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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Principal reclassified students as ‘English Language Learners’ so they would have more time on state test - EAGnews.org powered by Education Action Group Foundation, Inc.

Principal reclassified students as ‘English Language Learners’ so they would have more time on state test - EAGnews.org powered by Education Action Group Foundation, Inc. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Education Research, Reporting, Analysis and Commentary powered by Education Action Group Foundation
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Standardized, high stakes testing is wrong. I always told parents they had a choice for their children to opt out. More parents should.

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4 Things I Do That Make Me A Bad Manager

4 Things I Do That Make Me A Bad Manager | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Anyone who has been a leader of people; whether a manager or a president, has at some point not done it particularly well.I subscribe to the "3 Kinds of Bad Manager" scenario.Bad Manager 1 has no

Via Stepped Leader
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The challenge with lists is they fall short. This one should have included listening and taking time to build relationships.

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The Right Thing: Making peace with lies is bad business

The Right Thing: Making peace with lies is bad business | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Dishonesty is not just a bad policy and bad for business; it is bad personal practice. I sat in a meeting with a School manager who insisted we would hit it out of the ball park in building our little school. He repeated this phrase enough that the next day when he announced his new appointment I was not surprised. Dishonesty corrodes relationships.

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HR_Hardball's curator insight, June 29, 2014 12:37 PM

Lies breed faster than rabbits

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Rethinking Public Education
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The Desperate Need For Self-Criticism in Education

The Desperate Need For Self-Criticism in Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The Desperate Need For Self-Criticism in Education


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Healthy skepticism begins with oneself. Taking time and reflecting on the work we do is essential to healthy growth. Karen Barad uses the word diffract and Emmanuel Levinas the word refract instead of reflection to avoid the settling and groupthink that prevails for various reasons in School.

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From WaPo, on teacher demographics

From WaPo, on teacher demographics | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A student laments in a blog for the Washington Post that his "school district hires too many white teachers." My PhD dissertation was specifically on the lack of men in education, especially at the...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teacher demographics is far more complex than a single aspect i.e. gender although that is at the forefront. Other aspects include more education grads using their degree in other fields, about 1/2 (50%) of new teachers leave the profession within 7 years, the use of part-time contracts to control costs in a relationship driven profession, government attempts to union bust, the sprinting through the classroom of many consultants, School managers, and reformers, etc.

 

In varying amounts, these all seem to be at the core of shifting demographics in the profession and I did not even talk about the role digital technologies are playing.

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How To Use Bloom’s Taxonomy To Write Learning Outcomes

How To Use Bloom’s Taxonomy To Write Learning Outcomes | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“By: Scott Davis Business Analyst, Pearson It is often quite difficult to relate inputs to outcomes in the world of education. Traditionally, much work has been done to develop and provide inputs into the process of education.”


Via L. García Aretio, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first paragraph points out the challenges we have when we use learning outcomes as measures. Outcomes serve as inputs and outputs which easily fall into instrumental categories which can be managed. These are necessary, but the ultimate keys are context and relationships which are creating learning spaces where each student explores their learning fully. This suggests teaching remains fundamental.

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8 Characteristics of Great School Leaders ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

8 Characteristics of Great School Leaders ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

8 Characteristics of Great School Leaders ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning http://t.co/v7Epsm85uy #digilead #leadership #r10df


Via Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting that in a day and age where it would seem incumbent on moving away from the superman model of leadership this thinking reinforces it. Leaders assume a role which is nominal. Leading is a way of being which is a verb. There is quite a difference.

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Schools have got it wrong. This is what's right.

Schools have got it wrong.  This is what's right. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
  You may have seen the TED talk by Sir Ken Robinson, the one where he says schools kill creativity.  I agree with him.  His talk is sensible.  It's easy to agree with him.  But he doesn't go far e...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Schools do have it wrong. Worse yet the people running School have it wrong and persist. I agree students want to be active. I don't think this begins at middle school or junior high. Students from the moment they enter school are learning compliance and conformity, sit still, be quiet, and do not disagree. Teachers are also caught in the same bind.

 

I am not sure I agree with the economic implications of apprenticeships the article suggests, but a key word I noted was "diversity" in those apprenticeships. Students need opportunities to experiment and learn what the many possible avenues are that exist.

