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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Education Policy & Practice
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48 million Americans live in poverty, Census Bureau says

48 million Americans live in poverty, Census Bureau says | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
48 million Americans are living in poverty according to the latest Census report.

Via OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, Christopher Tienken
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Canada's percentage of people in poverty would be similar, perhaps slightly less i.e. 12%. What does that mean for School?

 

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Christopher Tienken's curator insight, October 17, 2014 4:52 PM

It's ok. Common Core and national testing will help....

Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, October 18, 2014 1:09 AM

There is no excuse for 48 million of our citizens living in marginal housing and earning substandard wages, while we spend billions to police the world.  Our first priority should be to help the less fortunate in our own country , then, if anything remains, extend help to others. Congress needs to straighten out its priorities.  Aloha, Russ.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Cool School Ideas
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10 Reasons Nonreaders Don't Read — And How to Change Their Minds | Scholastic.com

10 Reasons Nonreaders Don't Read — And How to Change Their Minds | Scholastic.com | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Children are not born with a natural aversion to reading. Learn how to help reluctant readers begin to love books.


Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Point 2, they cannot read as fast as their peers, is also part of the diagnostic process. Does it make sense that the ability to read is based on speed? What happened to enjoying and whiling over the the worth of something worth reading?

 

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Dan Keldsen's curator insight, October 18, 2014 12:25 AM

Stereotypes and generalizations are just plain lazy. Do the work to understand how people behave, what the want (in reality, not what they say they want), how they react, and stop playing to the stereotypes you may have fallen into.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Active learning in Higher Education
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American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn't Exist | WIRED

American Schools Are Training Kids for a World That Doesn't Exist | WIRED | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Over the next twenty years the earth is predicted to add another two billion people. Having nearly exhausted nature’s ability to feed the planet, we now need to discover a new food system. The global climate will continue to change. To save our coastlines, and maintain acceptable living conditions for more than a billion people, we need to discover new science, engineering, design, and architectural methods, and pioneer economic models that sustain their implementation and maintenance. Microbiological threats will increase as our traditional techniques of anti-microbial defense lead to greater and greater resistances, and to thwart these we must discover new approaches to medical treatment, which we can afford, and implement in ways that incite compliance and good health. The many rich and varied human cultures of the earth will continue to mix, more rapidly than they ever have, through mass population movements and unprecedented information exchange, and to preserve social harmony we need to discover new cultural referents, practices, and environments of cultural exchange. In such conditions the futures of law, medicine, philosophy, engineering, and agriculture – with just about every other field – are to be rediscovered.

Being dumb in the existing educational system is bad enough. Failing to create a new way of learning adapted to contemporary circumstances might be a national disaster. The good news is, some people are working on it.


Via Kim Flintoff
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting article which points out that School is not meeting the needs today and is not likely to meet the needs of tomorrow without substantial change.

 

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Kim Flintoff's curator insight, October 17, 2014 8:08 PM

This ceraiinly seems to be a rationale for investigating more effective ways of fostering learning.  It could be suggested that the only core skills we all need are:

 

- the capacity to learn and relearn,

- the capacity to determine what learning is required,

- the ability to assist others with learning and

-  resilience to see that through the inevitable challenges that arise when we breach the limits of our comfort zone.

One wonders if national education policies and national curricula are fully supportive of this requisite shift in focus?

Lee SCHLENKER's curator insight, October 18, 2014 3:35 AM

Being dumb in the existing educational system is bad enough. Failing to create a new way of learning adapted to contemporary circumstances might be a global disaster.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from the Change Samurai
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Resistance to change in organisations

Resistance to change in organisations | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Infographic: Resistance to change in organisations - Understanding the most common reasons employees resist change - Torben Rick

Via the Change Samurai
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is not just fear of the unknown. My experience was there was exceptionally poor communication, top-down oppressive ways of dealing with change, faddish approaches, etc. For example, the implementation of the 7 Habits work and digital technologies was a handful of people's dictates rather than consulting with classroom teachers who were doing the heavy lifting.

 

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Rob Kingston's curator insight, October 18, 2014 11:27 AM

you can't manage change if you don't first understand the resistance  to change.  This concise and accurate infographic helps simplify it. 

