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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Canada’s math woes are adding up

Canada’s math woes are adding up | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Alberta had the answers. Now, it’s just another province divided by education fads

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This fits with an early scoop that showed up in my email. There is no question that we need to change things, but we are only moving deck chairs around. What does real transformation look like?

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iPamba's curator insight, March 4, 3:51 PM

This rather glib piece combines generalizations about "the old fashion ways" with skepticism about "edu-crats" changing curricula. It correlates maintaining the status quo with top-scoring students on standardized tests to argue against "transformation."

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An Old-School Notion: Writing Required

An Old-School Notion: Writing Required | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Writing excels as both a way to assess learning and a means of deepening that learning.

Via anna smith, Lynnette Van Dyke, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a very interesting article.

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Special Report: Powering the Digital Classroom | eSchool News | eSchool News

Where does the disconnect between reality and the ideal digital classroom lie, and how can administrators address it effectively?
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is important to ask children their impressions. Do we ask teachers?

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Does 'discovery learning' prepare Alberta students for the 21st century or will it toss out a top tier education system?

Does 'discovery learning' prepare Alberta students for the 21st century or will it toss out a top tier education system? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Over the next two years, Alberta is preparing what may well be the most dramatic overhaul of Canadian school curricula in modern times
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we place the economic agenda ahead of the learning agenda, what will happen? This is trying to solve the problems we encounter with the same kind of thinking that got us into those problems.

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31 Most Invaluable Pieces Of Writing Advice From Famous Authors

31 Most Invaluable Pieces Of Writing Advice From Famous Authors | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many avid readers are also avid writers. It only makes sense that someone who loves the beauty of language would want to make a craft of it.

Via Lee Hall, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mark Twain looking out at me told me I needed to scoop this one.

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Lee Hall's curator insight, May 29, 2013 10:43 AM

If you teach writing, you will want to use some of these with your students.

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Equations Are Art inside a Mathematician’s Brain

Equations Are Art inside a Mathematician’s Brain | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A brain area associated with emotional reactions to beauty activates when mathematicians view especially pleasing formulas

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I suspect that is the case regardless of one's work. If we are passionate about what we do, the essence of that work is revealed in the way we think and live in the world.

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Five Empowering Ways To Improve Teamwork

Five Empowering Ways To Improve Teamwork | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Good teams don’t always get along. If you’re on a team that’s stuck in limiting patterns and is struggling to find harmony, this Alignment Process movie session is a perfect way to make a shift. A ...

Via Peace Overtures
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The merkats got my attention. Change does begin from within and what that means to us. When change is problematic, it might be a sign it is time to move on.

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Peace Overtures's curator insight, March 4, 2:33 PM

If your team needs to discover a new way of working together then watch this movie. Look for the following five empowering ways to improve your teamwork.

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How to get recognized as an emerging young leader

 “What are some good ways to get recognized as an emerging young leader in your organization without sounding like you're trying to toot your own horn?”
My mother always told me if you just kept your head down and did good work, you would get ahead in your career. While there is certainly some truth to that advice, there’s a lot more too it when it comes to getting noticed for your leadership potential.

I’ll share some insider information with you as to how most organizations look assess for leadership potential.


According to research by the Corporate Leadership Council, performance was found to be more of a “gatekeeper” to being even considered for promotion to the next level. That is, 90% of “high potentials” were strong performers. So, yes, being great at whatever you are doing matters. If you’re a poor or average performer in your current role, you’ll never be considered for higher level responsibilities.  While we all like to think of ourselves of being a top performer, the reality is, most of us are not. So step one, especially early in a career, is to establish a consistent track record of strong performance.

However, only 29% of high performers have what it takes to succeed at the next level. Other factors come into play when it comes to predicting success at the next level, including aspiration (willingness to take on new, higher level responsibilities), engagement (your commitment and willingness to go the extra mile), and ability (a combination of innate characteristics and learned skills).


The good news is, many of the abilities that organizations look at to evaluate leadership potential can be learned. According to Development Dimensions International, employees that demonstrate the following abilities have a strong chance at being successful in a senior leadership role:

1. Propensity to lead. They step up to leadership opportunities.


2. They bring out the best in others


3. Authenticity. They have integrity, admit mistakes, and don’t let their egos get in their way


4. Receptivity to feedback. They seek out and welcome feedback


5. Learning agility.


6. Adaptability. Adaptability reflects a person's skill at juggling competing demands and adjusting to new situations and people. A key here is maintaining an unswerving, "can do" attitude in the face of change.


