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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Edutopia. Poetry

Edutopia. Poetry | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Poetry is a great medium for students to improve their writing and creativity. I once attended a large PD sessions where the keynote address was quite disparaging towards writing poetry. I am not a language arts teacher, but I wonder how they felt about his comments.

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What’s the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Difficulty For Learning?

What’s the ‘Sweet Spot’ of Difficulty For Learning? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Tom Hoerr leads the New City School, a private elementary school in St. Louis, Mo., that has been working on grit. ‘One of the sayings that you hear around here a great deal is, 'If our kids have graduated from here with nothing but success, then we have failed them, because they haven’t learned how to respond to frustration and failure,'‘ says Hoerr. After years of focusing on the theory known as ‘multiple intelligences’ and trying to teach kids in their own style, Hoerr says he’s now pulling kids out of their comfort zones intentionally. ‘The message is that life isn’t always easy,’ Hoerr says. His goal is to make sure ‘that no matter how talented [students are], they hit the wall, so they can learn to pick themselves up, hit the wall again and pick themselves up again, and ultimately persevere and succeed.’ But even putting the question of educational trends aside, the experience of principal Tom Hoerr as documented in the NPR segment brings up a question that parents and teachers wrestle with all the time: Should we be making learning easier for kids—or harder? The answer, according to research in cognitive science and psychology, is both." | by Annie Murphy Paul


Via Todd Reimer, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is interesting is that John Dewey and Alfred North Whitehead's work indicates learning is always be on the edge of where we are comfortable reaching into zones of discomfort. Some might call it an ecotone where the ecosystem is very fluid. It is the way we support students in these spaces that is important. They can fail with support and build resiliency. This means teachers living in relationship with children rather than just facilitating and observing.

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Heinrich Erasmus's curator insight, March 27, 2:46 AM

This is a very interesting perspective on the current trend in the learning environment, whether it be primary, secondary or tertiary education. Like the article says towards the focus should remain on making education easy but harder. To clarify that statement, by making the education easier through proper education whether it be Multimedia or class room aspect. Another way to improve on making it easier is entertainment and group involvement just to name a few improvements. These variations in education style might be able to encourage more students to take on more difficult areas of study.

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Why bureaucracy must die - Fortune Management

Why bureaucracy must die - Fortune Management | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
To build organizations that are adaptable at their core, we will need to rework every management process so it enables, rather than frustrates, breakthrough thinking and relentless experimentation.

Via george_reed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Bureaucracies may play a role. Some complexity theorists suggest that bureaucrats would continue to frame the need for structure. There would also be a creative side. In between there would be a bridging group to make sure creativity does not run amok and bureaucracies do not strangle the creativity. We definitely need this in education.

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george_reed's curator insight, March 26, 6:55 PM

While we like to poke fun at bureaucracies for good reason, they do have a place. Clear lines of authority and responsibility, limited spans of control, an infinitely scalable model, and a clear division of labor all have merit. The question is, how might we harness those advantages and avoid the ponderous maladaptive organizations that we are so familiar with?

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How Does PISA Put the World at Risk (Part 3): Creating Illusory Models of Excellence

How Does PISA Put the World at Risk (Part 3): Creating Illusory Models of Excellence | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article raises many important what if questions. I do not know any students who have actually written a PISA test. The tests offer, at best, a small sample of a snapshot of learning in a particular nation, province, or jurisdiction. That people are making any form of serious educational decisions based on the results leads to a whole new set of questions about the competency of those making decisions, beyond those I already have.

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Innovative thinking needs to lead to innovative action.

Innovative thinking needs to lead to innovative action. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"Without change there is no innovation, creativity, or incentive for improvement. Those who initiate change will have a better opportunity to manage the change that is inevitable." William Pollard ...

Via Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The idea that there is not script given to administrators is, at best, inaccurate. The issues faced by classroom teachers are not being addressed by the managers and administrators I encountered in the same school division. Students and I made our own rules in classrooms i.e. wearing hats. The reason these conversations take 75 minutes is due to the idea that if we talk about the mundane we never have to address the real issues like the entrainment that suggests we are not working from scripts. Also, what does it say about leadership when a person says they get to make the rules in a school? Where is the change in that?

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Daydreaming or Deep in Thought? Using Formative Assessment to Evaluate Student Participation

Daydreaming or Deep in Thought? Using Formative Assessment to Evaluate Student Participation | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many instructors will argue that student participation in class is important. But what’s the difference between participation and engagement? What does good participation or engagement look like? How can you recognize it?

