Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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What’s causing ADHD to skyrocket in kids?

What’s causing ADHD to skyrocket in kids? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

 "In 2003, 7.8% of 4- to 17-year-olds in the US were were diagnosed with ADHD, according to the National Survey of Children’s Health. By 2011, that figure had reached 11% of students, with 20% of high-school boys diagnosed with the condition.

Explanations for the dramatic spike in ADHD cases range from increased awareness of the condition and improvements in how it is diagnosed, to the bottom-line bonanza for pharmaceutical companies and kids looking for pharmacological help to focus on standardized tests. Or it could be that the increase in school-accountability measures has led low-performing schools to identify more ADHD students to get more funding (pdf).

Jeffrey P. Brosco, a doctor and a professor of clinical pediatrics at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has another theory: he thinks the dramatic rise in academic standards since the 1970s may be responsible."


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Giving children a break and not pressing them to hard is important. Children need to learn how to just enjoy going slow per Carl Honore's In Praise of Slowness.
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Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s ban elementary homework

Homework is wrecking our kids: The research is clear, let’s ban elementary homework | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Homework does have an impact on young students — but it’s not a good one
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
All learning shoudl be meaningful. Teaching is about creating an environment where students can learn in their particular way. It is about the relationality that can make learning meaningful, because it involves someone teaching someone.

We need to be careful this is not taken up as the next big change in schools and as another way to make teachers feel like they come up short.
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Guest Post – Leaders vs. Managers: 17 Traits That Set Them Apart

Guest Post –  Leaders vs. Managers: 17 Traits That Set Them Apart | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here's a great infographic and guest post on the difference between leaders and managers.  I am a strong believer that these are two different skills different sides of the same coin, and that we need both in order to be successful. Guest Post - Leaders V Managers: 17 Traits That Set Them Apart Let’s set [...]
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I am not convinced that leaders sell followers. They inspire followers by doing what is proper which has an ethical and practical orientation to it. However, outside of that the graphic is workable.
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nikolay's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:03 AM
I am not convinced that leaders sell followers. They inspire followers by doing what is proper which has an ethical and practical orientation to it. However, outside of that the graphic is workable.
Roscoe54's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:28 AM
I am not convinced that leaders sell followers. They inspire followers by doing what is proper which has an ethical and practical orientation to it. However, outside of that the graphic is workable.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 9:48 AM
I am not convinced that leaders sell followers. They inspire followers by doing what is proper which has an ethical and practical orientation to it. However, outside of that the graphic is workable.
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#Leadership What Makes a Great Leader?

#Leadership What Makes a Great Leader? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

We know that leadership matters - but what are the personal characteristics that separate the average leader from the great leader? What makes remarkable leaders tick?


Via Begoña Pabón, Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting article with embedded links that can be further explored. In an era where we mistake management for leadership and 140 characters for something meaningful, this is a worthwhile article.

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Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 7, 2016 12:01 PM

Las habilidades que separan a un lider de un gran lider se relacionan siempre con los valores y la esencia de dichos lideres y una sensibilidad adecuada hacia las personas de las que se rodea

nikolay's curator insight, March 8, 2016 1:03 AM

This is an interesting article with embedded links that can be further explored. In an era where we mistake management for leadership and 140 characters for something meaningful, this is a worthwhile article.

Virginia Katsimpiri's curator insight, March 9, 2016 6:08 AM

This is an interesting article with embedded links that can be further explored. In an era where we mistake management for leadership and 140 characters for something meaningful, this is a worthwhile article.

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Rejecting Charter Takeover of Public Schools: A Reader

The Post and Courier (Charleston, SC) has been documenting the rise of advocacy for charter takeover of public schools in South Carolina, paralleling a similar pattern in nearby states such as Georgia and North Carolina. See March 13 rally to oppose private takeovers of public schools and Push for charter takeover of failing schools comes to South…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Although American in nature, the links are helpful can be helpful when it comes to understanding the neo-liberal and capitalist agendas that drive schools.
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How Radical Must We Be?

