Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Education Readings September 26

Education Readings September 26 | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allan.alach@ihug.co.nz. This week’s homework!   William Mathis on "Economics, Education and Sitting ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Another group of links to articles. The one about Sitting Bull, Economics, and Education is worth multiple reads.

 

The neo-liberal agenda currently driving School reform as an economic engine misses the point of preparing children for the futue that can only begin today. Economy comes from the Greek oikos meaning household. Reading Wendell Berry and Arne Naess helps me get my head around that. As well ecos, meaning place, fits into the ecological thinking. Do we ask deep questions or are we assuming given answers? Sitting Bull was asking a question which could not be easily answered, would have ongoing dialogue in the questioning, and always be open to never assuming presupposed answers.

 

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The Modern Craftsman’s Guide: Work with Dignity

The Modern Craftsman’s Guide: Work with Dignity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When we separate ourselves from our work, we lose dignity in our labor. Here's how to get it back.

Via Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Who we are as people, as teachers, is a complex amalgam of our entire lives and the world we live in. The idea of compartmentalizing is foreign.

 

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9 Habits That Lead to Terrible Decisions

9 Habits That Lead to Terrible Decisions | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

A study of 360-feedback data from more than 50,000 leaders and compared the behavior of those who were perceived to be making poor decisions with that of the people perceived to be making very good decisions.

 

Nine factors emerged as the most common paths to poor decision making. Here they are in order from most to least significant.

 

Laziness. This showed up as a failure to check facts, to take the initiative, to confirm assumptions, or to gather additional input. Basically, such people were perceived to be sloppy in their work and unwilling to put themselves out. They relied on past experience and expected results simply to be an extrapolation of the past.Not anticipating unexpected events. It is discouraging to consistently consider the possibility of negative events in our lives, and so most people assume the worst will not happen. Unfortunately, bad things happen fairly often. People die, get divorced, and have accidents. Markets crash, house prices go down, and friends are unreliable. There is excellent research demonstrating that if people just take the time to consider what might go wrong, they are actually very good at anticipating problems. But many people just get so excited about a decision they are making that they never take the time to do that simple due-diligence.Indecisiveness. At the other end of the scale, when faced with a complex decision that will be based on constantly changing data, it’s easy to continue to study the data, ask for one more report, or perform yet one more analysis before a decision gets made. When the reports and the analysis take much longer than expected, poor decision makers delay, and the opportunity is missed. It takes courage to look at the data, consider the consequences responsibly, and then move forward. Oftentimes indecision is worse than making the wrong decision. Those most paralyzed by fear are the ones who believe that one mistake will ruin their careers and so avoid any risk at all.Remaining locked in the past. Some people make poor decisions because they’re using the same old data or processes they always have. Such people get used to approaches that worked in the past and tend not to look for approaches that will work better. Better the devil they know. But, too often, when a decision is destined to go wrong, it’s because the old process is based on assumptions that are no longer true. Poor decision makers fail to keep those base assumptions in mind when applying the tried and true.Having no strategic alignment. Bad decisions sometimes stem from a failure to connect the problem to the overall strategy. In the absence of a clear strategy that provides context, many solutions appear to make sense. When tightly linked to a clear strategy, the better solutions quickly begin to rise to the top.Over-dependence. Some decisions are never made because one person is waiting for another, who in turn is waiting for someone else’s decision or input. Effective decision makers find a way to act independently when necessary.Isolation. Some of those leaders are waiting for input because they’ve not taken steps to get it in a timely manner or have not established the relationships that would enable them to draw on other people’s expertise when they need to. All our research (and many others’) on effective decision making recognizes that involving others with the relevant knowledge, experience, and expertise improves the quality of the decision. This is not news. So the question is why. Sometimes people lack the necessary networking skills to access the right information. Other times, we’ve found, people do not involve others because they want the credit for a decision. Unfortunately they get to take the blame for the bad decisions, as well.Lack of technical depth. Organizations today are very complex, and even the best leaders do not have enough technical depth to fully understand multifaceted issues. But when decision makers rely on others’ knowledge and expertise without any perspective of their own, they have a difficult time integrating that information to make effective decisions. And when they lack even basic knowledge and expertise, they have no way to tell if a decision is brilliant or terrible. We continue to find that the best executives have deep expertise. And when they still don’t have the technical depth to understand the implications of the decisions they face, they make it their business to find the talent they need to help them.Failure to communicate the what, where, when, and how associated with their decisions. Some good decisions become bad decisions because people don’t understand – or even know about — them. Communicating a decision, its rational and implications, is critical to the successful implementation of a decision.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Can we anticipate unexpected events? Yes, but we cannot anticipate what they will be. What we can do is work on being present and attentive. The laziness is interesting. Do we use statistics without looking at what they mean in a given context. The other night I sat in on a panel and there was no reference to how a number might play out in a specific school setting or classroom or students lives.

