Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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How Are Algorithms Used to Solve Problems?

How Are Algorithms Used to Solve Problems? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Algorithms are often used in mathematics and problem-solving. Learn more about what an algorithm is and how it compares to other problem-solving strategies.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are two articles with this. The other one is about Tevorsky's and Kahneman's work on heuristics.
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Active Learning: In Need of Deeper Exploration | Faculty Focus

Active Learning: In Need of Deeper Exploration | Faculty Focus | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Most of us think we know what active learning is. The word engagement quickly comes to mind. Or, we describe what it isn’t: passive learning. Definitions also abound. The one proposed by Bonwell and Eison in an early (and now classic) active learning monograph is widely referenced: involving “students in doing things and thinking about the things they are doing.” (p. 2)

Those are fine places to start, but as interest in active learning has grown—and with its value now firmly established empirically—what gets labeled as active learning continues to expand. Carr, Palmer, and Hagel recently wrote, “Active learning is a very broad concept that covers or is associated with a wide variety of learning strategies.” (p. 173) They list some strategies now considered to be active learning. I’ve added a few more: experiential learning; learning by doing (hands-on learning); applied learning; service learning; peer teaching (in various contexts); lab work; role plays; case-based learning; group work of various kinds; technology-based strategies such as simulations, games, clickers, and various smart phone applications; and classroom interaction, with participation and discussion probably being the most widely used of all active learning approaches. Beyond strategies are theories such as constructivism that have spun off collections of student-centered approaches that promote student autonomy, self-direction, and self-regulation of learning.

What qualifies as active learning remains largely unchallenged. An example of why that’s an issue has become clear in the lecture vs. active learning debate. By comparison, lecture is a much more discrete, observable thing. If we stand active learning up against it, then we’ve got a crate of fruit—oranges, bananas, pears, peaches, and grapes—laid out opposite an apple. That makes comparisons and contrasts difficult.

Beyond figuring out how and where the strategies and approaches belong in the active learning domain, is the mostly absent critical analysis of which ones are best. Let’s not imagine a definitively right answer here, but more a sorting of the options with some guidelines that might allow us to determine what strategies fit well with what kinds of content, and what approaches promote learning most effectively for which students.


Via Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a difference between active learning and deep learning. David Jardine writes about learning that is worthwhile. It is when learning is worth whiling over and enjoying. Teachers and students go deeper and move beyond the superficial.
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Newton’s New Law of Teaching: When Quality Instruction and Technology Intersect

Newton’s New Law of Teaching: When Quality Instruction and Technology Intersect | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Both of these variables—good teachers and good technology—can transform a student’s learning experience. Each of them are also compromised by the absence of the other. The holy grail of instruction, then, seems to reside in the space occupied by teachers who know their content, know their kids, and know how to weave powerful technology into their instruction.

Via Nik Peachey, Faten Romdhani, Alfredo Calderón
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
“Good teachers put snags in the river  of children passing by, and over the years they redirect hundreds of lives.” (Tracy Kidder).

I think of the word "good" in an Aristotlean manner. Good is never complete and has ethical and practical implications for teachers.
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Jennifer Osborne's curator insight, March 17, 2016 5:56 PM

Can't argue with that. Or can you?

Kelly Hammond's curator insight, March 21, 2016 9:00 AM

Can't argue with that. Or can you?

Stephania Savva, Ph.D's curator insight, April 4, 2016 11:03 AM

Can't argue with that. Or can you?

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We all can be part of effort to help Detroit school kids

We all can be part of effort to help Detroit school kids | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A strong country relies on an educated populace with access and expertise to sophisticated technology

 

Connecting donors directly to teachers in Detroit schools who have no money for supplies.


