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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Bad Leadership, Ethics, Fraud and Poor Management
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Why Employees Leave Their Jobs (Infographic)

Here's what employees consider before walking out the door. (From data and anecdotes, this is so very true. http://t.co/On9zSWgVaf)

Via F. Thunus, Stepped Leader
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The rate of teacher turnover is about 50% within the first 7 years. This is costly in many ways and certainly impacts student learning

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donhornsby's curator insight, July 4, 9:35 AM

It's easy to guess why gainfully employed people decide to up and leave their jobs. However, discovering the real reasons why individuals quit can be a little bit more difficult. 

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Natural Hierarchy: the 3 Requirements of the Ideal Job.

Natural Hierarchy: the 3 Requirements of the Ideal Job. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Three Principles for Right Livelihood: 1. Do what you love 2. Do something that makes you money 3. Do something that is of benefit to others
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

They are three pretty simple rules. Teaching would seem to be work that could integrate all three. The article reminded me of a quote from Jon Kabat-Zinn: "Find a job with a capital J and stop doing another's work."

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Vision Statements That Work: The Long and Short of It

Vision Statements That Work: The Long and Short of It | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How long should your vision statement be? The answer: Long enough. Long enough to evoke a noble sense of purpose, provide a call to action, and describe a clear picture of your destination. These four vision statements work because they condense a lot of information into an inspiring statement that is quickly understood by most people. If you were not familiar with the context, it would require a much longer statement to explain them. xxxxxxxxA computer on every desk. ~Steve Jobs xxxxxxxxA computer on every desk in every home running Microsoft software. ~Bill Gates xxxxxxxxProduce an affordable automobile. ~Henry Ford xxxxxxxxOne team, one country. ~Nelson Mandela HOWEVER…most effective vision statements are NOT short statements. Consider Martin Luther . . . → Read More: Vision Statements That Work: The Long and Short of It

Via Mel Riddile, Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

In successful companies and schools, the vision statement belongs and is embraced by each person because they felt they contributed to it. Anything else falls short.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Leadership
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Teach the Key Ingredients for Leadership Success

Teach the Key Ingredients for Leadership Success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
There’s a major disconnect between what companies look for in their top performers and best leaders, and what students learn in school. Why don’t we better align these skill sets? For instance, among educators there is lots of talk these days about “grit”: the tenacity to focus on working toward a goal despite obstacles and... Read more »

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a key point about improving learning in classrooms where emotional intelligence is a core teaching and learning principle.

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Tom Hood's curator insight, July 4, 8:54 AM

Having just finished our fifth class of Leadership Academy for our emerging CPA leaders, this article resonated  with me. While the notion of EQ as a critical leadership quality is on point, I think it must be in the context of how leadership is changing in this hyper-connected, rapidly changing world. When we asked our emerging leaders to compare and contrast leadership across the ages, they identified the common traits we all know - vision, communication, passion, and authority. Yet when looking at the current state, they added words like collaborative, transparent, more communication,.

 

These skills include the ability to engage and inspire followers to a shared vision and action. The other critical piece is to 'know themselves' in a way they can be that authentic leader with their own unique style rather than trying to fit some standard leadership model that forces them to change. We do this with Strengths-Finders and Values to help them become self-aware.

 

Thus I see the idea of EQ to include specific group dynamics, collaboration, listening, and making your thinking visible to others. These skills can be taught and developed and we are seeing emerging leaders  able to apply these as they grow into the kind of future leaders we will need.

Robin Martin's curator insight, July 4, 1:51 PM

Absolutely...however, students need to have the "grit'" and tenacity to survive as well as to thrive in this world. Some, if not most, of us Boomers learned this during our lifetimes, most likely the "hard way," so to speak.

 

Just being able to focus in the digital world for younger people (mainly younger children) has to be a challenge in itself! While the digital age is perfect for them to learn as quickly as their brains are moving, somewhere there has to be a delicate "balance" to keep them grounded. 

 

Yes, we do need to align the skill sets needed to survive and become great leaders with what we're teaching young children. I predict an education overhaul in the very near future! 

Marisol Araya Fonseca's curator insight, July 5, 12:28 PM

Bring the real life to the classroom to shorten the gab between the classroom and their future lives outside the classroom.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from The Daily Leadership Scoop
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The Leadership Freak Code of Leadership

The Leadership Freak Code of Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Leaders without a code follow the course of least resistance. Life becomes unstable, stressful, and frustrating. Leaders without guiding principles are undependable followers. 