7. Navigates ambiguity. This trait enables people to simplify complex issues and make decisions without having all the facts.


8. Conceptual thinking. Like great chess players and baseball managers,
the best leaders always have the big picture in mind. Their ability to think two, three, or more moves ahead is what separates them from competitors.


9. Cultural fit


10. Passion for results


So, I’d suggest evaluating yourself against these characteristics and see where you stack up. Of course, there are limits to self-assessment (we tend to be clueless as to how we are perceived by others), so it’s even better if you can get some candid feedback from your boss or others.

Then, identify 1-2 things you need to get better at and create a development plan to address those areas. I’d recommend sharing it with boss, for a number of reasons.  First of all, to get your bosses feedback, and secondly, to get additional ideas and support. Finally, going back to the “aspiration” component of potential, to show that you’re interested in leadership development and willing to do what it takes to learn and grow.
Just one more thing when it comes to “tooting your own horn”. That’s something many of us are not comfortable with, and no one wants to be seen as a self-promoting blowhard. It’s always better when other people toot your horn for you. That is, your boss and decision makers are hearing good things about you behind your back, from your peers and others. Given that, managers, as much as they should, are not always aware of every one of their employee’s accomplishments. It’s up to you to humbly let them know on a regular basis during your regular meetings, and especially during your annual performance review. A lot of managers will ask for performance review “input” – this is the one time per year that you are allowed to loudly toot that horn.

It’s the lucky few that can just consistently shine and get picked for one plum role after another. The rest of have to work hard at it, do a little self-promotion, and have the confidence to ask for it when the opportunity presents itself.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I find the key factors interesting. I rarely saw them in education where management is more valued than leading.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, March 4, 6:29 AM
This is how leaders should be evaluated in an ideal world. Unfortunately, depending on the organization, decisions are made for other reasons entirely. Actual results on performance may have nothing to do with bestowing an emergent leader title or promotion for that matter. Nonetheless, employees do care about their performance relative to others and the ten skills listed are excellent items to consider for personal development. After all, "good show" is merely entertainment if there are no good results that follow. You can't fool people in the long run. ~ V.B.
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Warren Bennis on Six Competencies Exemplary Leaders Share

Warren Bennis on Six Competencies Exemplary Leaders Share | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In Bennis’ four decades of research, observation and study of leadership, he was one of the first to identify the overall effect of leadership on organizations. Most conclude, he said,that leadership competence makes a positive difference of approximately fifteen percent in organizational effectiveness.  


Via Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting he used the word engaged rather than empowered. They have substantially different meanings. Being empowered suggests someone gives you power. Engaging suggests that we find our power sources and it flows through social interactions.

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Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 4, 8:15 AM

Among the six competencies noted by Bennis are Alignment, Engagement,  Adaptation/Agility and Getting Results (Execution); these are the four key factors in the Empowering Effectiveness Model of organizational effectiveness.The other competencies noted in the article, Generating Trust and Developing Leaders also have an indirect role in effectiveness as they promote engagement, alignment, agility and execution.  To explain the other 85% of  organizational effectiveness, consider your favorite organizational model. Beyond leadership, these models provide a variety of places to look for opportunites to enhance agility, alignment, engagement and execution. 

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The Hidden Benefits Of A 'Productive Failure'

The Hidden Benefits Of A 'Productive Failure' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We might learn more from failing than succeeding.

Via David Ednie
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Teachers have to be there and ask the right questions to guide students. It is a subtle and active process which creates a space for the learner to work towards their learning.
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David Ednie's curator insight, March 3, 1:16 PM

"When you are ready, the teacher shall appear." the old proverb states. Taking that idea one level further: "When you are struggling with a challenge, a master, a teacher, a mentor, or a productive failure will appear. The key to success then lies in the struggle not in possessing the answer. Seek opportunities to learn from Productive Failure.   

Lindsey Adams's curator insight, March 3, 7:34 PM

This article shows the benifits of letting students struggle with problems before receiving any help. Discusses how this allows students to connect on a different level with what they are learning and understand it better in the long run. 

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Components of a Truly Effective Culture

Components of a Truly Effective Culture | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Forget the monolithic change management programs and focus on the elements of your culture that drive performance.

 

To sustain a true competitive edge, your culture should accelerate business performance. This is the ultimate goal of the critical few.

 

Four indicators can reveal that your culture is boosting the business.

 

1. Your culture taps into the waiting reserves of energy within lots of people. If you have a culture focused on a certain set of performance outcomes, and employees buy into it, people start reinforcing one another informally. Simply put, they increasingly help one another feel good about what they need to do. As a result, you gain a greater level of emotional commitment to the work that matters most.