Via june holley
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I think this applies to schools in Canada to various degrees, as well. Schools are not created equal. As well, teachers answer to managers at all levels who are no longer in the classroom and, in some cases, did not want to be in the classroom.
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MarkDilley's curator insight, March 14, 2016 12:24 PM
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MzTeachuh: April is Poetry Month--Here's A Headstart

MzTeachuh: April is Poetry Month--Here's A Headstart | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
1. National Poetry Month Is Here Again! http://www.poetryfoundation.org/harriet/2013/04/national-poetry-month-is-here-again/ 2. Celebrate National Poetry Month with FREE POETRY!
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I enjoy teaching poetry. I used to tell students that it helps understand the power of choosing the proper word and the silence to discover meaning.

I once heard a keynote presenter suggest that when we do not explain to students the reaons they are learning something it is a waste time. Good teachers explain and provide examples for students. This would be lost on a keynote speaker who was at best a mediocre teacher the few years he was in a classroom.
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How to share your ways of learning with students

How to share your ways of learning with students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Teachers who love their teaching profession have a lot of passion for learning as well as teaching. It always thrills them when they are given a challenge of teaching most stubborn students. Many of them have given up their high paying jobs in order to pursue teaching profession. They always... https://www.allassignmenthelp.co.uk/blog/how-to-share-your-ways-of-learning-with-students/
Via Lucy White, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I once told a group of teachers I would teach for 1/2 the price. I was the least popular teacher in that room. Teaching is about passion and compassion. When we love something, we want to share it with others, hence the "com" in compassion.
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What Google Learned From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team

What Google Learned From Its Quest to Build the Perfect Team | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Our data-saturated age enables us to examine our work habits and office quirks with a scrutiny that our cubicle-bound forebears could only dream of. Today, on corporate campuses and within university laboratories, psychologists, sociologists and statisticians are devoting themselves to studying everything from team composition to email patterns in order to figure out how to make employees into faster, better and more productive versions of themselves. ‘‘We’re living through a golden age of understanding personal productivity,’’ says Marshall Van Alstyne, a research scientist at M.I.T. who studies how people share information. ‘‘All of a sudden, we can pick apart the small choices that all of us make, decisions most of us don’t even notice, and figure out why some people are so much more effective than everyone else.’’

Yet many of today’s most valuable firms have come to realize that analyzing and improving individual workers ­— a practice known as ‘‘employee performance optimization’’ — isn’t enough. As commerce becomes increasingly global and complex, the bulk of modern work is more and more team-based. One study, published in The Harvard Business Review last month, found that ‘‘the time spent by managers and employees in collaborative activities has ballooned by 50 percent or more’’ over the last two decades and that, at many companies, more than three-quarters of an employee’s day is spent communicating with colleagues

Via Cheryl Frose
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The word team is not synonomous with community. Team has more structure. Look at the graphic. Having coached hockey for 30 plus years, my goal was to have community form. I am always amazed with how much players stay in touch from many of the teams, despite having only played together with each other for 1 - 2 years. One player told me that it was that team that allowed him to form lasting friendships he would not have otherwise formed.

The same thing applied in my classrooms. Community is not perfect, but it is how people hold things in common and communicate what they share in common.
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What’s causing ADHD to skyrocket in kids?

What’s causing ADHD to skyrocket in kids? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

 "In 2003, 7.8% of 4- to 17-year-olds in the US were were diagnosed with ADHD, according to the National Survey of Children’s Health. By 2011, that figure had reached 11% of students, with 20% of high-school boys diagnosed with the condition.

Explanations for the dramatic spike in ADHD cases range from increased awareness of the condition and improvements in how it is diagnosed, to the bottom-line bonanza for pharmaceutical companies and kids looking for pharmacological help to focus on standardized tests. Or it could be that the increase in school-accountability measures has led low-performing schools to identify more ADHD students to get more funding (pdf).

Jeffrey P. Brosco, a doctor and a professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has another theory: he thinks the dramatic rise in academic standards since the 1970s may be responsible."


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Giving children a break and not pressing them to hard is important. Children need to learn how to just enjoy going slow per Carl Honore's In Praise of Slowness.
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Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s ban elementary homework

Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s ban elementary homework | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Homework does have an impact on young students — but it’s not a good one
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
All learning shoudl be meaningful. Teaching is about creating an environment where students can learn in their particular way. It is about the relationality that can make learning meaningful, because it involves someone teaching someone.