Via Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN, John E Smith, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

People are not tools is a key point made. When we think they are, we become managers rather than combining managing and leading.

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Jean-Philippe D'HALLUIN's curator insight, June 30, 3:31 AM

From article : "Accept the fact that we have to treat almost anybody as a volunteer".

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Getting to the Change We Want: Developing an Easement Mindset

Getting to the Change We Want: Developing an Easement Mindset | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The following is also posted at stephenhurley.ca. I would love to hear whether this concept resonates with colleagues south of the border! The degree to which education systems in Canada (and elsew...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

What might be made of a meeting where teachers, administrators, parents, community members, and students were made to feel welcome? That is an incredible question.

 

For years, we had meetings of that nature. It stopped when the new School managers decided they knew the best way and there was only one way.

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Principles for Open Innovation and Open Leadingship

Principles for Open Innovation and Open Leadingship | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Just found this awesome 27 min talk by Joi Ito on the 9 principles of open innovation. They are not that new – first version appeared in 2012 – but they seem to have matured, like good wine in well...

Via Patrick Verdonk
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Is it really one thing over the other in the principles? For example, learning and education are not mutually exclusive. It might be argued that learning is subsumed into education which is a broader concept. Good theory and good practice work together, as well. Privileging one way of doing something is not corrected by reversing the privilege, but by understanding ways of integrating learning and education and the other principles. Moving from an either/or (binary) paradigm to one that is integrative and inclusive is important.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Kindergarten is Beary Fun
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How To Build Your Professional Learning Community - Edudemic

How To Build Your Professional Learning Community - Edudemic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Professional development used to mean one thing: inservice days. Oof. We sure have come a long way, haven’t we? Especially in the realm of connecting with other like-minded individuals around the globe. We’re no longer limited by what is offered geographically nearby, so we can get into what really interests us as educators, even if the expert is on the other side of the world, and our collaborators are scattered about and have never met in person. When you have a group of people who are interested in similar things as you and are collaborating,  sharing ideas, and offering encouragement, advice, and constructive criticism to the group, some real magic can happen!"


Via John Evans, Roger Francis, David Hain, Janice Comrie
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Community is a necessary and organic event in continuously learning. It takes us beyond simply connecting and into deeper relationships where we count on each other.

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Happy Teaching, Happy Learning: 13 Secrets to Finland's Success

Happy Teaching, Happy Learning: 13 Secrets to Finland's Success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When Sophia Faridi visited several schools in Finland, students and teachers seemed happier than students and teachers in the U.S.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The most interesting point is that personal time is highly valued. It is not just mouthed that people need time to rejuvenate. That makes us better able to meet the challenges we face in classrooms It is not just the next habit out of seven.

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Is this really how we should test reading development in kids?

Is this really how we should test reading development in kids? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A test that has been used since 2001 and given to millions of young students is critiqued.

Via Mel Riddile, Lepatriinu
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Educational managers and reformers are quite caught up in assigning a number to the learning children undertake. It makes more sense to make the learning enjoyable. Teaching is an invitational event which brings children into safe spaces where learning can happen.

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Courage Is The Key To Fearless Leadership - Lolly Daskal | Leadership and Personal Development

Courage Is The Key To Fearless Leadership - Lolly Daskal | Leadership and Personal Development | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

 

Wu Feng was a Manchurian diplomat in the 1700s who was posted with an aboriginal tribe in the outskirts of Taiwan.

He befriended the aboriginal chief, whose tribe beheaded one of its members every year as a form of sacrifice. Each year Wu Feng pleaded, with all his compassion and reverence for life, for the chief to put to an end to this custom. The chief would listen respectfully, then summon the chosen tribe member and without hesitation behead him.

Finally, after living with the tribe for 25 years, Wu Feng once more pleaded with the chief to stop the killing. But this time, when the tribe member was called forth, Wu Feng took his place and said, “If you will kill this time, it will be me.”.

The chief stared long into his old friend’s eyes. He could not kill him. And from that day, the practice of beheading stopped.


Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Courage is necessary in leading. Leading is about navigating, mapping, and continuously opening up new spaces. Teaching, when done well, is a hermeneutic experiencing in classroom settings where human beings are continuously forming.

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David Hain's curator insight, July 1, 11:12 AM

"Courage is not the absence of fear but the judgment that something else is more important than fear." @LollyDaskal

Don Cloud's curator insight, July 4, 9:51 AM

Only with courage is true leadership possible.