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Engagement is very often non-visible. Teachers need to have conversations that help reveal the engagement.

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How Assessment Can Lead to Deeper Learning

How Assessment Can Lead to Deeper Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Most educators, policymakers, and parents agree that today's students need a mix of knowledge, skills, and dispositions to prepare them to be successful and engaged citizens. Given that students need

Via Betina Astride
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students learn to be engaged citizens by being engaged citizens in their classroom communities not as separate abstract experiences. How students treat each other in the present moment sets the ground for how they will treat others and the world they live in for the future.

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leading and learning: New School Year - what has been achieved ?

leading and learning: New School Year - what has been achieved ? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Bruce makes a great point about slowing things down and lingering over learning. This is not in ready evidence in Alberta's schools. It is a centre piece of my dissertation writing. We need new ways of thinking over and watching over the learning of children and adults.

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Instruction in motion brings PE into classroom

Instruction in motion brings PE into classroom | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Each afternoon between social studies and math, Marilynn Szarka’s third-grade students start to get droopy. Szarka instructs everyone to stand up and spread out while she dims the lights, closes the d

Via Linda Alexander
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a very effective way to rejuvenate the mind and body. We should be asking why PE resources are declining. What does it say about our educational priorities?

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, March 25, 12:38 PM

This is the way to get the brain and body moving!  

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Overcoming the Fear of Being Wrong: 20 Ways To Help Your Students

Overcoming the Fear of Being Wrong: 20 Ways To Help Your Students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via EDTC@UTB, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A big reason students get things wrong is we ask them to memorize information that holds little meaning to them. When it comes time to apply it or be tested, it is not grounded in anything real to the student. The greatest successes in learning come when we can ground the learning meaningfully in students' lives and, for that matter, in teachers' lives. Even when they get it wrong, they respond much differently.

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Kirsten Wilson's curator insight, March 25, 11:54 AM

Great ideas and creates an opportunity for the reflective educator to evaluate instructional practices.

Rosemary Tyrrell's curator insight, March 25, 2:30 PM

Some good tips. 

Teresa Barclay's curator insight, March 26, 5:37 PM

Has insights that could help anyone, especially me as I go through my own education journey

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Handling Complexity in Decision-Making: Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings

Handling Complexity in Decision-Making:  Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Why would a $100M power plant zoning approval take 3 minutes and a request to build a $10,000 bike rack for city sidewalks take hours?

 

It's easy to be swept up in the trivial and fun stuff, starving the big issues for the time and consideration they merit.  Cyril Northcote Parkinson, a British historian and operations researcher, penned this extreme example of decision-making in meetings in his book Parkinson's Law. Paraphrasing the Wikipedia entry, the powerplant is so expensive, the sums of money are hard to frame.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most humans have no comprehension of $100 million, but understand $10, 000.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 24, 12:27 PM

This is a post useful for anyone connected to public sector meetings, or any meeting with complex topics.  I've posted this in change leadership watch for the reasons of asking you, the reader the question, have you ever helped a decision making body avoid the The Abilene Paradox, a classic management film about avoiding mismanaged agreement?

This post also illustrates the power of Parkinson's Law where board members lazily skip over the seemingly impenetrable problem in the meeting, deferring to the team managing the project. There will be implications for years of this city council meeting's decisions, and yet it is decided in three minutes.  It's astounding, assuming we haven't been excluded from a long list of previous meeting discussions.   ~ D

Tom Russell's curator insight, March 27, 7:00 AM

I'm sure we can all identify with this scenario. It reminds me of a school football game when everybody is running after the ball regardless of their agreed position on the pitch. Clearly where there is passion there is engagement, so focussing on, and agreeing, clear outcomes is a key starting point if one is going to avoid everyone being kicked in the shins.

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Antonio Gramsci’s Impact on Critical Pedagogy.pdf - Google Drive

Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting that critical pedagogy has not had more impact in education. One young teacher told me that in her undergrad studies Freire's work was used for inquiry based learning which misses the point.

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Instructivism, constructivism or connectivism?

Instructivism, constructivism or connectivism? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Instructivism is dead. Gone are the days of an authoritarian teacher transmitting pre-defined information to passive students. In the 1990s, constructivism heralded a new dawn in instructional desi...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting article. I am not sure we moved past treating students as passive vessels and filling them with information which we cannot really do.  Information needs to be transformed into something useful through practical wisdom and applied wisely.

