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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Identity, community and trajectories - Jawitz (2009)

Identity, community and trajectories - Jawitz (2009) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The following is a bit of a reaction to one of the readings set for Week 1 of the NGL course. The reading was actually part of the old version of the course and it was brought over into this offeri...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This might be helpful with the dissertation.

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Are You A Civilized Leader?

Are You A Civilized Leader? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As Peter Drucker once said, “Good manners are the lubricating oil of organizations.” Effective leaders of today know that good manners and civility are...

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Having good manners and being civil are essential. An important consideration is how authentic the behaviours are. I told students that sorry was another word in the dictionary unless they made a conscious effort to change problematic behaviours. I found that many of the managers I worked for in School knew the right words, but rarely used them with authenticity. It was about appearance rather than really transforming the self. Those who were authentic reached out to others and helped bridge differences with their work.

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Habits for Success in School and Life

Habits for Success in School and Life | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Take a moment to join us in a snapshot of a classroom we recently observed: Students are hard at work designing a travel brochure as a part of their study of Ireland. They need to think about how m...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I used these habits in my classrooms almost 20 years ago. They are excellent and students play a substantial role in their learning.

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colleen demille's curator insight, July 26, 2014 5:14 PM

Cultivating a growth mindset is key!

Cynthia Day's curator insight, July 27, 2014 11:21 AM

Cameras

Ideas

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Rethinking Rookies: Why Are More New Teachers Quitting Early? - Education Writers Association

Rethinking Rookies: Why Are More New Teachers Quitting Early? - Education Writers Association | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
For decades teaching was considered a stable profession, with many individuals spending their entire careers at the front of ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Without the emotional and physical support that all teachers require, it is likely the trend will continue. There are other factors which are sometimes overlooked i.e. do all education school grads enter classrooms, what demographic impacts accelerate leaving the profession and stabilize it, etc? Another consideration is the use of part-time contracts. This seems to have become more prevalent in Alberta where I taught. If you cannot live, do you you stay? I think we have seen some pretty oppressive tactics used by School managers and politicians on the business side of School which seems to override the education of children. What is unfortunate is many School managers think of themselves as teachers, but they have left the classroom, as well, in many cases.

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3C's to Supporting Student Success

3C's to Supporting Student Success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Care, captivate, and catapult: these are Katie Jacobs' daily practices to help her second graders become the best students and people they can possibly be.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I can think of other words i.e. compassion, confidence, community, etc. Captivate is important and moving forward is essential. When we stop moving we stop learning.

 

One struggle is with the desire to measure success. Is it always necessary. Sometimes being captivated and catapulted forward might be enough.

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A Self-Directed Learning Model For 21st Century Learners

A Self-Directed Learning Model For 21st Century Learners | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The goal of the model isn’t content knowledge (though it should produce that), but rather something closer to wisdom–learning how to learn, understanding what’s worth understanding, and perhaps most importantly, analyzing the purpose of learning (e.g., personal and social change). It also encourages the student to examine the relationship between study and work–an authentic “need to know” with important abstractions like citizenship and legacy.

 

It is therefore built around the central concept of self-knowledge–better understanding one’s self, and using work and study to inform one’s interactions with the world. It sounds very hippie, we know, but that’s part of the reason it exists–to offer an alternative to standards and content-focused and institutionally-centered “delivery” of information.


Via Patric Lougheed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Self-directed learning is important, however it happens with teachers working with students. Learning will continue to be relational and social. The key to self-directed learning will be that students take an increasing role in deciding what learning is important in their lives and working with their interests.

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Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey?

Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings July 25, 2014 Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey? “If I want to justify my existence, and continue to be obsessed with the notion that I’ve got to do something f...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Too often, we allow ignorance to justify certain behaviours. It blinds us to the humanity we owe each other. It is not that we come into the world knowing everything. Instead, it is about being open to seeing each other as humans. Education provides those opportunities.

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Learning to Read Does Not End in Fourth Grade

Learning to Read Does Not End in Fourth Grade | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Word-processing skills develop even past fifth grade

 

A new study published in the journal Developmental Science questions that assumption, showing that children are still learning to read past fourth and even fifth grade.