 

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, September 25, 2014 8:28 AM

This is a strong argument for embracing personal knowledge mastery as a leader. 

John Michel's curator insight, September 25, 2014 3:13 PM

Waiting too long for others’ input. Failing to get the right input at the right time. Failing to understand that input through insufficient skills. Failing to understand when something that worked in the past will not work now. Failing to know when to make a decision without all the right information and when to wait for more advice. It’s no wonder good people make bad decisions. The path to good decision making is narrow, and it’s far from straight. But keeping in mind the pitfalls can make any leader a more effective decision maker.

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7 Tenets of Creative Thinking

7 Tenets of Creative Thinking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Michael Michalko explains that everyone is an artist and that it takes belief and persistence to nurture this quality. He offers seven principles about creative thinking that he wishes he'd known as a student.

Via Cindy Rudy, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are interesting points made in the article. For example, your brain is not a computer is important. It is not about inputs and outputs as binaries and algorithms.

 

Are we sure there are just 7 tenets?

 

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Compassion – A Cornerstone In Today's Leadership

Compassion – A Cornerstone In Today's Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Learn why compassion is critical in today's leadership and what 3 measures you can employ to demonstrate compassion in your leadership.

Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Robert Greenleaf in writing about servant-leadership spoke about the importance of compassion integrating with passion. It is not enough to be passionate about the work we do. It has be done in a humane and human way.

 

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donhornsby's curator insight, September 24, 2014 10:52 AM

(From the article): This is why compassion is vital in today’s leadership because it’s the key to the internal driving force found within each us to understand what motivates our employees, what matters to them, and how we can connect the work they do to the shared purpose that defines why we do what we do. No doubt this is why studies have shown that compassion in the workplace leads to not only higher levels of employee engagement and job satisfaction, but lower levels of employee absenteeism and burnout.

 

So if compassion is a cornerstone to effective leadership in today’s faster-paced, 24/7 global environment, how can we go about building and strengthening our innate ability to not only empathize, but to be curious about those we lead, and what motivates them to bring their best selves to work?

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"16 Trends Shaping the Future of Ethical Leadership"

This infographic was first shared on Top 100 Thought Leader Linda Fisher Thornton's Blog at LeadinginContext.com/Blog. It has become a reader favorite. Intensi…

 

Learn more:

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics

 

http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we allow external forces to be the sole adjudicators of what is ethical, we create ethical problems.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 24, 2014 11:41 AM
This infographic was first shared on Top 100 Thought Leader Linda Fisher Thornton's Blog at LeadinginContext.com/Blog. It has become a reader favorite. Intensi…


Learn more:


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Ethics


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=LeaderShip


Ian Berry's curator insight, September 24, 2014 6:50 PM

I love the list of 16. It explains really well the shifts that are happening.

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Leadership By Virtue: Dào (Dao, Tao) – the Way

Leadership By Virtue: Dào (Dao, Tao) – the Way | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Dao is usually translated as way, road, channel, path, doctrine, or line.

Via Jaro Berce
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Dao comes without any traces and leaves without any boundaries.

 

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Looking Back to Move Forward

Looking Back to Move Forward | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

As I reflect on my 25-year career as a middle level administrator, one of the high points was the creation of an alternative learning environment for a group of seventh grade students. Realizing a growth bubble was heading towards the middle school, a partnership between the school district and a state-operated farm museum became a reality that offered a school-within-a-school opportunity for almost 30 students while reducing class size in the traditional middle school.