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What Is Experiential Learning?

What Is Experiential Learning? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Experiential learning theory suggests that all learning is created by grasping and transforming experiences. Learn more about the theory and the experiential learning cycle.

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The names of those involved in the foundational thinking behind experiential learning is impressive i.e. Dewey and Piaget. As well, Montessori's name might be added to the list.

 

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 16, 2014 10:43 PM

Thanks to Ivon Prefontaine.

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Dissertations of the Influential

Dissertations of the Influential | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many of our best and brightest write dissertations in their mid to late twenties.

Via Dr Peter Carey
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is important not to lose track that even older people can add to the creative process.Also, dissertations might not be the only measures of creativity.

 

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teaching, Learning, Growing
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Tech Is Changing Teaching, Finally - Harvard Education Group


Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think the article misses the point when it says finally. Change is incremental and hard to see, but is always happening. Too many educational reformers want to be able to tear it down and have overnight change. The one point missing besides that is do digital technologies help us lead and care for children? That is what pedagogy is all about.

 

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 16, 2014 8:34 AM

I'm a tad offended by the use of the word "finally," but I also understand the point as so often educators try to do what they've always done but with different tools. However, the article points out that many teachers have been using technology as they have cobbled together a range of resources, and they have been using technology to support their pedagogy and their students' learning. Right on!

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 16, 2014 9:18 AM

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Thinking Out Loud
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1 and 1 = 2, no?

1 and 1 = 2, no? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“You think because you understand 'one' you must also understand 'two', because one and one make two. But you must also understand 'and'.” ― Rumi There goes my childhood education… Haven’t we (almo...

Via Patrick Verdonk
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Nothing is all inclusive. That is a great way to end the article. The Rumi quote was an interesting way to begin.

 

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Patrick Verdonk's comment, October 21, 2014 8:21 AM
Thanks Ivon; Much of what I read seems to be written in a black or white style (do this or you're doomed, do that and all will be fine), while I believe there's a whole spectrum in between. Hope with my posts to add some color...
Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from iEduc@rt
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10 Ways to Boost Brain Power for Young Students

10 Ways to Boost Brain Power for Young Students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Research into neuroscience and brain power is among the most fascinating due to its impact on education. And when it comes to young learners, strategies for optimizing brain development are essenti...


Via Marisel Mateluna, Reucover
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article includes the fine arts, caring environments, mindfulness, and enjoying what we do with our students.

 

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Teaching, Learning, Growing
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25 Things Skilled Learners Do Differently - InformED

25 Things Skilled Learners Do Differently - InformED | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Imagine for a moment that all human beings had the same IQ, but that some of us knew how to tap into it better than others. How would we approach educati

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first two points are great: thinking about thinking and being curious. The rest flows from there.

 

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 15, 2014 3:56 PM

Reminds us there are specific skills we can model for our students, enhance or refine for others, and coach in others.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Digital Learning, Technology, Education
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3 Mindsets You've Got to Lose to be a Healthy Homeschool Mom - Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers

3 Mindsets You've Got to Lose to be a Healthy Homeschool Mom - Weird Unsocialized Homeschoolers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I’m pretty sure it was Leslie Sansone who said, “The best workout is the one you’ll do.” If the workout you’ll do is one that is born of an active past-time that you enjoy, all the better – especially since many of those options can also be family activities. If you can teach your kids at a young age to enjoy being active, they’re more likely to live a healthier, active lifestyle as adults.

Via Amy Melendez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Actually, I found and find home school children better socialized than many children who attend School. What makes them stand out is their curiosity, their questions, and their respect for learning.

 

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Amy Melendez's curator insight, October 15, 2014 10:17 AM

From the article: "I’m pretty sure it was Leslie Sansone who said, “The best workout is the one you’ll do.” If the workout you’ll do is one that is born of an active past-time that you enjoy, all the better – especially since many of those options can also be family activities. If you can teach your kids at a young age to enjoy being active, they’re more likely to live a healthier, active lifestyle as adults."

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Digital Delights - Digital Tribes
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Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment

Make It Count: Providing Feedback as Formative Assessment | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Giving feedback that is non-evaluative, specific, timely, and goal-related will provide students with opportunities to revise and improve their work and deepen their understanding.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Last night I made the point in a workshop that feedback is based on building trusting relationships which often goes overlooked. Yes, students want feedback. The key is who is giving it to them and is their trust embedded in the relationships.