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Creating Personalized Learning Environments
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Student Autonomy

Student Autonomy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Empowering Students In the Classroom

 

When I think of change that needs to happen in Education, my immediate thought goes toward student autonomy. To be autonomous as a student is to be able to independently manage the freedom one has in the classroom, while maintaining a harmonious relationship with the teacher.

 

For a student to be autonomous, a student must realize:

They have a voiceTheir voice mattersIt will be heardIt will make a difference

 


Via Gust MEES, Silverback Learning
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Student autonomy happens with teacher autonomy. Gert Biesta proposes democracy happens in classrooms where it is lived and modeled. It is not a distant process. The word is not autonomy but emancipation which is responsible for the Other and the world we live in.

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Gust MEES's curator insight, June 30, 9:00 PM

This fits by 100% my meaning also!

When I think of change that needs to happen in Education, my immediate thought goes toward student autonomy. To be autonomous as a student is to be able to independently manage the freedom one has in the classroom, while maintaining a harmonious relationship with the teacher.

For a student to be autonomous, a student must realize:

  • They have a voice
  • Their voice matters
  • It will be heard
  • It will make a difference


Stevi Quate's curator insight, July 2, 9:28 AM

When John McDermott and I wrote Clock Watchers and The Just Right Challenge, we wrote about empowering students and captured similar ideas to this posting. Since these ideas aren't new and seem to be shared widely, I wonder why these ideas aren't the norm in classrooms that we watch.

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Instructional Agility 

Instructional Agility  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

By Tom Schimmer For an assessment to serve a truly formative purpose, it needs to cause some action by the teacher and students. In other words, the information gleaned must have the potential to i...


Via Chris Wejr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

All teaching and learning should be a verb and this includes assessing. Events are only nouns if we allow them to be. They end up as a point in time. Emmanuel Levinas used events to describe the continuous flow living assumes. Assessing is a hermeneutic process which involves navigating and mapping always new territory. We have never visited this point and event before and we cannot visit it again.

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Chris Wejr's curator insight, July 1, 12:03 PM
I love the idea of keeping formative assessment more as a verb (action) and less as a noun (event). Tom is a friend of mine and has been huge in my shift as an educator.
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Cultural Memory

Cultural Memory | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Humans have a form of externalised memory. They are able to transmit information across generations in the form of learned cultural traditions and preserve this knowledge in artefacts. How this cap...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Cultural memory is embedded and embodied within society. Perhaps one of the great challenges of contemporary times is teaching and learning what that means.

 

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What Students Do Better Than Teachers

What Students Do Better Than Teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

What Students Do Better Than Teachers


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Both Dewey and Whitehead commented that children live in the present and long-term goals are the work of adults.

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Leadership Advice & Tips
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#Leaders turn the spotlight on their teams

#Leaders turn the spotlight on their teams | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How To Be The Leader They've All Been Waiting For
Forbes
An old colleague and leadership expert used to relate a little parable about the great British prime ministers, William Gladstone and Benjamin Disraeli.

Via Mike Klintworth, John Michel, Patricia D. Sadar - Career and Leadership Acceleration Coach
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a lot of servant-leadership in this article. I thought about how often I heard School managers spoke using language that suggested ownership. For example, my School, my teachers, my leadership, etc as if they were the only ones who had a vision.

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Graeme Reid's curator insight, July 2, 8:41 PM

Leadership is about helping others shine.

Lisa McCarthy's curator insight, July 3, 7:01 AM

It takes maturity and humility and wisdom to grasp that oftentimes the best thing you can do with that spotlight is to put it on those around you, so that they blossom in ways they didn’t realize were possible … and so that your organization can benefit fully from their fully developed talents.

Patricia D. Sadar - Career and Leadership Acceleration Coach's curator insight, July 3, 9:39 AM

Wow, I absolutely love this article!

 

What a powerful message to remind us that leadership is not about us, it is about helping our teams shine. 

 

So today if the positive spotlight is turned on you, turn it back to the team and let them shine! 

 

What do you think?  Would love to learn from our experiences and observations....The SPOTLIGHT is on YOU:)

 

Until next time....PS - Live on Purpose!

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Creating a Respectful Classroom Environment

Creating a Respectful Classroom Environment | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“In our class: 1) everyone is allowed to feel they can work and learn in a safe and caring environment; 2) everyone learns about, understands, appreciates, and respects varied races, classes, genders, physical and mental abilities, and...

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching is about creating an environment where creativity and learning flourish. A key phenomenon is respect.