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Finding Treasure In A Crappy Jar of Clay

Finding Treasure In A Crappy Jar of Clay | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

A

Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A short and to the point article which focuses on a remarkable life being one which is open and inviting. Authenticity brings us in touch with who we are and the universe we live. It is important to find work that brings out the best in who we are, others we live in relationship with, and the world.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Learning, Learning Technologies & Infographics - Interest Piques
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Learning Strategies

Effective study strategiesHow to get good marksLearning from lecturesGetting supportEffective study strategiesAttitudes to learning

Most people, when asked, can recount an experience that undermined their confidence in their own learning. Negative comments when we are young can have a very long-term effect upon our view of ourselves as bright, capable learners. However, self-confidence has a major impact upon our ability to perform well.

What kind of message were you given about your abilities to study when you were at school or college?

Are these messages helpful to you now?

What attitudes would be most useful to you succeeding at your studies now?

 

Optimum conditions for learning

We can improve the conditions for learning by being aware of some of the ways the brain works. Although we do not need to know a great deal about the brain, understanding some basics can help us to make the most of our minds. Some of the optimal conditions for learning are common sense and good for our general health. For example, the brain works well when:

it is rested - sleep affects our performance

it is hydrated - drinking water helps the electrical connections of the brain

it is unstressed - when it is stressed, it can focus only on 'escape', not on such matters as reading journals and writing assignments

it enjoys itself - it is important to look for any angle that can stimulate our interest in what we are learning. Sometimes this can take imagination if the subject itself seems boring

it has seen something several times - little and often works better than trying to understand something in one sitting.

For further information please see Chapters 2, 3 and 4 of The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell.

General tips

Spending long hours studying is not necessarily productive. It is possible to gain better marks by studying more effectively rather than for longer. Most of this resource looks at ways of studying in more effective ways. To study effectively, you can:

Identify what is really needed

Study assignment titles carefully. Work out exactly what is required for assignments. This saves time in re-writing assignments later. Time spent in preparation is well spent.

Work strategically

Set yourself clear goals and work towards these.

Make the material meaningful

Looking for 'the meaning' or how things work, rather than focusing on remembering information. Work with the material, looking at how it fits together and applies to different circumstances. If you develop your understanding of the subject, it will help you to take in future material more easily. This makes reading easier. It also improves your memory for the subject.

Look for links

Be active in searching out links between different aspects of the programme. Look also for links between what you are learning and the wider world. This helps to develop understanding and memory.

Work with others

Work with other students so that you share ideas and gain mutual support. You may be able to share some research tasks and clarify your lecture notes. Studying with others makes study more interesting, as you gain a different set of perspectives.

Set yourself SMART-F targets

Targets should be:

strategic: they assist you to achieve your goals

measurable: you can tell when you have completed them

achievable: you are likely to succeed in meeting them

realistic: they fit the circumstances

time-bound: you have a set time to meet

flexible: you can adapt them if the circumstances change.

Look for shortcuts

Look for reasonable short-cuts that do not compromise your studies. For example:

avoid unnecessary tasks such as writing notes out neatly

use abbreviations in your notes

write assignments onto a computer if possible rather than writing them out by hand and then typing them up

focus your notes around themes and questions rather than making long notes that you do not really need.

Use the word limit to focus your energies

Most assignments have a word limit. Use this as a guide to how much you need to read and how many examples you can include. Plan out in advance how you will divide up the words available to you. Often, you need to be very concise about each topic. This means you may not be able to include very much of what you have read if you have undertaken a great deal of reading or made very extensive notes.

Take care of yourself

Take rests when you are tired. Study takes longer and the brain is less effective when you are tired or stressed. Plan your time so that you get breaks. A change of scene stimulates the brain and helps creative thinking.

For more advice, see time management and organisational skills, and for further information please see Chapter 5 of The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell.

TopHow to get good marks

There is no magical formula for getting good marks. Each lecturer will look for different things, depending on the subject and the nature of the assignment. However, there are steps you can take to increase your chances of good marks.

Read assignment titles very carefully

These usually contain a question that the assignment must address. You will only get marks for answering that question. Other information just uses up your limited word allowance.

Find out the conventions

Each subject works to a set of conventions or 'rules'. These will apply to such matters as the methodology to use, what counts as 'evidence' and the style of writing to use. Spend time finding out what these are. Guidance may be given in the programme handbook or web pages. Otherwise, look at the language and style used in books you are recommended. You will have a clearer idea of what is expected if you look at material from a different subject and see the contrast. Some subjects prefer creative or subjective approaches; others prefer objective and logical thinking; some require both.