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From Metaphysics to Poetic Dwelling: Heidegger's Task of Thinking

From Metaphysics to Poetic Dwelling: Heidegger's Task of Thinking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A forthcoming thinker, who might want to attempt the task to adopt the thinking which I am trying to set up, he will have to cope with an idea written by Heinrich von Kleist. I wrote it down in one...

Via Keith Wayne Brown
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am always looking for sources about Heidegger's work which is central to my dissertation. He is difficult to read so this might prove helpful.

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Keith Wayne Brown's curator insight, March 27, 9:52 AM

Nice essay that lays out some insights about the late Heidegger: 

"...The general contention of this essay is that there is a link between certain themes of Heidegger’s later work that ties them together as helpful means for the task Heidegger assigns to future thinking. The link here is one that in itself requires an open mind: it is the notion of openness, or composure, in experience (Gelassenheit). As I hope to show, this notion characterizes certain themes in Heidegger’s later reflections: those of the Clearing, of Heidegger’s turn against the Subject-centered Humanism behind Metaphysics and, its progeny, technological thinking; of Art and, overall, Heidegger’s notion of a ‘thing’; and, finally, of Poetic Dwelling..."

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Avoiding the Trap of "Q A Teaching"

Avoiding the Trap of "Q  A Teaching" | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Petra Claflin, Digital Media Manager for YES Prep Public Schools, identifies the problem of 'Q&A teaching' and offers five tips for teachers to examine and improve their modeling and direct instruction practice.

Via Sarantis Chelmis
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I video taped a colleague teaching and myself teaching. It is much different than what we think we are doing. My colleague insisted on seeing the video and we had quite a good conversation about what was revealed.

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Is a Culture of Discipline the Right Approach For Your Organization?

Is a Culture of Discipline the Right Approach For Your Organization? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Jim Collins said that “a culture of discipline is not a principle of business; it is a principle of greatness.” Those words might resonate with many leaders who are feeling frustrated …

Via Anne Leong, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The discipline organizations is self-discipline. External discipline is punitive and ineffective. Responsibility builds out of self-discipline whereas accountability is an external process. We have many examples of external discipline and accountability in education with few examples of self-discipline and responsibility.

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Keaton Toscano's curator insight, March 27, 12:29 PM

This article discusses discipline as the root cause of all collaboration and productivity problems as a part of any team, and I think the message it has to offer can be readily applied to the classroom. One major problem is idenfitied as being a lack of clear direction, something invaluable for learning; if you can't see the big picture, then what is motivating you to start down this path? Another issue is identified as consistency; you can't go making exceptions for your favorite employee or student. Consequences and rewards can't be relative, there needs to be a solid reward system for your actions or respect can be lost. Overall this article is a good place to start when trying to establish a healthy classroom attitude.

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Why Getting Comfortable With Discomfort Is Crucial To Success

Why Getting Comfortable With Discomfort Is Crucial To Success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In an increasingly competitive, cautious and accelerated world, those who are willing to take risks, step out of their comfort zone and into the discomfort of uncertainty will be those who will reap the biggest rewards. When I first left my parents’ small farm at eighteen to move to “the city” [...]

Via Anne Leong, Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting that the key questions are binary with yes and no answers. Flipping them to what and how questions lets a person explore their understanding of answers more deeply and perhaps incompletely.

 

I find it interesting that many in education who at the vanguard of change are the most focused on binary questions which serve the purpose of sustaining an outdated status quo.

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AlGonzalezinfo's curator insight, March 28, 7:24 AM

Great scoop by Anne Leong via via @anne_leong.  As a work with a number of clients and continue my own journey through this process, I find the questions listed extremely helpful!


Again and again, we have to decide:

  • Do I keep doing what’s always been done, or challenge old assumptions ad try new approaches to problems?
  • Do I proactively seek new challenges or just manage those I already have?
  • Do I risk being exposed and vulnerable, or act to protect my pride and patch of power?  
  • Do I ask for what I really want, or just for what I think others want to give me?
  • Do I ‘toot my horn’ to ensure others know what I’m capable of, or just hope my efforts will be noticed?
  • Do I speak my mind or bite my lip, lest I ruffle feathers or subject myself to criticism?
Brian Kirby's curator insight, April 1, 11:07 AM

Wow, those questions were not exactly "fun" to answer (especially rapidly and honestly). However, I have always been told that "If your dreams don't scare you, then they aren't big enough". This is something that I have lived my life by for quite some time now, and it definitely appears to be more than true... "If you are always comfortable, then you are never growing." It's worth some discomfort/fear in order to grow and reach goals! Thoughts? How tempting is it to stay under the umbrella of comfort? Is it worth it?

