while back but broke things off because she couldn’t quite fall for him. She tried to articulate why, saying he wasn’t weird or special enough—he seemed like “just one of the guys.” In other words, he was being run too much by a mammoth.

This also holds among friends or colleagues, where AV-run people are more respected and more magnetic—not because there’s necessarily anything extraordinary about them, but because people respect someone with the strength of character to have tamed their mammoth.
 
Step 3: Start Being Yourself

This post was all fun and games until “start being yourself” came into the picture. Up to now, this has been an interesting reflection into why humans care so much what other people think, why that’s bad, how it’s a problem in your life, and why there’s no good reason it should continue to plague you. But actually doing something after you finish reading this article is a whole different thing. That takes more than reflection—it takes some courage.
 
But courage against what, exactly? As we’ve discussed, there’s no actual danger involved in being yourself—more than anything, it just takes an Emperor Has No Clothes epiphany, which is as simple as this:

Almost nothing you’re socially scared of is actually scary.

Absorbing this thought will diminish the fear that you feel, and without fear, the mammoth loses some power.

With a weakened mammoth, it becomes possible to begin standing up for who you are and even making some bold changes—and when you watch those changes turn out well for you with few negative consequences and no regrets, it reinforces the epiphany and an empowered AV becomes a habit. Your mammoth has now lost its ability to pull the strings, and it’s tamed.
 
The mammoth is still with you—it’ll always be with you—but you’ll have an easier time ignoring or overruling it when it speaks up or acts out, because the AV is the alpha dog now. You can start to relish the feeling of being viewed as weird or inappropriate or confusing to people, and society becomes your playground and blank canvas, not something to grovel before and hope for acceptance from.

Making this shift isn’t easy for anyone, but it’s worth obsessing over. Your Authentic Voice has been given one life—and it’s your job to make sure it gets the opportunity to live it.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This would be helpful in classrooms.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, June 24, 2014 11:23 AM

Good post on finding your true self and living your own life free from your "mammoth." Click on the link or image above to view the original post with lots of cute pics. ~ V. B.

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More Questions for the Upholders, Questioners, Rebels, and Obligers Out There

More Questions for the Upholders, Questioners, Rebels, and Obligers Out There | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“I loved knowing what made my employer happy. I know that sounds weird, but making him happy made me happy.”—Dawn Carmichael

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is more likely we need some of each than one being superior to the other. I think of myself as a questioner and rebel and am comfortable with that. I know those who want to protect the status quo are less comfortable. It is why I left School.

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A teacher’s plea to bosses: Give us ‘time and autonomy to create solutions’

A teacher’s plea to bosses: Give us ‘time and autonomy to create solutions’ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ask a teacher about his/her job, and you will hear about the lack of planning and collaboration time. Here's why it is so important.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I do not like words like teacherpreneur and the like. It suggests education is about a business model which is an underlying issue amongst many. Teachers have accepted their fate in many cases. I know I did. I sought out PD and took time to go do it. It is was time away from my family which was never rewarded by my bosses who claimed to be teachers as well, although most of them had not been in a classroom for years and more recently they had sprinted through the classroom to get to some fantasy job as an administrator.

 

We need to stop thinking about School and education as businesses. Starting there, will promote a different mindset and focus us on what we are teaching for, the students and their learning.

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Yuri Kochiyama and How Everyone Plays Their Part

Yuri Kochiyama and How Everyone Plays Their Part | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Compassion and inclusion in our schools begin when we keep both ears open, allow diversity of thought and experience, and recognize that voice is agency.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Diversity of thought and experience is critical in life and schools.

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What Are the Most Common Mistakes New Managers Make?

What Are the Most Common Mistakes New Managers Make? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Amazon General Manager Ian McAllister answers the question: What are some mistakes that new/inexperienced managers make? via Quora.

Via Thomas Faltin
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Several of these points are sustained as a way of managing. For example, not getting to know people was problematic and, I believe encouraged, in School.

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