 

The shift to automatic word-processing, in which the brain recognizes whether a group of symbols constitutes a word within milliseconds, allowing fluid reading that helps the reader focus on the content of the text rather than on the words, may occur later than previously thought.

 


Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It might be that learning reading is a life-long learning and becomes more automatic as we practice, but readers never stop learning.

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 24, 2014 3:03 PM

"So if fourth-graders aren’t quite reading to learn, then when does the shift toward more complete automatic word-processing occur? According to Coch, that probably happens some time between fifth grade and college—a period she says that hasn’t been studied.


For now, the results strongly suggest that reading skills need to continue to be nurtured during that period. “


This certainly does suggest that teachers beyond fourth grade are still teachers of reading,” says Coch.

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Chapter 2. The nature of knowledge and the implications for teaching | Teaching in a Digital Age

Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I read some of the work I have done on my dissertation today. A key question emerging in the writing process is "What knowledge is important?" This is not a question we ask the whole group only, but one that is asked of each person. We make sense of what we learn based on what is important. Our personal life-stories and collective-stories mingle and form around the question about what is important.

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leading and learning: Edutopia - a great site( established by George Lucas) for creative teachers

leading and learning: Edutopia - a great site( established by George Lucas) for creative teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is not just traditional education, whatever that is, that can be isolating. Many of the reforms are also isolating. Teaching and learning are relational and social. When we isolate, we deny the human spirit which thrives in healthy relationships.

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OECD Report - Measuring Innovation in Education (Ontario data and World - country data)

OECD Report - Measuring Innovation in Education (Ontario data and World - country data) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Data and research on education including skills, literacy, research, elementary schools, childhood learning, vocational training and PISA, PIACC and TALIS surveys., This report explores the association between school innovation and different measures related to educational objectives. This book is the beginning of a new journey: it calls for innovations in the field of measurement – and not just of education.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Quran Coaching
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The study uses business metrics in evaluating educational innovation. This might be OK for some, however I do not see education as a business and think it is inappropriate to measure it as such. What has happened is that education has devolved into a prefabricated process of inputs and outputs called School using Technique.

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Les Howard's curator insight, July 23, 2014 9:34 AM

Very interesting publication.  Link to read it for free. Can click on individual country innovations.

Quran Coaching's curator insight, July 23, 2014 11:49 AM

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How Evolved Is Your Leadership Style?

How Evolved Is Your Leadership Style? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Leadership influences behavior. Effective leadership creates positive change by inspiring and motivating. It creates an environment where colleagues love their work and strive to perform at their

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leading is about power and how it flows. When we are conduits and let power flow through us, it works and allows others to take responsibility. It is not so much about giving them responsibly and about creating environments where responsibility is taken.

 

I compare it to teaching and learning. I cannot learn for students. They take responsibility for their learning. It does not mean I shirk responsibility in my teaching, rather I use it differently than the expert at the front of the class, with lights down, allowing children to do worksheets projected onto a screen while he checks a Twitter feed.

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Formative Assessment: The Secret Sauce of Blended Success

Formative Assessment:  The Secret Sauce of Blended Success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Although most people probably associate the term “assessment” with quizzes and exams, in reality these high-stakes activities represent a small subset of assessment opportunities. Educationally, assessments can be broken into two larger categories: summative and formative. Most of our experience with assessment usually comes in the form of summative assessment. We have our students take exams or write papers at the end of a chapter. Summative assessments are valuable because they let us know whether our students have successfully learned what we wanted them to learn. Summative assessments, however, are limited in that they provide little information to guide teaching because they usually serve as the endpoint of some instruction.

 

"Whereas summative assessments are assessments “of” learning, formative assessments are assessments “for” learning. They help to guide instruction and provide valuable information for the instructor and for the learner. Formative assessments can help to drive instructional decision-making and allow the instructor to “take the temperature” of the class. In the discussion with my colleague, I outlined the different phases of blended learning and highlighted opportunities for formative assessment in each."