2. Your culture guides down-the-line decision making. If you have a strong culture, you don’t need to have prescribed policies for every permutation of a situation. Employees can rely on cultural influences to help determine what they should do—they will act with speed, and they’ll take initiative. You simply do not need all those formal sign-offs when you have the right kind of cultural support. When nobody is there to give the approval, the culture guides the individual in how to act.


3. Your culture builds enduring execution capability. Over time, critical behaviors are repeated; as they turn into habits, people become faster and better at executing. You see evidence of greater customer loyalty, higher levels of the kinds of employee engagement that matter most for performance, higher degrees of emotional commitment to what the organization is focused on, a more rigorous pursuit of continuous improvement, and greater resilience in downturns.


4. Behaviors in normal times emulate positive behaviors during crisis situations. We often hear executives praise the collaborative, selfless, and energetic behaviors of their people during a crisis—and lament the fact that they don’t see more of those kinds of interactions normally. This difference is in large part explainable by the activation of cultural forces that occurs during a crisis. When you are focused on activating those forces all the time, you get that “special” level of performance all the time.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Critical informal leaders are important in culture change.
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Leadership - 12 Questions To Exponential Knowledge

Leadership - 12 Questions To Exponential Knowledge | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Everyone you meet knows more than you. You possess pockets of knowledge that excel others. But, when you think you know, assume you don’t. Image source Even when you know the "most," many know more...

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Theory is always tested in the practical day-to-day. That is where the wisdom lies. Knowledge is barren without those tests.

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It’s The Goal Of The Question That Matters

It’s The Goal Of The Question That Matters | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It's The Goal Of The Question That Matters

Via Howard Fulfrost
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

And, the goal matters even more when we understand that students and teachers arrive in schools with their personal curricula involved.

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Howard Fulfrost's curator insight, March 3, 9:34 AM

For those of you who hated statistics, and never understood "validity," this is a really well-written, easily understood article that talks about whether the test measures what it intends to measure; in other words, is it a valid measure.

Howard Fulfrost's curator insight, March 3, 10:18 AM

For those of you who hated statistics, and never understood "validity," this is a really well-written, easily understood article that talks about whether the test measures what it intends to measure; in other words, is it a valid measure.

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The Neuroscience of Good Coaching

The Neuroscience of Good Coaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
New research suggests how to coach—and be coached—more effectively.

Via Suvi Salo, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is great research out there that teaching or coaching play major roles in learning. It is the way we can attempt to engage students and learners.

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for the love of learning: Progressive Education: What it isn't

for the love of learning: Progressive Education: What it isn't | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an informative article drawn from the work of Alfie Kohn.

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The disruptive power of collaboration: An interview with Clay Shirky | McKinsey & Company

The disruptive power of collaboration: An interview with Clay Shirky | McKinsey & Company | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How we collaborate has profound implications for how we live and work. The author and New York University professor explains how social media has upended traditional norms. A McKinsey & Company article.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Sharing does change everything. Humans have gotten away from that concept and look where we are.

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Getting Parents Involved in Schools

Getting Parents Involved in Schools | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Parent involvement continues to challenge practitioners engaged in school reform despite being a required component of many school improvement initiatives-from Title I Schoolwide Programs to federally mandated school improvement plans. The benefits of parent involvement are clear: A growing body of research shows that successful parent involvement improves not only student behavior and attendance but also positively affects student achievement.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a great article. I would add do not let the bureaucrats and technocrats get involved.

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Sharrock's curator insight, March 4, 11:55 AM

excerpt: "Of course, the use of any strategy must be tailored to the school's population. If families don't have reliable access to the Internet, e-mail won't work. A phone message in English won't communicate much to parents who speak only Spanish. The bottom line for schools is to communicate using strategies that convey what is important in a way that can be heard by parents and families and invites them to respond."

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Student Motivation: An Overlooked Piece of School Reform ~ Center on Education Policy, George Washington Univ.

Student Motivation: An Overlooked Piece of School Reform ~ Center on Education Policy, George Washington Univ. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

by Alexandra Usher and Nancy Kober

 

"This series of papers examines topics related to students’ academic motivation, a critical but often overlooked aspect of education. The summary paper, Student Motivation: An Overlooked Piece of School Reform, pulls together research findings from the six background papers, each of which includes a brief overview of research findings, examples of current programs and policies, and implications for the future, offering a more in-depth look at specific themes surrounding student engagement, including: why motivation is important and how it might be defined and measured; whether rewarding students can result in higher motivation; whether students can be motivated by goal-setting; the role of parental involvement, family background, and culture; strategies schools might use to motivate students; and nontraditional approaches to motivating otherwise unenthusiastic students. The appendix outlines four major dimensions of motivation and how they are defined by major scholars in the field."