Via Patti Kinney, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Nothing is as simple as it appears.

 

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Suvi Salo's curator insight, September 23, 2014 10:41 AM

"Let go of ownership."

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Stage Fright and the Importance of Breathing

Stage Fright and the Importance of Breathing | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Begin experimenting with your breath awareness in daily life, and notice how rarely you breathe fully, and how often you allow stress to take over!


Via the listener, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers and students would benefit from this short, insightful, and humourous article.

 

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Suvi Salo's curator insight, September 22, 2014 3:57 PM

"When students are first beginning performing, help them to become of the breath and how can it can help them to focus and calm down."

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Read Slowly to Benefit Your Brain and Cut Stress

Read Slowly to Benefit Your Brain and Cut Stress | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
At least 30 minutes of uninterrupted reading with a book or e-book helps.

Via Sandra - Onlinevents
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Reading something important invites whiling over it and pondering it. It is marathon.

 

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How to Make Kids Listen to Their Minds

How to Make Kids Listen to Their Minds | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Self-reflection to help enlighten children is being introduced into classrooms worldwide
There are two jobs that have become a lot more difficult in recent years. One is being a teacher, which was never easy at the best of times.

Via Dean J. Fusto
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Mindfulness can work for both teachers and students.

 

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I'm Not in Love with the Word Empowerment

I'm Not in Love with the Word Empowerment | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I’m not.  I cringe when I hear it used lately.  And I say that as someone who used to have it on my resume.  Right up near the top.   Because for me to empower you, especially when I hear the word ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not either. But, I am not in love with thinking School and learning are businesses. Teaching is relational and engages students through inviting them into their learning. When we fall short, we send a new invitation out in new ways.

 

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Don’t let anyone ever tell you that you are not artistic

Don’t let anyone ever tell you that you are not artistic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
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I think about teaching as artistic. It is creative and do not mean we are creating products with the children we teach, but we express ourselves in artistic ways through teaching and learning. Forming identities are part of these processes. It is like being on an eco-tone, like an intertidal zone. The tide sweeps in and out revealing something new in our character.

 

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for the love of learning: Teaching would be easier if it wasn't for the students

for the love of learning: Teaching would be easier if it wasn't for the students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
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I had a principal who early in the year would remind us that the students parents were sending to School were the best children they had. They were not hiding better ones at home.

 

Teaching is relational. That presents both challenges and reward as Joe describes in this post.

 

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How do you plan? redux

How do you plan? redux | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The post below is a greatly revised version of a 2-year-old post. I thought it worth doing in light of a recent comment to the previous post on the teacher job description. Here is the comment: For...


Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Two issues arose in the selection of textbooks. Teachers and others in Schools confuse the text for curriculum. It is not. Secondly, we did not always spend time making choices and understanding what was i the text.

 

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12 Promises You Should Make to Yourself and Keep Forever

12 Promises You Should Make to Yourself and Keep Forever | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Practical Tips for Productive Living

Via John Michel, Sílvia Dias, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure we own our lives, but we can be responsible for it and what happens in it. I found many teachers and their bosses were always looking for ways to not be responsible. What do you want from me was a common question.

 

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Marcela Contreras M's curator insight, September 26, 2014 12:46 PM

Think positive, just do it. 

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Teaching is complex: Don't try to simplify what teachers do

Teaching is complex: Don't try to simplify what teachers do | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Prominent educator Stephen Dinham recently made some criticisms of primary teaching, some of which I support, but some were too simplistic. His views on educational research and his criticisms of 'process' versus product fail to acknowledge the complexity and nuances of developing skilled teaching.

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D., Suvi Salo, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Last night, when I told a person that my research would be qualitative, they were left speechless. Most of panel discussion quoted quantitative research and spoke little about teaching. The word stakeholders was used as a place holder in the discussion. When we think that the appropriate language is business language we begin to fall short of the complexity of teaching.

 

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, September 23, 2014 9:36 PM

A thoughtful article as we continue the discussion about teaching and its implications for learning.