We need to be careful this is not taken up as the next big change in schools and as another way to make teachers feel like they come up short.
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Guest Post – Leaders vs. Managers: 17 Traits That Set Them Apart

Guest Post –  Leaders vs. Managers: 17 Traits That Set Them Apart | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here's a great infographic and guest post on the difference between leaders and managers.  I am a strong believer that these are two different skills different sides of the same coin, and that we need both in order to be successful. Guest Post - Leaders V Managers: 17 Traits That Set Them Apart Let’s set [...]
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am not convinced that leaders sell followers. They inspire followers by doing what is proper which has an ethical and practical orientation to it. However, outside of that the graphic is workable.
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nikolay's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:03 AM
I am not convinced that leaders sell followers. They inspire followers by doing what is proper which has an ethical and practical orientation to it. However, outside of that the graphic is workable.
Roscoe54's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:28 AM
I am not convinced that leaders sell followers. They inspire followers by doing what is proper which has an ethical and practical orientation to it. However, outside of that the graphic is workable.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 9:48 AM
I am not convinced that leaders sell followers. They inspire followers by doing what is proper which has an ethical and practical orientation to it. However, outside of that the graphic is workable.
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#Leadership What Makes a Great Leader?

#Leadership What Makes a Great Leader? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

We know that leadership matters - but what are the personal characteristics that separate the average leader from the great leader? What makes remarkable leaders tick?


Via Begoña Pabón, Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

This is an interesting article with embedded links that can be further explored. In an era where we mistake management for leadership and 140 characters for something meaningful, this is a worthwhile article.

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 7, 2016 12:01 PM

Las habilidades que separan a un lider de un gran lider se relacionan siempre con los valores y la esencia de dichos lideres y una sensibilidad adecuada hacia las personas de las que se rodea

nikolay's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:03 AM

This is an interesting article with embedded links that can be further explored. In an era where we mistake management for leadership and 140 characters for something meaningful, this is a worthwhile article.

Virginia Katsimpiri's curator insight, March 9, 2016 6:08 AM

This is an interesting article with embedded links that can be further explored. In an era where we mistake management for leadership and 140 characters for something meaningful, this is a worthwhile article.

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Rejecting Charter Takeover of Public Schools: A Reader

The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC) has been documenting the rise of advocacy for charter takeover of public schools in South Carolina, paralleling a similar pattern in nearby states such as Georgia and North Carolina. See March 13 rally to oppose private takeovers of public schools and Push for charter takeover of failing schools comes to South…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Although American in nature, the links are helpful can be helpful when it comes to understanding the neo-liberal and capitalist agendas that drive schools.
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How Radical Must We Be?

How Radical Must We Be? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Please pass this on to political candidates and fellow teachers. Treehorn joins the author to ask......    How Radical Must We Be To Get the Schools Our Children Deserve? United Opt Out Musings by Steven Singer, Member of the BAT Leadership Team originally published on his blog:  https://gadflyonthewallblog.wordpress.com/2016/02/28/how-radical-must-we-be-to-get-the-schools-our-children-deserve-united-opt-out-musings/ There was a point during Chris Hedges keynote…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I understand teaching as a calling. It is a vocation in the sense that it gives me voice and I express who I am through it in a creative sense. Radical is a return to one's roots, their deepest being and what they care for deeply. What we need is to move beyond (transform) schooling rather than just shuffle things around (reform). That suggests we need to go back to the roots of what we think schooling is for and what calls us to teaching.
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Philosophy as Food for Life

Philosophy as Food for Life | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Camus saw in Sisyphus

Via Pavel Barta
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Derrida wrote about teaching and philosophy in Who is Afraid of Philosophy. The article makes excellent points about not being in control of our fate, but being to respond to the world. Philosophy helps us in these responses.
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Pavel Barta's curator insight, March 11, 2016 8:42 AM
From inside "...we may not always be in control of our destiny. In other words, we are not the masters of our fate. On the other hand, we are largely in control of our response to it."
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Education Readings March 11th