- See more at: http://www.cep-dc.org/displayDocument.cfm?DocumentID=405#sthash.TLwjCrxo.dpuf

 

 


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Student motivation is critical to teaching. That suggests there is something relational in the motivation of students.

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Leadership Is Dangerous

Leadership Is Dangerous | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
My good friend Joseph Lalonde released his free eBook a couple of weeks ago, LEADERSHIP IS DANGEROUS: Four Traps That a Leader Should Avoid. Sometimes we become leaders by accident. It leaves us wo...

Via Amy Melendez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is dangerous, because it comes without certainty. That makes it potentially humbling as one become vulnerable in the face of risk.

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Why Einstein, JFK, Edison, and Marie Curie All Doodled

Why Einstein, JFK, Edison, and Marie Curie All Doodled | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Drawing is right up there with reading, writing, & having group discussions.

Via Karen Bowden
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The neat thing about doodling is it takes so many forms and is personal. It is like we have a personal signature through our doodling.

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Compassionate management: the softer side of leadership

Compassionate management: the softer side of leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
More and more companies are embracing the softer touch.

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Robert Greenleaf, in his writing on servant-leadership, suggested we get lost in the passion without compassion. The two come from the same roots and are important in our lives.

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6 Dimensions of Organizational Culture - Which One is Right for You ...

6 Dimensions of Organizational Culture - Which One is Right for You ... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
There is a strong focus on achieving an end result. Of the six dimensions, this dimension correlates most strongly with organizational effectiveness; organizations with goal-oriented cultures are more effective than those with ...

Via Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some interesting points here. The one about open vs. closed system suggests there is a bit of a small and intimate feel to an organization.

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Frank J. Papotto, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 3, 10:43 AM

This is an interesting take on Organizational Culture that builds on the  Competing Values Framework,  but the approach is too rigid.  It is more useful to think about these 6 dimensions as the themes that all can get more or less emphasis within a given culture. It's likely that multiple, not a single one will dominate and that both extremes of the dimensions will be found in some parts of the organization.  In effective organizations  you will undoubtedly find a blend of the extremes of  all theses dimensions. 

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The Myth Of The Bell Curve: Look For The Hyper-Performers

The Myth Of The Bell Curve: Look For The Hyper-Performers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
There is a long standing belief in business that people performance follows the Bell Curve (also called the Normal Distribution). This belief has been embedded in many business practices: performance appraisals, compensation models, and even how we get graded in school. (Remember "grading by the curve?") Research shows that this statistical model, while easy to [...]

Via george_reed, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
What is interesting about the power law curve is that it is the Bell curve on its side. We had to tilt our heads to get there and have a different perspective.
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Lindsey Adams's curator insight, March 3, 7:41 PM

While this article discuses the use of the bell curve in the business environment, it can easily be transfered over to education. It discuses the misrepresentation of performance using the curve and how the curve engourages average performances. 

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10 Ways to Build Teacher Leaders

10 Ways to Build Teacher Leaders | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"You don't need to be in a leadership position, to be a leader." By Jill Thompson We need teacher leaders! Why? Teacher leaders are the ones that make change happen. They are the ones that understa...

Via Fishtree Education
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We do not build leaders. Having said that, teachers are leaders by the very vocation of teaching. Pedagogy is leading. Education is a forming, nurturing, and leading  process for students and teachers. The problem might be we manage too many things and leading is about letting go and opening up.

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jewell Moss's curator insight, March 3, 3:29 PM

There are simple ways to be a leader, do you have the qualities? Any one can lead, and any one can teach with the right qualities.

Bailey Rufer's curator insight, April 10, 11:19 AM

Being a leader in the classroom is fairly important, especially when leading kids towards their future. Being a teacher leader is very important because you're the person that gives students the tools to a bright future. You are the person that is able to bend and form a student into a "bright star", and teachers that lead are always there for children to look up to.

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Ask Better Questions, Do More Stuff, and Think About Maps?

The innovation posts that caught my attention this week highlight the importance of asking better questions, and using an experimental approach to improve our innovation skills.

Via Anne Leong, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We do need to ask much better questions. The questions should hold space for many answers and new questions to emerge. Quite often, we foreclose the conversation with presupposed answers and stop looking for different answers and the questions that lead us further.

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