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The digital degree

The digital degree | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
FROM Oxford’s quads to Harvard Yard and many a steel and glass palace of higher education in between, exams are giving way to holidays. As students consider life...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

School at all levels has gone on without substantive change. We simply look to replace one palace with another as if education were binary and it were that simple.

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2020: Most Important Future Work Skills {Infographic} - Best Infographics

2020: Most Important Future Work Skills {Infographic} - Best Infographics | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Tweet Tweet Technology is changing the way we work. Our world is going to look a lot different in a couple of decades. All workers need to learn new skills and improving existing ones to stay in demand. This infographic covers the future of work and the skills required for workers to stay relevant: [Source: …

Via Thomas Faltin, Suvi Salo
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The Difference Between Praise and Feedback - Mind/Shift

The Difference Between Praise and Feedback - Mind/Shift | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Parenting these days is patrolled by the language police. Sometimes it seems like the worst thing you could ever say to a kid is “Good job!” or the dreaded, “Good girl!” Widely popularized psychological research warns about the “inverse power of praise” and the importance of “unconditional parenting.” What are these researchers really getting at? Are the particular words we use to talk to our kids so important? And how do we convey positive feelings without negative consequences?

Via John Evans, Lynnette Van Dyke, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Feedback is necessary in the growth of children and adults. Sometimes it is praise that is involved and other times it is about correction. Feedback is more than broad general statements about doing a good or bad job, but is specific to the task at hand. Pedagogues, parents and teachers alike, have to be aware that they are not manipulating when they use feedback. The feedback has to be directed towards growth and forming in the human being.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, July 3, 9:51 AM

Feedback needs to be practical and useful in order to actually help an individual improve. This takes effort but it shows you care. It is fine to incorporate praise in feedback as well as your perspective on specific areas of improvement. The goal is to inspire and motivate action based on careful observation.

 

Delivering good, valuable feedback takes time and practice. It can be a powerful and influential tool to motivate and inspire behavioral change.

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TCRecord: Article

TCRecord: Article | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Content and resources for the education researcher
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we use quantitative research we measure. We need to explore the experiences teachers experience in the classroom and their being and becoming a teacher. It is not a linear journey and each teacher has their particular journey to inform what it means being and becoming a teacher.

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the implications of meritocracy

the implications of meritocracy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Alain de Botton is currently my favourite philosopher. I find him fascinating to listen to (might be somewhat related to his lovely accent) and I enjoy reading his books. I've been watching some of...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Meritocracy is what we fall back onto to justify inequality. Someone always seemed privileged in a hierarchy. It is not so much that we turn away from meritocracy, democracy, and freedom, but understand the way the words are used in shackling people. Philosophers such as de Botton, Ranciere, Gadamer, Levinas, etc, provide a different insight into what we can do to bring about a world where meritocracy, democracy, and freedom are not just words, but events in people's lives.

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What will the classroom and curriculum of the future look like? | eSchool News | eSchool News

What will the classroom and curriculum of the future look like? | eSchool News | eSchool News | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What will the classroom and the curriculum of the future look like? What characteristics are important for students and teachers?
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is interesting to speculate and imagine about questions such as this. There likely is no set answer. What was interesting in the article was that bringing the world into the classroom is not a new idea and the teacher creating an inviting and communal space for learning. John Dewey was suggesting this 100 years ago.

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How to grow your creativity

How to grow your creativity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"I collected some thoughts and quotes for my writing students and thought I’d share them with you as well."


Via craig daniels
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The quotes gathered are excellent.

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Teaching & Learning - The Power of We - Magna Publications

Teaching & Learning - The Power of We - Magna Publications | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Being a college professor sometimes feels lonely. Yes, we have colleagues in our departments and elsewhere on campus, students in our classrooms, and administrators who support us, but we also spend a lot of time working by ourselves. As new faculty members, we decided that “the power of we” was important for enhancing pedagogical practice, and we thought that maybe the cycle of loneliness could be broken by a pedagogy group. What follows describes how we formed the group, what we have done together, and, most important, what we’ve gained from the experience. We’re not the first to tell this story, but our view is that, to paraphrase a famous thought, in a time of teaching to the test, erasing the barriers between student and teacher is a radical act.

 

 


Via Faculty Focus, Alfredo Calderon
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

If teaching at the college level is lonely, can you imagine how lonely it is to be a K-12 teacher? The structure is designed for separation and this separating is not overcome by wishing for cooperative work space and different structures in staff meetings. Those are just words and wishes.

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