How Radical Must We Be? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Please pass this on to political candidates and fellow teachers. Treehorn joins the author to ask......    How Radical Must We Be To Get the Schools Our Children Deserve? United Opt Out Musings by Steven Singer, Member of the BAT Leadership Team originally published on his blog:  https://gadflyonthewallblog.wordpress.com/2016/02/28/how-radical-must-we-be-to-get-the-schools-our-children-deserve-united-opt-out-musings/ There was a point during Chris Hedges keynote…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I understand teaching as a calling. It is a vocation in the sense that it gives me voice and I express who I am through it in a creative sense. Radical is a return to one's roots, their deepest being and what they care for deeply. What we need is to move beyond (transform) schooling rather than just shuffle things around (reform). That suggests we need to go back to the roots of what we think schooling is for and what calls us to teaching.
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leading and learning: Creative teaching readings .Down with algebra? Educational myths.

leading and learning: Creative teaching readings .Down with algebra? Educational myths. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Does Algebra Get in the Way of Student Success?/ Down With Algebra II!
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Andy Hargreaves' article about the decline of Swedish education is worth a read.
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Geoffrey Grant's curator insight, March 4, 2016 10:23 PM
Andy Hargreaves' article about the decline of Swedish education is worth a read.
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Firms are failing millennials by ignoring their leadership needs

Firms are failing millennials by ignoring their leadership needs | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Research from Deloitte this week revealed some worrying trends in how UK businesses view their leadership pipeline.

Via Anne Leong, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The line about producing leaders points to a troubling way of understanding leadership. We believe we have a template that produces the right qualities. Like teaching, leading is an on-the-job forming and transforming who we are as we inform who we are becoming.
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Part Two: A Community Organizer’s Definition Of Leadership – How Can It Be Applied To Education?

Part Two:  A Community Organizer’s Definition Of Leadership – How Can It Be Applied To Education? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I previously posted Part One in this two-part series on what qualities many community organizers view as important to leaders. These two-parts are edited versions of the first chapter of a Masters ...
Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There is a part one to this. Taking risks, humility, memory, etc are important features of leadership in community organizing and education.
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What 7 principals wish they knew their first day on the job

What 7 principals wish they knew their first day on the job | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
News, voices and jobs for education professionals. Optimized for your mobile phone.
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
What is intriguing is that principals do not turn to the teachers, who often have great insights into what is happening on the ground in schools.,
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 3, 2016 10:49 AM
What is intriguing is that principals do not turn to the teachers, who often have great insights into what is happening on the ground in schools.,
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Students Shouldn’t Have to Choose Between Books and Food

Students Shouldn’t Have to Choose Between Books and Food | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Low-income students know that education is vital to improving their lives. Colleges must provide the support services they need.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
But, they do have to. Like health care, education is a place bureaucrats and politicians target with their cuts.
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leading and learning: Sir Ken Robinson Will Richardson, Tony Wagner and others challenge teachers to move beyond the GERM 'new normal'.

leading and learning: Sir Ken Robinson Will Richardson, Tony Wagner and others challenge teachers to move beyond the GERM 'new normal'. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Challenging the Ministry imposed 'new normal' - there is an alternative! I caught up with a respected old colleague ( who is still working) and asked him for his thoughts.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Creativity is not a given in a compliant educational sector where instrumental language replaces the relational leadership and language that is so vital from teachers. The Focault quote is an important aspect of the post.
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Rob Cady's curator insight, March 3, 2016 12:11 AM
Creativity is not a given in a compliant educational sector where instrumental language replaces the relational leadership and language that is so vital from teachers. The Focault quote is an important aspect of the post.
Simon Thomas's curator insight, March 3, 2016 3:10 AM
Creativity is not a given in a compliant educational sector where instrumental language replaces the relational leadership and language that is so vital from teachers. The Focault quote is an important aspect of the post.
Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 3, 2016 6:59 AM
Creativity is not a given in a compliant educational sector where instrumental language replaces the relational leadership and language that is so vital from teachers. The Focault quote is an important aspect of the post.
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University of Connecticut Professor Warns of Similarities Between Charter School Growth And The Subprime Mortgage Crisis // UConn Today

University of Connecticut Professor Warns of Similarities Between Charter School Growth And The Subprime Mortgage Crisis // UConn Today | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

By Colin Poitras


"When charter schools first appeared in the U.S. in the early 1990s, they were seen as an exciting alternate choice for families looking to move their children out of low-performing urban schools.