Structure your writing

Make sure that you follow the basic conventions for writing reports, essays or case studies. Ensure that readers can follow a clear line of reasoning and can see how every example and piece of information contributes to that line of reasoning.

For more advice, see writing skills and essay writing.

Give evidence and a few good examples

Avoid opinions and feelings unless these are backed up with evidence available from sources open to others (books, journals, internet, etc.). Choose good examples that illustrate the point rather than loading the reader with too much detail or too many examples.

Reference your work

Make references to source materials (books, journals, paintings, web-pages, etc) within your own work. Write a list of all references at the end of the work, following the conventions required by your programme.

For more advice, see referencing and plagiarism and the free audio download on plagiarism.

Proof-read

Proof your work for typing errors. Read it aloud to check that it makes sense. Listen carefully as you read it aloud. Check that the computer hasn't accidentally swallowed half of a sentence or some paragraphs you though were there.

Using feedback

Feedback is your main form of support from tutors. It is your best guide about what to do to improve your marks and your work more generally.

In the short termRead all feedback carefully. Avoid the temptation to throw it away if your mark was bad or if you have finished the topic.Put the feedback away for a day or two and then go through it again.Make sense of what is said. Work out why your tutors gave you the feedback they did. If you really don’t understand it, make an appointment to discuss it.Make a list of all the good points. It is easy to miss this. People tend to focus in on the areas for improvement and negative comments and overlook the positive feedback.Identify one or two main areas for improvement. Select items that will have the most impact on your marks, or which you feel strongest about.Make a clear plan for how you will make use of feedback.In the longer termKeep your feedback in one folder.When you have several pieces of feedback, read through them and jot down a list of the main points that are made on each.Look out for recurring themes. These are things which are either gaining or losing you marks regularly.Make sure you recognise your strengths so that you do not lose these.Identify one or two areas for improvement. If you do not know how to address these on your own or with a study skills book, speak to your tutor or to student support staff.

For more advice, see handy tips for assessments and for further information please see Chapters 5 and 8 of The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell.

TopLearning from lecturesThe purpose of lectures

Lectures are an opportunity to find out how one lecturer makes sense of the wealth of information and research that has been undertaken on a topic. A good lecturer will use the lecture to give you an overview of the main themes, develop your understanding of the issues, guide you on how to find out more about the subject and the reading you need to undertake. You may also gain details of relevant current issues, explanations of complex material or questions to answer that develop your own thinking and research. The aim is not usually to give you a definitive and comprehensive set of 'facts' on the subject. You are expected to supplement the lecture with reading and interpretations of your own.

Lectures that develop understanding

The finer details of the subject should be available in lecture hand-outs, web-pages or in the recommended reading. This should mean that you do not have to spend the time in the lecture making detailed notes. If you have lecturers like this, your best strategy is:

focus on listening to the lecturenote how the different themes or issues interconnect, so you gain a good overall grasp of the subjectmake a brief note of key themesnote any additional referencesread about the subject of the lecture before and after in order to pick up details. Information-rich lectures

Some lecturers will use the lecture to bombard you with information and expect you to take this in at speed. If so, most people will find it difficult to listen and take detailed notes, and it is unlikely that anybody will have a complete set of lecture notes. If you have lecturers like this, your best strategy is:

Browse through relevant text books before the lecture. This will give you an idea of what information is in the books - and which you may not need to note in the lecture. You can come back to this after the lecture.It is hard to make sense of lectures where information content is high. Reading something about the subject in advance will help to make more sense of what is said.Listen carefully for topic headings and references so that you can chase missing information after the lecture.Resist the temptation to write everything down if you can avoid this. It is very hard to catch a complete set of lecture notes.Form a group and go through the lecture notes so you can fill in gaps. Between you, you will have most of the information you need and discussing the notes will help you to understand the subject.Top tips for learning from lecturesBefore the lectureprepare for lectures - find out what is in the books on the subject so that you are aware of what you do not need to note in the lectureform an opinion about the subject of the lectureset yourself questions and leave spaces to have these answered during the lecture.During the lecturelisten to 'make sense' rather than to make noteslisten for 'signposts' about what is coming next or for summaries of key pointslisten for answers to questions you set in advancewrite yourself questions so you can trace answers and information after the lecturemake brief notes of essential points.After the lectureread your notes and fill in any gapsdiscuss the lecture with other peopleconsider how the lecture changed or developed your opinions of the subjectlabel and file your notes.TopGetting supportLevels of support

The amount of support available from teaching staff will vary a great deal. Usually this is much less than people are used to from school or college. There may be more help available where programme numbers are small or where the work is based mostly in a studio or laboratory. However, in general, you are expected to take the lead in:

identifying what you needlooking for ways of solving problemsfinding out what information and support is availablemaking use of available support.Using support from lecturers and teaching staff

Lecturers provide information and guidance in Handbooks, in their feedback on your assignments and in handouts. They expect you to consult this before coming to ask for additional help.