 

- See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/educational-assessment/formative-assessment-secret-sauce-blended-success/?ET=facultyfocus:e80:154484a:&st=email#sthash.L5dbSYEK.dpuf

Via Patric Lougheed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is also a feature called assessment-as-learning which is an ongoing self-regulating process undertaken by teachers and students. The three features of assessment, summative, formative, and self-regulating, each play important roles. The challenge is that the first two are after-the-learning and need a complementary piece that students learn to use in their learning on an ongoing basis.

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Ed Tech Promoters Need to Realize We’re Not All Autodidacts ~ Slate

Ed Tech Promoters Need to Realize We’re Not All Autodidacts ~ Slate | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

by Annie Murphy Paul

 

"This is a very particular take on learning: the autodidact’s take. We shouldn’t mistake it for most people’s reality. Productive learning without guidance and support from others is rare. A pair of eminent researchers has gone so far as to call the very notion of self-directed learning “an urban legend in education.”

 

"In a paper published in Educational Psychologist last year, Paul A. Kirschner of the Open University of the Netherlands and Jeroen J.G. van Merriënboer of Maastricht University challenge the popular assumption “that it is the learner who knows best and that she or he should be the controlling force in her or his learning.”


Via Jim Lerman, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Very few people are true autodidacts. Even Bill Gates had mentors i.e. Warren Buffet. We should encourage self-directed learning, but realize it requires teaching and pedagogy.

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How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space

How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from Thinking Through Project-Based Learning: Guiding Deeper Inquiry by Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss. It was published this month by Corwin. Take a moment a...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Interacting with one another is essential in learning and problem-based learning. Creating spaces where this happens naturally is important and echoes the work John Dewey suggested was critical in teaching.

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Can Creativity be Taught? Results from research studies

Can Creativity be Taught? Results from research studies | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If creativity can be taught, how is it done? Results from studies on creativity by George Land, Teresa Amabile and IBM.

Via WELLENWIDE
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure that creativity can be taught. That does not mean it cannot be encouraged just as readily as it can be inhibited. Do we really teach non-creativity? Do we put up barriers to creative behaviours? John Dewey suggested the role of teachers was to create an environment where learning could happen. He did not mean this as a lock-step, one-size-fits-all process, but as one where the spaces were inviting and students participated in their learning. Little has changed in School since the study cited, but to put up more barriers to creativity.

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Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’

Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Vanderbilt University

 

"Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.  More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner.

 

Metacognitive practices increase students’ abilities to transfer or adapt their learning to new contexts and tasks."


Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Riley Klages, Les Howard, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Emotional intelligence and learning how to learn might be the two most important teaching work we do for children. It is about connecting with what is important in healthy ways and understanding learning more completely. We can never do this completely, but we should make the effort.

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 25, 2014 9:13 AM

Four assignments for explicit instruction:


  1. Preassessments—Encouraging Students to Examine Their Current Thinking
  2. The Muddiest Point—Giving Students Practice in Identifying Confusions
  3. Retrospective Postassessments—Pushing Students to Recognize Conceptual Change
  4. Reflective Journals—Providing a Forum in Which Students Monitor Their Own Thinking




Nicola Parkin's curator insight, July 28, 2014 7:35 PM

Nice! 4 strategies for helping learner learn to learn.

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25 Alternatives to Using the Word “Great”

25 Alternatives to Using the Word “Great” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Look at this list of phrases. You won't just see replacements for the word “great,” you'll see catalysts. These are reminders of what you can look for in the

Via Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The word that fits with great is amazing. I read some blogs where those two words are the only way of qualifying a noun.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, July 25, 2014 4:09 PM

this is great food for thought. 'Great" as a response almost says nothing when specifics or thoughts about why are so much better. It is similar to students saying they will try to improve by "Working harder' or 'studying." unless they can clarify specifically what that means to them, the improvement and deep thinking about it will never occur.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, July 25, 2014 4:11 PM

This is great food for thought. 'Great" as a response almost says nothing when specifics or thoughts about the :"why "are so much better and clearer.. It is similar to students saying they will try to improve by "Working harder' or 'studying." Unless they can clarify specifically what that means to them, the improvement and deep thinking about it will never occur.