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New model leaders: How leadership is changing

New model leaders: How leadership is changing | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Anne Leong, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
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Leading is all about changing. When it becomes just talking about change, it is management and maintaining the status quo. I sat in on a panel last night about leadership in School. Despite the best efforts, the panel spoke about management not leading.

 

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Jerry Busone's curator insight, September 25, 2014 8:49 AM

Good read Leading is about a collaborative and collective approach today. 

Jerry Busone's curator insight, October 11, 2014 8:18 AM

leading in a new world and collective leading are very now in leading teams ... Find "Off the Bench Leadership" on Amazon and find out more about leading today.

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When You Compromise Your Values

When You Compromise Your Values | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Whether you work for a large corporation with a lot of co-workers or a small business, you should do what is ethically right no matter what others around you do. You and only you can claim the fame...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What is right cannot be predetermined. It is not a canon of rules and laws which are handed down by the boss. It is not a series of hackneyed cliches i.e. it's all about the kids. It is about what is right in a given moment.

 

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Hawken School: The Woodstock Of K-12 Education (Lean Entrepreneurship)

Hawken School: The Woodstock Of K-12 Education (Lean Entrepreneurship) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
VideoDescribing something as the “Woodstock of…” has taken to mean a one-of-a-kind historic gathering. It happened recently when a group of educators came to the ranch to learn how to teach Lean entrepreneurship to K-12 students. — We Can Do Better than Teaching Students How to Run a Lemonade Stand Over the last few years [...]
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We have to be careful that economic agendas do not override the importance of what children need to be learning.

 

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Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences

Why Students Should Take the Lead in Parent-Teacher Conferences | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Students own their struggles and strengths when they lead parent-teacher conferences.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/09/06/digital-citizenship-internet-safety-and-cyber-security-advisory-board-run-by-students/

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a point in saying learning is the students` responsibility. I think that means they need a bigger voice in the proceedings and this is increasingly important as they mature.

 

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Durriyyah Kemp's curator insight, September 24, 2014 10:12 AM

I love this idea.  At my son's school, the fall conferences are facilitated by the teachers, and the spring conferences are lead by the students.  It is a very nice way of allowing students to take responsibility for their effort and work-- to take pride in it, and/or recognize areas that need to be strengthened.  When students are aware that they will have to converse with their parents and teacher(s) about their work, they may take more time to ensure they are producing work that they can be proud of.

Quran Coaching's curator insight, September 25, 2014 9:52 AM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
#quran #onlineQuran #islam #Tajweed

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Learning is not just for students

Learning is not just for students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

By Kristen Weatherby, Senior Analyst at OECD The latest results from the OECD Teaching and Learning International Survey (TALIS) were released last week in countries around the globe. TALIS 2013 su...


Via Dan Kirsch, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Some very good authors i.e. Gert Biesta, Bill Pinar, Madeline Grumet, etc. have been writing about this using Dewey, Whitehead, Bruner, etc. as foundational.

 

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Leadership Starts With You

Leadership Starts With You | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Most leadership failure is the result of poor self-leadership. Leading yourself - personal leadership - is the most important tasks of any leader. It’s the most important set of practices a leader can develop.

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

If we think of each person at least leading themselves, everyone becomes a leader. We begin in relationship with our self and move outward. Leading is about learning and teaching. It is about sensing and living in the world.

 

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Jerry Busone's curator insight, September 23, 2014 8:50 AM

You are the solution... Great read

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Massacre by Micromanaging

Massacre by Micromanaging | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“The more you use your reins, the less they’ll use their brains” – The Horse Whisperer This is going to be a post about a killer of professional development, micromanagement...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The opening quote from The Horse Whisperer is appropriate. School has a lot of micro-management. I think it is the way we have done things in School for so long we don't know how to break free and allow creativity to emerge.

 

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Food For the Soul, Skills From the Arts, Why Teachers Quit « Dr. Doug Green

Food For the Soul, Skills From the Arts, Why Teachers Quit « Dr. Doug Green | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article includes links to other articles. Some of the topics explore why teachers leave the profession, why we should teach music, and supporting new teachers. The first and third might fit together.

 

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