 

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from 3D Virtual-Real Worlds: Ed Tech
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The Power of "I Don't Know"

The Power of "I Don't Know" | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Educators are tasked with teaching students how to find answers themselves. And it all starts with a simple three-word phrase: I don't know.

Via David W. Deeds
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching could be about saying "I don't know" and waiting, in the uncomfortable silence that follows, for students to begin their exploring with you. As teachers and students become more comfortable with that silence, students accept responsibility for their learning.

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David W. Deeds's curator insight, October 14, 2014 4:38 PM

And this topic keeps coming up too! ;)

Artur Coelho's curator insight, October 14, 2014 5:34 PM

yep. isto sou eu a usar o scratch com os alunos: "não sei, não faço ideia, mas e que tal irmos descobrir como é?"

Paul leslie large's curator insight, October 14, 2014 11:51 PM

Includes a great activity with Google Search.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Effective Education
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25 Practices That Foster Lifelong Learning - InformED

25 Practices That Foster Lifelong Learning - InformED | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Is your capacity for learning is fixed or fluid? Can you improve your intelligence and talents through hard work and practice, or are you stuck with the brains you’ve got? Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck says most of us have either a “fixed” or “growth” mindset when it comes to learning. Most of us can get through sixteen years of schooling regardless of which mindset we have, but when it comes to lifelong learning–learning for the sake of learning, without outside pressure–only a growth mindset will cut it."


Via Beth Dichter, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning is an essential aspect of living. I am not an advocate of the glib language that is fostered in 7 Habits thinking i.e. begin with the end in mine. It is great to have goals, but learning is often a non-linear, complex, chaotic process which defies that limited logic. The Dewey quote is echoed in the thinking of many others i.e. Whitehead, Montessori, Gadamer, etc. It is not just about learning. It is about forming and character which exceeds simple learning.

 

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Tony Guzman's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:47 AM

I am a firm believer of lifelong learning and this

Li Banban's curator insight, October 20, 2014 8:23 PM

keep a growth mindset! its never too late to  learn.

Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, November 7, 2014 4:43 AM

These are excellent teaching and learning resources to add to your 21st Century learning environment to promote lifelong learning.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from EdTech Equity
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Deasy slams teachers unions, speaks of regrets

Deasy slams teachers unions,  speaks of regrets | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Days after stepping down as Los Angeles schools chief, John Deasy acknowledged he should have worked harder to improve relations with the school board but also criticized the teachers union for making it difficult to improve the district.


Via J. Mark Schwanz
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers and students are often left voiceless in the battles between corporate School managers and their equivalents in the unions.

 

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J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, October 17, 2014 7:57 PM
Blame needs to turn into action.
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Education Readings October 17th

Education Readings October 17th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allan.alach@ihug.co.nz. This week’s homework!   Are You an Autodidact? Or Do You Need Other People T...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article that was an interest to me was the one about School serving the economy. Yes, it does, but who makes the decisions is an important one. What does this mean for teaching and learning?

 

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How Kids Lose Their Creativity As They Age (And How To Prevent It)

How Kids Lose Their Creativity As They Age (And How To Prevent It) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ever since the 1950s, children have undergone a test for tracking their creativity, in similar fashion to the IQ test. Professor E. Paul Torrance developed the series of tasks, which are administered by a psychologist, to a subject to measure the person’s ability to produce something original and useful. No [...]

Via Creativity For Life, David Hain, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some good points which teachers would find helpful in their work.

 

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, October 17, 2014 3:24 PM

Struggling Teens often are those kids who cannot/will-not give up their creativity.  Those are not broken kids needing serious treatment, but confused kids trying to find their way and making poor decisions.  There are schools working on this creativity gap, and should be a model for mainstream kids. -Lon


Nick Hester's curator insight, October 18, 2014 6:35 AM

Celebrate diversity, be open, share, listen and learn...