Lecturers may not work full time at the university. Some of these lecturers will not be available to give extra help, as they may work at other jobs when they are not teaching you.

Other lecturers will have only a small amount of time to offer to any one student. They will not be able to go through your work with you in the detail you may have received at college. In order to make best use of the short time they can offer you:

work through the difficulty as far as you can rather than expecting help at different stagesidentify possible solutions and try these before seeing the tutorwrite a list of key questions to askput these in order, with the most important first, in case you run out of time and do not get through the listtake your proposed solutions with you so that it is clear to the lecturer what you are trying to dostick to the point when you see the tutorbe on time: if you are late, you will have less time with the tutortutors cannot usually run over the time allocated to you.Support services

Universities offer a range of support services. Find out what is available and make use of these if you need them. It is better to ask for help early on if you are experiencing difficulty. It is more difficult to find a good solution if you let a difficulty run on without seeking help. Most services are confidential. The Student Union usually has support or welfare officers that can offer advice.

Set up your own support networks

It is expected that students will develop their own support networks. There are innumerable ways of doing this. For example, you could set up:

Support groups - these may focus on study, or bring together students from particular backgrounds such as mature students, students with disabilities, students from different ethnic backgrounds, international students, students living in a particular region on distance learning programmes, etc.Discussion groups to debate themes and issues that arise in relation to the subject.Reading groups to discuss themes that arise from subject texts.Action sets to offer mutual guidance on short term action plans.Lecture groups - these go through lecture notes to discuss themes and identify gaps in notes.

This content has been written by Stella Cottrell, author of The Study Skills Handbook. 

Top

 

In this section

Essential skills for studyLearning strategiesReading and research strategiesPersonal effectiveness and independent study

 


Via Charles Tiayon, bill woodruff
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are good points and many links embedded.

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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, June 26, 2014 10:18 PM
Effective study strategiesAttitudes to learning

Most people, when asked, can recount an experience that undermined their confidence in their own learning. Negative comments when we are young can have a very long-term effect upon our view of ourselves as bright, capable learners. However, self-confidence has a major impact upon our ability to perform well.

What kind of message were you given about your abilities to study when you were at school or college?

Are these messages helpful to you now?

What attitudes would be most useful to you succeeding at your studies now?


Optimum conditions for learning

We can improve the conditions for learning by being aware of some of the ways the brain works. Although we do not need to know a great deal about the brain, understanding some basics can help us to make the most of our minds. Some of the optimal conditions for learning are common sense and good for our general health. For example, the brain works well when:

  • it is rested - sleep affects our performance

  • it is hydrated - drinking water helps the electrical connections of the brain

  • it is unstressed - when it is stressed, it can focus only on 'escape', not on such matters as reading journals and writing assignments

  • it enjoys itself - it is important to look for any angle that can stimulate our interest in what we are learning. Sometimes this can take imagination if the subject itself seems boring

  • it has seen something several times - little and often works better than trying to understand something in one sitting.

For further information please see Chapters 2, 3 and 4 of The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell.

General tips

Spending long hours studying is not necessarily productive. It is possible to gain better marks by studying more effectively rather than for longer. Most of this resource looks at ways of studying in more effective ways. To study effectively, you can:

Identify what is really needed

Study assignment titles carefully. Work out exactly what is required for assignments. This saves time in re-writing assignments later. Time spent in preparation is well spent.

Work strategically

Set yourself clear goals and work towards these.

Make the material meaningful

Looking for 'the meaning' or how things work, rather than focusing on remembering information. Work with the material, looking at how it fits together and applies to different circumstances. If you develop your understanding of the subject, it will help you to take in future material more easily. This makes reading easier. It also improves your memory for the subject.

Look for links

Be active in searching out links between different aspects of the programme. Look also for links between what you are learning and the wider world. This helps to develop understanding and memory.