Education Readings March 11th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz What Is a Large Effect Size? Anyone familiar with John Hattie’s ‘research’ will have come across the phrase ‘effect size.’ This article explains what this means and in the process fires a few shots at…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are several good articles linked here. One of note is the one about keeping music in our schools. This can be extended to art, phys ed, food sciences, etc. I found students loved those classes where creativity and interaction were emphasized.
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Famous Advice on Writing: The Collected Wisdom of Great Writers :: Maria Popova

Famous Advice on Writing: The Collected Wisdom of Great Writers :: Maria Popova | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By popular demand, I’ve put together a periodically updated reading list of all the famous advice on writing presented here over the years, featuring words of wisdom from such masters of the craft as Kurt Vonnegut, Susan Sontag, Henry Miller, Stephen King, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Susan Orlean, Ernest Hemingway, Zadie Smith, and more.

Please enjoy.

Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Annie Dillard, Anne Lamott, Charles Bukowski, Mary Oliver, Leonard Cohen, etc. What a list. I would include Wendell Berry and David Whyte.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 10, 2016 1:59 PM

Because writing is pretty darned close to magic.

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leading and learning: Education Review Office School Evaluation and some better Criteria for a 21st classroom.

leading and learning: Education Review Office School Evaluation and some better Criteria for a 21st classroom. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
. Schools are currently working their way through Education Review Office Frameworks and Evaluation Indicators for their School Charters.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"If not just another task devised by technocrats who have forgotten what it is like to face up to the reality of school leadership and classroom teaching." This extends to school managers in the schools.

For the last 8-10 years, I experienced administrators who had left the classroom years before and others who had little experience in the classroom. Teaching was something technical, rather than relational to these people.
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Most literate nation in the world? Not the U.S., new ranking says.

Most literate nation in the world? Not the U.S., new ranking says. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It isn't even in the top five.

Via Sinikka Laakio-Whybrow, Aki Puustinen, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is an interesting ranking. Canada is #11, not even in the top ten.
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Konstantinos Kalemis's curator insight, March 11, 2016 12:14 PM

It isn't even in the top five.

Dennis Swender's curator insight, March 13, 2016 9:44 AM

It isn't even in the top five.

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, March 16, 2016 7:21 AM

It isn't even in the top five.

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When You Feel Lost in Creative Work & Business

When You Feel Lost in Creative Work & Business | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When it comes to my creative projects and my business enterprises, it took me a long time to realize there was no shame in asking for directions.
Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Sometimes it is OK to be lost. It is in those moments that the unexpected can show itself.
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Stop Innovating in Schools. Please.

Stop Innovating in Schools. Please. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Too often when we talk about “innovation” in education, we point to that new set of Chromebooks or those shiny new Smartboards as examples of our efforts to change what we do in the classroom. That is, after all, what “innovation” is all about, to “make changes in something established, especially by introducing new methods, ideas, or products.” Over the last few years, many schools in the developed world have done a pretty good job on the new products front, earning billions of dollars for vendors who sell their gadgets or code under the guise of “innovation” of some degree or another. We’ve definitely got more stuff. And it’s arguable that our methods are changing, even if just a bit; the Maker Movement in schools, when fully embraced, is one such example of shifting roles in the classroom.

But on balance, is all of this “innovation” really changing us?

Not so much. Our efforts at innovating, regardless of method, idea, or product, have been focused far too much on incrementally improving the centuries old structures and practices we employ in schools, not on fundamentally rethinking them. And the vast majority of “innovation” I’ve seen in my visits to schools around the world doesn’t amount to much change at all in the area where we need it most: using those new methods, ideas, or products to shift agency for learning to the learner. To put it simply, innovation in schools today is far too focused on improving teaching, not amplifying learning.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I would take Will Richardson's key highlight and put teacher in place of where the word student appears. It does not mean that students are not important, they are, but teachers are often forgotten in this conversation.
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The mesmerizing, attention-grabbing power of silence

The mesmerizing, attention-grabbing power of silence | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I catch myself droning on in class. Do you? Pause and let it all sink in. Your students will thank you.