Dr. Pat McGuire's curator insight, October 20, 2014 11:41 AM

When my children were small we spent a great deal of time being creative and playing the "what if" game to test out theories. That is not seen with children in my practice much anymore.  They are stuck in overly compartmentalized learning and playing.  Few of them know what to do if told to go outside.

 

We need to bring curiosity and creativity back into the forefront of child development and learning.  I see the loss of this as being as devastating as when children were told "Do it because I said so and don't ask questions."

 

What do you think?

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Myths about the brain 'hamper effective teaching' - Telegraph

Myths about the brain 'hamper effective teaching' - Telegraph | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Research published today suggests that widely believed myths about neuroscience are being used to justify classroom practice that has "no educational value"

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is interesting work.

 

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Curriculum That Questions The Purpose Of Knowledge

Curriculum That Questions The Purpose Of Knowledge | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Curriculum That Questions The Purpose Of Knowledge

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

John Dewey suggested we are continuously reconstructing our knowledge. Knowledge might be understood as know-ledge. We are always on the edge of learning something new and reconstructing what we think we know.

 

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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, October 16, 2014 8:04 AM

This is the macro and the micro level question: Why? Why do we need or want students to learn certain things? What criteria do we use to privilege certain learning over other learning? More importantly, how do we reiterate to our students and ourselves that that which we are teaching in a classroom situation is a small fraction of all that they could learn about anything, and that what we're really teaching them is how to learn and giving them a baseline from which to work.


In the quest to review, reform, re-vision curriculum, we have to remember that the curriculum should be a starting point for students and their learning, not the end.

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, October 16, 2014 9:19 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from New Learning - Ny læring
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Don't Help Your Kids With Their Homework

Don't Help Your Kids With Their Homework | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
And other insights from a ground- breaking study of how parents impact children’s academic achievement

Via Ove Christensen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It depends on what we think helping is. Doing the homework and providing many of the solutions is not help. Asking questions and providing support in directing a child in their learning can be helpful.

 

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Testing Teacher Professionalism

Testing Teacher Professionalism | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Treehorn Express Testing Teacher Professionalism About 5 years ago [10 Jan.2010] I wrote an article called TESTING TEACHER PROFESSIONALISM. Its revised version is offered below. The article, un...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We allow those furthest from the daily work in the classroom to decide who a teacher is and what teaching is.

 

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The Evolving Classroom: Creating Experiential Learning Spaces (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

The Evolving Classroom: Creating Experiential Learning Spaces (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Research shows that experiential learning enhances student engagement and success. For example, a meta-analysis of 225 previously published studies on the effects of active learning in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) courses revealed active learning's benefits.1 The analysis showed that students in traditional lecture sections are 1.5 times more likely to fail than students in active learning settings. Moreover, course grades were six percent higher when instructors used an active learning pedagogy. Students scoring in the 50th percentile in traditional lecture sections moved to the 68th percentile in active learning sections. Overall, the analysis projected that 3,516 fewer students would have failed STEM courses had instructors employed active learning approaches.


Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We have known about experiential learning for some time. It is an important component of outdoor education's pedagogy.

 

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Supports for Leadership
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Preparing Principals: Consider the Adaptive Challenge

Preparing Principals: Consider the Adaptive Challenge | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Tom Vander Ark - As opportunity improves with access, EdLeaders are becoming adaptive and design minded, suggesting new ways to develop EdLeaders.

Via Patti Kinney, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The problem with much of School management is that leadership is still being treated as a technical problem solving process rather than adaptive and relational processes which are pretty messy.

 

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Making #love and making personal #branding #leadership
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The Wisdom of Lao Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Getting Things Done #GTD

The Wisdom of Lao Tzu: A Taoist Guide to Getting Things Done #GTD | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Note: This is a guest post by Michael Miles of EffortlessAbundance.com. We live in a competitive society and are often told that to get ahead we require dr


Via Ivan Berlocher, Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Ancient texts are wonderful sources of wisdom which can guide our daily lives in many ways.

 

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for the love of learning: Teacher reflects on Alberta's new Student Learner Assessments

for the love of learning: Teacher reflects on Alberta's new Student Learner Assessments | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Standardized testing, by whatever name, do not help teachers get to know their students better. They may place barriers in the way of that process. Digital technologies, although helpful tools at times, seem to add to the challenge.

 

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