Still widely popular, charter schools have become a major part of the nation’s educational infrastructure, expanding at a rate of about 12 percent a year. Nearly three million children, or about six percent of all children enrolled in public schools nationwide, currently attend charter schools.


But with states facing mounting pressure to ease regulations to allow more charter schools, and with the federal government and private industry offering millions of dollars in new charter school grants and incentives, UConn professor of educational leadership and law Preston Green III is urging policymakers to be careful.


In a recent paper that is receiving national attention, Green and three co-authors outline the many parallels they see between today’s charter school systems and the early days of the subprime mortgage crisis, where aggressive business practices and unchecked growth created a national housing ‘bubble’ that threw the country into deep recession.


The housing bubble was particularly devastating to urban African-American families, many of whom relied on subprime mortgages to purchase their first homes. Without sufficient regulatory safeguards in place to protect them, these vulnerable families would later lose their properties to foreclosure when the ‘bubble’ burst and they were unable to meet the terms of their loans.


When it comes to charter schools, Green, the John and Carla Klein Professor of Urban Education in UConn’s Neag School of Education, is concerned that, as with the subprime crisis, insufficient regulation could result in the formation of charter school “bubbles”: a concentration of poorly performing schools in urban African-American communities.


Green is a leading scholar in the fields of law and urban education, educational policy, and educational equity, with a focus on the legal and policy issues pertaining to educational access, school choice and charter schools.


“Charter school bubbles are most likely to form in black urban communities, because those are the communities where there is the greatest anger toward traditional public schools and the wish for change,” says Green. “It is because of that anger that these communities are most at risk of making an over-commitment to charter schools, which could then lead to the bubble we reference.”


As the lead author of the paper, “Are We Heading Toward a Charter School ‘Bubble’?: Lessons from the Subprime Mortgage Crisis,” Green advances a detailed and heavily annotated argument expressing his concerns. He is joined by research co-authors from Rutgers University, Montclair State University, and the University of Wisconsin at Madison.


The paper has sparked a national conversation. Since it first appeared online in December, the paper has been reported in journalist Jennifer Berkshire’s widely-read EduShyster blog, the Washington Post, Mother Jones, Salon, NEA Today, and a host of other online media sites, blogs, and podcasts. Critics say the paper’s comparisons are unreasonably provocative. Others support its conclusions as timely and important.


“I knew it was going to be controversial, but I felt it was something that needed to be said,” Green says. “I am very concerned with where charter schools are headed. We are in a position of repeating the mistakes that we made with subprime mortgages, where we encouraged ostensibly positive goals, but didn’t put the protections in place that are needed.”


Critics of charter schools often point to individual schools and districts where problems have surfaced. Green’s paper focuses instead on larger systemic issues. The authors point out that more than $200 million in charter school fraud, abuse, and mismanagement has been identified in 15 states. Reports of private for-profit charter school management companies declining to enroll students with special needs and disabilities, instituting aggressive disciplinary practices, charging public school districts exorbitant rent for facilities, and using high-pressure tactics to recruit students in minority neighborhoods, are additional cause for concern, Green points out in the paper.


“If we’re going to have private entities involved in public education, we need to have sufficient regulation, because without those regulations, without that oversight, there could be systemic abuse,” he says. “And because of the particular issues within urban communities, the failure of providing safeguards and regulations could result in a very negative situation.”


Multiple Authorizers, Multiple Problems

One of Green’s primary concerns is the recent push by the charter school industry for states to allow multiple independent authorizers of charter schools. Advocates argue that having multiple authorizers would make the application process more efficient, and offer more options for national providers interested in opening charter schools. But Green counters that having multiple authorizers opens the door for “authorizer hopping,” where low-performing providers could go searching for a favorable authorizer that won’t be as careful screening for quality or as demanding when it comes to accountability.