Work with others

Work with other students so that you share ideas and gain mutual support. You may be able to share some research tasks and clarify your lecture notes. Studying with others makes study more interesting, as you gain a different set of perspectives.

Set yourself SMART-F targets

Targets should be:

  • strategic: they assist you to achieve your goals

  • measurable: you can tell when you have completed them

  • achievable: you are likely to succeed in meeting them

  • realistic: they fit the circumstances

  • time-bound: you have a set time to meet

  • flexible: you can adapt them if the circumstances change.

Look for shortcuts

Look for reasonable short-cuts that do not compromise your studies. For example:

  • avoid unnecessary tasks such as writing notes out neatly

  • use abbreviations in your notes

  • write assignments onto a computer if possible rather than writing them out by hand and then typing them up

  • focus your notes around themes and questions rather than making long notes that you do not really need.

Use the word limit to focus your energies

Most assignments have a word limit. Use this as a guide to how much you need to read and how many examples you can include. Plan out in advance how you will divide up the words available to you. Often, you need to be very concise about each topic. This means you may not be able to include very much of what you have read if you have undertaken a great deal of reading or made very extensive notes.

Take care of yourself

Take rests when you are tired. Study takes longer and the brain is less effective when you are tired or stressed. Plan your time so that you get breaks. A change of scene stimulates the brain and helps creative thinking.

For more advice, see time management and organisational skills, and for further information please see Chapter 5 of The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell.

TopHow to get good marks

There is no magical formula for getting good marks. Each lecturer will look for different things, depending on the subject and the nature of the assignment. However, there are steps you can take to increase your chances of good marks.

Read assignment titles very carefully

These usually contain a question that the assignment must address. You will only get marks for answering that question. Other information just uses up your limited word allowance.

Find out the conventions

Each subject works to a set of conventions or 'rules'. These will apply to such matters as the methodology to use, what counts as 'evidence' and the style of writing to use. Spend time finding out what these are. Guidance may be given in the programme handbook or web pages. Otherwise, look at the language and style used in books you are recommended. You will have a clearer idea of what is expected if you look at material from a different subject and see the contrast. Some subjects prefer creative or subjective approaches; others prefer objective and logical thinking; some require both.

Structure your writing

Make sure that you follow the basic conventions for writing reports, essays or case studies. Ensure that readers can follow a clear line of reasoning and can see how every example and piece of information contributes to that line of reasoning.

For more advice, see writing skills and essay writing.

Give evidence and a few good examples

Avoid opinions and feelings unless these are backed up with evidence available from sources open to others (books, journals, internet, etc.). Choose good examples that illustrate the point rather than loading the reader with too much detail or too many examples.

Reference your work

Make references to source materials (books, journals, paintings, web-pages, etc) within your own work. Write a list of all references at the end of the work, following the conventions required by your programme.

For more advice, see referencing and plagiarism and the free audio download on plagiarism.

Proof-read

Proof your work for typing errors. Read it aloud to check that it makes sense. Listen carefully as you read it aloud. Check that the computer hasn't accidentally swallowed half of a sentence or some paragraphs you though were there.

Using feedback

Feedback is your main form of support from tutors. It is your best guide about what to do to improve your marks and your work more generally.

In the short term
  • Read all feedback carefully. Avoid the temptation to throw it away if your mark was bad or if you have finished the topic.
  • Put the feedback away for a day or two and then go through it again.
  • Make sense of what is said. Work out why your tutors gave you the feedback they did. If you really don’t understand it, make an appointment to discuss it.
  • Make a list of all the good points. It is easy to miss this. People tend to focus in on the areas for improvement and negative comments and overlook the positive feedback.
  • Identify one or two main areas for improvement. Select items that will have the most impact on your marks, or which you feel strongest about.
  • Make a clear plan for how you will make use of feedback.
In the longer term
  • Keep your feedback in one folder.
  • When you have several pieces of feedback, read through them and jot down a list of the main points that are made on each.
  • Look out for recurring themes. These are things which are either gaining or losing you marks regularly.
  • Make sure you recognise your strengths so that you do not lose these.
  • Identify one or two areas for improvement. If you do not know how to address these on your own or with a study skills book, speak to your tutor or to student support staff.

For more advice, see handy tips for assessments and for further information please see Chapters 5 and 8 of The Study Skills Handbook by Stella Cottrell.