Brian Kirby's curator insight, April 1, 11:08 AM

Wow, those questions were not exactly "fun" to answer (especially rapidly and honestly). However, I have always been told that "If your dreams don't scare you, then they aren't big enough". This is something that I have lived my life by for quite some time now, and it definitely appears to be more than true... "If you are always comfortable, then you are never growing." It's worth some discomfort/fear in order to grow and reach goals! Thoughts? How tempting is it to stay under the umbrella of comfort? Is it worth it?

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Secrets of teachers who love their jobs: focus on a child you can really help -

Secrets of teachers who love their jobs: focus on a child you can really help - | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“Sometimes I feel like my blog and the web in general are filled with posts that only address how challenging teaching is, and neglect the fact that it’s also incredibly rewarding and enjoyable. I want to spread the word to discouraged teachers: there is still hope for you in this profession. So, this monthly post series …”


Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , simondcollins
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These are all key points. It is not the classroom that poses problems for teachers. It is the administration and managers that drove me out of the classroom. I loved what I did and the students I learned with in the classroom.

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Where Are Teachers Needed The Most In The World Right Now?

Where Are Teachers Needed The Most In The World Right Now? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Things that matter. Pass 'em on.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers will be needed because there are underlying trends i.e. young teachers not entering classrooms and leaving early. This is a universal problem.

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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 25, 4:30 PM
My guess, rural, inner city and developing nations.
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Teaching 21st Century Skills to Ready Students for the World of Work

Teaching 21st Century Skills to Ready Students for the World of Work | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

What are the jobs of the future? How can I steer my daughter to a career which offers the best potential for secure employment? If I am honest with her, no one really knows.


Via Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is important is students learning skills and dispositions that allow freedom and adaptability in the future. This is accomplished by having meaningful educative practices that connect to students' lives.

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Robert Hubert's curator insight, March 25, 7:37 PM
Some discussion of nature/form of educational programs for the developing world and also reference made to Waterloo's Coop program
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What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets

What’s Your Learning Disposition? How to Foster Students’ Mindsets | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck’s work on growth mindsets has dominated much of the attention around how students can influence their own learning. But there are other ways to help students tap into their own motivation, too. Here are a few other important mindsets to consider.

Via ThePinkSalmon
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This thinking needs to be extended to adults. Schools where adults feel they belong and are full members of a community function much better and are healthy places for children.

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5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention

5 Assessment Forms That Promote Content Retention | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If we hope to construct enduring understanding in our students, it's critical that, now more than ever, we know their strengths and interests. By incorporating students' strengths and weakness into a

Via Nicolás Dominguez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These all make sense. I used them in various ways in my classrooms throughout the years.

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We Need an Education System that Promotes Creativity, Innovation, and Critical Thinking

We Need an Education System that Promotes Creativity, Innovation, and Critical Thinking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Let's not wait another 50 years to reform the primary and secondary education systems in this country, because we can't afford not to. Let's start now.

Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need the first two for sure, but the way critical thinking is taught in schools is formulaic and oppressive.

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Ian Korman's comment, March 28, 12:46 AM
My feeling is that Critical Thinking is diametrically opposed to religion. It is difficult to teach a child this skill but then deny them to apply it to religious ideas that don't do well when examined in this way.
Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s comment, March 28, 6:21 PM
Ian, you are entitled to your narrow, uninformed perspective but living and working in a Buddhist country, you could not be more wrong. The twisting of religious dogma to state that critical thinking is opposed to religion shows the ignorance within your statement and all religion scholars (PhD's) would laugh at your misinformed statement. ...critical thinking is a form of deeper learning "the process of purposeful, self-regulatory judgment.
Ian Korman's comment, March 31, 3:58 AM
Rob, people that believe in religion often don't feel that they need to think critically about many things because the critical thinking has already been done for them. Even worse, for Buddhists, it can be considered a waste of time to think critically since they are placed on this world to suffer and no amount of critical thinking will change that. However, ignorance can be blissful.
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for the love of learning: Albertans need to stop holding their noses to vote

for the love of learning: Albertans need to stop holding their noses to vote | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We do need other political alternatives and we need alternatives that look at education not from outside classrooms, but from within the classrooms where teachers and students live.

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‘Closed’ v. ‘open’ systems of knowing | Dangerously Irrelevant

‘Closed’ v. ‘open’ systems of knowing | Dangerously Irrelevant | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers need to be great question askers. Their questions need to shake up personal and collective status quo. This type of model teaches students the power of questions and helps them create their own.

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