Via Chris Carter, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
  It is in the quiet spaces that silence provides that meaning are made. It is in thsoe meditative spaces that we make sense of what has been at the center of the conversation and new questions emerge.
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Chris Carter's curator insight, March 7, 2016 7:51 PM
W
Why am I thinking of Simon and Garfunkle?
 
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 7, 2016 8:17 PM
W
Why am I thinking of Simon and Garfunkle?
 
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 10:01 AM
W
Why am I thinking of Simon and Garfunkle?
 
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Standards, Grades And Tests Are Wildly Outdated, Argues 'End Of Average'

Standards, Grades And Tests Are Wildly Outdated, Argues 'End Of Average' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A Harvard faculty member argues in his new book that averages tell us nothing useful about individuals. That has big implications for schools.

Via Parent Cortical Mass, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
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Tony Meehan's curator insight, March 6, 2016 6:18 AM

Really interesting interview about the challenges of moving away from a system of assessment which is based around average test scores, levels, grades etc.


He talks about, "rethinking the architecture of school systems. In most states, people have put on the books goals about meeting every kid where they're at. Even the "Every Student Succeeds" [ESSA, the new federal law] approach is based on the assumption that we're meeting each kid where they're at, to give them what they need to be successful."


 


The shift away from levelling and grading is inexorable.  Does anybody in education really believe we should return to such a reductionist, morale sapping approach to assessing learners?


 

Geoffrey Grant's curator insight, March 7, 2016 11:59 PM
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 9:49 AM
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
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How teachers find out about how students learn - TeachingHOW2s

How teachers find out about how students learn - TeachingHOW2s | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Dr Yana Weinstein is an assistant professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Massachusetts. We met on Twitter and decided to collaborate on the results of her questionnaire. But how? I’d only recently discovered BoardThing — an online collaborative tool based on a virtual whiteboard and sticky notes — and found it perfect for our purposes. While there is a chat function on the app, we used Skype simultaneously for even better results.

The first thing we did was co-create a concept map of the way data changes from raw data to appearing in journal, blogs and books.

Then we went back and forth discussing, creating and amending the visuals. 

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
How teachers find out what how students learn integrates theoretical and practical components. It is important to understand curriculum and teaching as complicated conversations that integrate the two.
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 10:17 AM
How teachers find out what how students learn integrates theoretical and practical components. It is important to understand curriculum and teaching as complicated conversations that integrate the two.
Carlos Vázquez's curator insight, March 8, 2016 10:44 PM
Share your insight
Virginia Katsimpiri's curator insight, March 9, 2016 6:08 AM
How teachers find out what how students learn integrates theoretical and practical components. It is important to understand curriculum and teaching as complicated conversations that integrate the two.
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Using systems for creativity diminishes your ability to experience it

Using systems for creativity diminishes your ability to experience it | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Using systems for creativity diminishes your ability to experience it...


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When we speak about systems as if humans do not exist, we create ideologies and creativity, which is a human act, is diminished.
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Education : Reform or Transform? Sir Ted.

Education : Reform or Transform?    Sir Ted. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Greetings from Treehorn, the little fella.... Not in Australia, Sir Ken.  We STANDARDISE. We NAPLAN children. We aim for wholesale mediocrity according to Murdoch. ______________________________________________________________ Phil Cullen  41 Cominan Avenue  Banora Point  Australia 2486  07 5524 6443   cphilcullen@bigpond.com             http://primaryschooling.net/                     http://qldprimaryprincipals.wordpress.com/ 07 5524 6443          0407865999
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Transform means to go beyond where we are. It does not mean just doing what we are told. As teachers, we act and speak in ethical, practical, and situational contexts with children who have real names, faces, and stories. Our pedagogy is guided by the reality we experience in each moment.
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