TopLearning from lecturesThe purpose of lectures

Lectures are an opportunity to find out how one lecturer makes sense of the wealth of information and research that has been undertaken on a topic. A good lecturer will use the lecture to give you an overview of the main themes, develop your understanding of the issues, guide you on how to find out more about the subject and the reading you need to undertake. You may also gain details of relevant current issues, explanations of complex material or questions to answer that develop your own thinking and research. The aim is not usually to give you a definitive and comprehensive set of 'facts' on the subject. You are expected to supplement the lecture with reading and interpretations of your own.

Lectures that develop understanding

The finer details of the subject should be available in lecture hand-outs, web-pages or in the recommended reading. This should mean that you do not have to spend the time in the lecture making detailed notes. If you have lecturers like this, your best strategy is:

  • focus on listening to the lecture
  • note how the different themes or issues interconnect, so you gain a good overall grasp of the subject
  • make a brief note of key themes
  • note any additional references
  • read about the subject of the lecture before and after in order to pick up details. 
Information-rich lectures

Some lecturers will use the lecture to bombard you with information and expect you to take this in at speed. If so, most people will find it difficult to listen and take detailed notes, and it is unlikely that anybody will have a complete set of lecture notes. If you have lecturers like this, your best strategy is:

  1. Browse through relevant text books before the lecture. This will give you an idea of what information is in the books - and which you may not need to note in the lecture. You can come back to this after the lecture.
  2. It is hard to make sense of lectures where information content is high. Reading something about the subject in advance will help to make more sense of what is said.
  3. Listen carefully for topic headings and references so that you can chase missing information after the lecture.
  4. Resist the temptation to write everything down if you can avoid this. It is very hard to catch a complete set of lecture notes.
  5. Form a group and go through the lecture notes so you can fill in gaps. Between you, you will have most of the information you need and discussing the notes will help you to understand the subject.
Top tips for learning from lecturesBefore the lecture
  • prepare for lectures - find out what is in the books on the subject so that you are aware of what you do not need to note in the lecture
  • form an opinion about the subject of the lecture
  • set yourself questions and leave spaces to have these answered during the lecture.
During the lecture
  • listen to 'make sense' rather than to make notes
  • listen for 'signposts' about what is coming next or for summaries of key points
  • listen for answers to questions you set in advance
  • write yourself questions so you can trace answers and information after the lecture
  • make brief notes of essential points.
After the lecture
  • read your notes and fill in any gaps
  • discuss the lecture with other people
  • consider how the lecture changed or developed your opinions of the subject
  • label and file your notes.
TopGetting supportLevels of support

The amount of support available from teaching staff will vary a great deal. Usually this is much less than people are used to from school or college. There may be more help available where programme numbers are small or where the work is based mostly in a studio or laboratory. However, in general, you are expected to take the lead in:

  • identifying what you need
  • looking for ways of solving problems
  • finding out what information and support is available
  • making use of available support.
Using support from lecturers and teaching staff

Lecturers provide information and guidance in Handbooks, in their feedback on your assignments and in handouts. They expect you to consult this before coming to ask for additional help.

Lecturers may not work full time at the university. Some of these lecturers will not be available to give extra help, as they may work at other jobs when they are not teaching you.

Other lecturers will have only a small amount of time to offer to any one student. They will not be able to go through your work with you in the detail you may have received at college. In order to make best use of the short time they can offer you:

  • work through the difficulty as far as you can rather than expecting help at different stages
  • identify possible solutions and try these before seeing the tutor
  • write a list of key questions to ask
  • put these in order, with the most important first, in case you run out of time and do not get through the list
  • take your proposed solutions with you so that it is clear to the lecturer what you are trying to do
  • stick to the point when you see the tutor
  • be on time: if you are late, you will have less time with the tutor
  • tutors cannot usually run over the time allocated to you.
Support services

Universities offer a range of support services. Find out what is available and make use of these if you need them. It is better to ask for help early on if you are experiencing difficulty. It is more difficult to find a good solution if you let a difficulty run on without seeking help. Most services are confidential. The Student Union usually has support or welfare officers that can offer advice.

Set up your own support networks

It is expected that students will develop their own support networks. There are innumerable ways of doing this. For example, you could set up:

  • Support groups - these may focus on study, or bring together students from particular backgrounds such as mature students, students with disabilities, students from different ethnic backgrounds, international students, students living in a particular region on distance learning programmes, etc.
  • Discussion groups to debate themes and issues that arise in relation to the subject.
  • Reading groups to discuss themes that arise from subject texts.
  • Action sets to offer mutual guidance on short term action plans.
  • Lecture groups - these go through lecture notes to discuss themes and identify gaps in notes.