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Interdisciplinary Literacy - Science

The Science Interdisciplinary Science Presentation for EMWP - Julie King, Lauren Luedtke, Jeff Taylor, Doug Baker and Julie Blomquist.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am reading David Smith's book Pedagon. He proposes a literacy challenge is we are speeding at such a pace we cannot take time and become literate in the learning we undertake. To be literate is to go deep below the superficial levels and spend time being subjected to the subjects we love.

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Word to the Wise: 10 Tips for First-Year Principals

Word to the Wise: 10 Tips for First-Year Principals | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By the time they step into the position, most principals have already spent years—even decades—in the classroom as teachers. This experience certainly comes in handy, but rarely is it enough…

Via Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The point about principals seeming to forget about their classroom experiences is what I saw with many principals, first year and beyond, particularly towards the end of my teaching. It coincided with their desire to create an imprint of a few of their favourite things i.e. digital technologies, 7 Habits, organize complementary courses, etc.

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Speculative Diction | By the numbers | University Affairs

Speculative Diction | By the numbers | University Affairs | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By the numbers
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching, learning, writing are political work. Political work suggests there is an engagement with a polis or community. It might be small, but we engage someone in that work.

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Education Readings July 25th

Education Readings July 25th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allan.alach@ihug.co.nz. This week’s homework! Is Education as We Know it On its Way Out? Your thoughts? “...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The link that caught my eye was the one about Leonard Cohen. I have listened to his music since the late 1960's. He is a wonderfully creative poet and performer. I liked his comment about creativity being a search for self-respect. When we create, we feel good about the person we are.

 

The other links look great, as well.

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Principals in U.S. Are More Likely to Consider Their Students Poor

Principals in U.S. Are More Likely to Consider Their Students Poor | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Perceptions of disadvantage may play role as American students from low-income families struggle more than counterparts in many other nations.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we use language which is diagnostic and based on learning being a place of deficiency, this is not just directed at those who live in poverty. It manifests itself most clearly there, but permeates School and its language.

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Ken Robinson rebuttal

Ken Robinson rebuttal | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Thanks to Scott Goodman, who sent me this essay analyzing Sir Ken's presentation on TED in response to my own piece on Sir Ken Robinson. Scott's analysis focuses more than mine on on Sir Ken's tech...

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I do have some issues with Sir Ken Robinson's views. For the most part, I have never considered them as an attack on classroom teachers. I see them as a justifiable criticism of a system that needs to be transformed. Quite often, his work is taken as a view that anything goes and I am not sure that is what he is suggesting. As well, I don't think he is saying the classroom teacher should be done away with. Here is where I think he does not go far enough. As a former classroom teacher, he might want to take the initiative and point out that many teachers are oppressed and provide ways for them to overcome an oppressive system which marginalizes their important and political work.

 

I found his work was often used to justify the widespread and thoughtless use of digital technologies and social media in  classrooms. With more clarification and a stand against the technocrats, bureaucrats, and so-called experts outside the classroom, Sir Ken would go a long ways towards helping improve the lot of teachers and students alike. He seems to not realize, and this is not unique to him, that many of the decision-makers are people who have not been in classrooms for decades, a sorry lot who sped through the classroom to tell us what they do not know, and others who have never been in the classroom.

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Why Employees Resist Change

Why Employees Resist Change | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
These are a few initial responses you may experience when you announce an organizational change to employees. You will be better able to change employees' attitudes and turn their resistance into cooperation, once you understand why some are resisting change.

Via Anne Leong, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When people resist, we see that as problematic. In fact, it might be just what we need at times and maybe a lot of the time. Resisting, questioning, and challenging should be part of the conversation. I experienced a lot of compliance and conformity in School where someone external to my classroom often set the goals for my classroom. It was very unpopular when I spoke up and questioned, resisted, and challenged.

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