This content has been written by Stella Cottrell, author of The Study Skills Handbook

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Personalized PBL: Student-Designed Learning

Personalized PBL: Student-Designed Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Project-based learning may be the best vehicle for personalized learning as teachers move beyond "course-based" approaches and open the way for student-designed curriculum.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

All learning is personal. We filter the projects and curricula through our personal curricula whether we are teachers or students. Students are not designing curricula. Instead, they are mediating curricula through their autobiographical lenses. This is reconstructing.

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More money won’t fix need for change in education

More money won’t fix need for change in education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If the objective is to win the race between technology and education, and to close the gap between people without jobs and jobs without people, then we must raise our game
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I agree with the premise that there is enough money involved in School. It is poorly allocated and spent. I disagree with the premise that economic agendas prevail. That is actually at the heart of the issue along with poor money allocation and spending.

 

We need literate students, but that is not some far off abstract idea. It is more about what is happening in the immediacy of the present and what students need in their current lives. The long-term takes care of itself if the present is cared for well.

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How Free Play Can Define Kids’ Success - MindSh...

How Free Play Can Define Kids’ Success - MindSh... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Katrina Schwartz: "Free, unstructured playtime gives kids a chance to discover their interests and tap into their creativity.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students and teachers should play and enjoy their learning.

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Feature: What is the Mastery Model of Teaching Maths? | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Community

Feature: What is the Mastery Model of Teaching Maths? | UKEdChat.com - Supporting the #UKEdChat Education Community | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mastery learning happens when strong relationships emerge in classrooms and students find ways to apply the knowledge acquired in meaningful ways.

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Educational Leadership:For Each to Excel:What Neuroscience Says About Personalized Learning

Educational Leadership:For Each to Excel:What Neuroscience Says About Personalized Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is intriguing that with increased neuroscience research and articles reporting findings that little impact has found its way into School. I wonder what that suggests?

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Robert Hubert's curator insight, June 29, 2014 9:19 AM
"What Neuroscience Says About Personalized Learning"
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Stop Applauding: Feedback that Fosters Growth Mindsets

Stop Applauding: Feedback that Fosters Growth Mindsets | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

More than twenty years after Dr. Carol Dweck initiated her groundbreaking research on the power of mindsets, her findings have influenced a growing conversation about resilience, perseverance, and grit as determinants of student success. Her derivatives of attribution theory, growth mindset versus fixed mindset, have been used to emphasize the potency of words both in their intent as well as their consequences.

 


Via Patti Kinney, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The key points about feedback made by Debbie Silver suggest the importance of teaching and teachers who reflect on their practice.

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The Science of Attention- How To Capture & Hold Attention of Distracted Students

The Science of Attention- How To Capture & Hold Attention of Distracted Students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"How long can you reasonably expect your students to pay attention during your lessons? Some psychologists claim the typical student’s attention span is about 10 to 15 minutes long, yet most university classes last 50 to 90 minutes. Students’ attention levels vary widely based on factors like motivation, emotion, enjoyment, and time of day."


Via Beth Dichter, Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

If we are doing something we enjoy, attention becomes a non-issue and we engage in flow activities.

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Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, June 29, 2014 2:48 PM

15 great tips for engaging student attention. Well worth a read. 

Mélanie Ciussi's curator insight, June 30, 2014 5:39 PM

Etude à lire!

KCenter SKEMA's curator insight, July 15, 2014 11:25 AM

Grande question pour les enseignants surtout maintenant avec les "distractions" qui se multiplient

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from educational implications
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Why Kids Care More About Achievement Than Helping Others

Why Kids Care More About Achievement Than Helping Others | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A new study suggests that parents and teachers may be sending kids the wrong message.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Reinforcing the wrong things, means the wrong things are done. Modeling the right things i.e. compassion, honesty, respect, etc. sends messages we need in the world. When we lock into instrumental measures, as we do in School, we fail to engage in critical and healthy relationships with children.

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Sharrock's curator insight, June 28, 2014 10:48 AM

We are. And society as well. Think how often it academic achievement and aptitude are noted when seeking mercy for bad behavior.

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Lesson 1: You're Dead in the Water Without a Great Principal

Lesson 1: You're Dead in the Water Without a Great Principal | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

You know how they say that people come to look like their dogs? A parallel truism is that any organization comes to look like its leader. For some reason, though this idea is axiomatic in corporate life—who would attribute the success of Apple to its highly effective programmers?—when you get to schools, I rarely hear it said that every school embodies the values of its principal. But it’s meaningless to talk about teacher “effectiveness” outside of the context in which he or she works. One of the biggest lessons I learned this year is that a teacher cannot, repeat, cannot be effective for long in a dysfunctional community. And whether that school community is or is not functional is entirely dependent on the leadership of the principal.


Via Patti Kinney, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is no question that context and relationships are important. There are schools where teachers are leading the way without principals. This article suggests a hero-model of leadership which names the leader. Leading is quite different.

 

When leading lets go and is inclusive, it works. Most of what I experienced in School was management.

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Positively Deviant School Reform? - Huffington Post

Positively Deviant School Reform? - Huffington Post | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Positively Deviant School Reform?
Huffington Post
What, then, is the central goal of American school reform?

Via The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a provocative article in that we do not usually think of deviance as being positive. It can be. Teaching should remain critical for learning. I believe that the resources exist to transform education, rather than reform School. The resources are controlled by many who want to maintain a status quo that protects their work, rather than building on the goals of education the holistic forming of human beings.

 

Reformers have become focused on the next bright, shiny bauble whether it be a new school, the latest programmed instructional method, the latest gadget, etc. Education is a human endeavour.

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Don’t Spank the Gorilla

Don’t Spank the Gorilla | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Don’t expect the gorilla to cooperate if you’re spanking him. Insults don't enhance influence. You can’t antagonize and influence at the same time. The teammate you're complain about was hired by t...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I don't often choose articles lists in them, as lists suggest living, leading, and teaching are linear exercises. This article is thought-provoking and challenges us to think about the relationships we need in living, leading, and teaching.

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Let’s fix our broken education system

Let’s fix our broken education system | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How to go from B-roken to A-wesome while there’s still time.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I agree that we need conversations that include educators, policy makers, parents, and community members. I had conversations with parents and students several years ago and a key point that emerged was the importance of having caring relationships. This takes us beyond managing and to leading.

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Making Learning Meaningful: 6 Priorities For Whole Learning

Making Learning Meaningful: 6 Priorities For Whole Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"We recently discovered the Bay Area’s Prospect Sierra School’s interesting learning model that prioritizes 6 ideas for learning in the 21st century. There is, of course, no single “best” way to pursue “21st century learning”–nor any learning at all for that matter. But seeing the way other inspired educators pursue the idea can teach each one of us a lot. In this model, we appreciate the inclusion of self-knowledge, as well as moving past the idea of content to true disciplinary knowledge–seeing knowledge in context and application."


Via Beth Dichter, bill woodruff
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is no single best way to learn which suggests teaching remains central in the process.

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 26, 2014 9:22 PM

This post shares another visual that provides one model of learning in the 21st century. Specifically, it prioritizes six ideas:

* Disciplinary Knowledge - "Build and apply content knowledge to think deeply and act as a practitioner of the discipline"

* Self-Knowledge - "Experiment and create, while embracing failure as an opportunity for growth in order to design new ideas and solutions."

* Innovation Creation - "Recognize one’s emotional, physical, and learning needs, strengths, and challenges to nurture personal growth and resilience"

* Collaboration - "Share knowledge and resources, building on a diversity of ideas and experiences to achieve group goals and interdependence"

* Responsibility - "Understand one’s impact and influence in a local and global community; cultivate compassion, and take positive action"

* Communication - "Express ideas effectively through varied means of presentation; understand one’s audiences, actively listen; and build connection"

Additional information on each of these six ideas is included in the post.

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Fantastic Chart On 21st Century Education Vs Traditional Education

Fantastic Chart On 21st Century Education Vs Traditional Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Mark Hoffman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

21st Century School still requires teaching and content. The key is that teaching is inviting students into learning and the content also is inviting. Inviting and hosting learning is hard work which calls on teaching as relational and invokes curricula as a complex conversations. When we set up either/or binaries like this chart, we perpetuate a modernist view of School and not education.

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for the love of learning: Prentice slams Johnson's Task Force

for the love of learning: Prentice slams Johnson's Task Force | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We can build new schools, but without a change in what those schools mean we do not change their purpose. Schools have become something external to teaching and learning.

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