Recent federal laws, such as the Every Student Succeeds Act, encourage charter school expansion, adding another element to the charter school authorization debate. In the private sector, major entities like Netflix and the Walton Family Foundation, have pledged millions of dollars in support of charter school growth.


Traditionally, charter schools have been authorized by local public school districts. Those districts have demanded quality and accountability because they are responsible for educating all students in their community and would bear the brunt of educating students returning to their district should charter schools close. Shifting authorization to independent authorizers, Green says, means handing over that authority to an outside entity that doesn’t have a stake in the game.


“If you are going to have these private entities and use these private approaches, you cannot forget the public role in this,” he says. “Under state constitutional law, governments are supposed to provide a system of public education that ensures safeguards are in place.”


According to the Center for Education Reform, states with multiple school authorizers have nearly three and a half times as many charter schools as those authorized by local school districts. A separate study cited in the paper, this one by Stanford University’s Center for Research on Education Outcomes, found that “states with multiple authorizers experienced significantly lower growth in academic learning in their charter school students,” indicating that some charter school operators were successful in choosing the least rigorous option to provide oversight.

Charter schools already outnumber public schools in some districts. The Recovery School District in Louisiana, for example, is considered the first all-charter school district in the country. In Detroit, 14 entities that are not locally controlled have the power to open and close schools.


“What I get most concerned about is a situation where you have an all-charter school district where the authorizers, the entities that make decisions about what schools are going to come into play, are not connected with that school district,” Green says. “If you have a situation where the vast majority of decision-makers are not connected to the community, then you have a problem.”


In the paper, Green lays out his concerns clearly: “Charter school boards have the responsibility … to ensure that their schools follow all applicable laws, and that the schools spend public funds in a fiscally accountable manner. By contrast, for-profit [management entities] have the incentive to increase their revenues or cut expenses in ways that may contradict the goals of charter school boards.”


Subprime Similarities

Green compares the shift in charter school authorization to the start of the subprime crisis, where the federal government, seeking to increase homeownership for minorities and the poor, deregulated the financial industry and encouraged the distribution of subprime loans.


Traditionally, mortgage originators such as banks screened loans carefully, because they assumed all of the risk if the loan went into default. When the subprime industry emerged, banks and other mortgage originators no longer screened loans as closely, because the loans were guaranteed by the federal government and they were allowed to sell them on a secondary market, spreading out the risk. In essence, the originators of the mortgages no longer had any skin in the game.


Despite all of his concerns, Green remains a believer in the charter school concept. He insists that the paper he authored is not meant to be an attack on charter schools, but rather an exposé highlighting issues of concern.


Green believes the country right now is at “ground zero” with respect to the growth of charter school bubbles. The paper concludes with a series of recommendations for greater federal and state oversight, including more transparency in charter school approvals, improved quality assurance, and sanctions against schools that exercise low standards.


“What we are saying is that there should be a deliberative and thoughtful process in overseeing charter schools to make sure that the choices of parents and children are honored and, in the end, meaningful,” he says.


The flip side of that scenario is daunting. “If charter schools aren’t sufficiently regulated,” Green says, “we could see a proliferation of poorly monitored schools in these communities. The proliferation of these poorly regulated schools could gather such momentum that it could be a while before people start to realize there are problems, and by then, it will take some time to dismantle all that.”

Just like what happened in the subprime mortgage crisis.


The paper – “Are We Heading Toward a Charter School ‘Bubble’ ?: Lessons from the Subprime Mortgage Crisis” – is scheduled for publication in print in the University of Richmond Law Review next month.


http://today.uconn.edu/2016/02/a-charter-school-warning/




Via Roxana Marachi, PhD, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is an interesting parallel. The key point is that vulnerable populations are most at risk and greed drives a lot.
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The mesmerizing, attention-grabbing power of silence

The mesmerizing, attention-grabbing power of silence | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I catch myself droning on in class. Do you? Pause and let it all sink in. Your students will thank you.

Via Chris Carter, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
  It is in the quiet spaces that silence provides that meaning are made. It is in thsoe meditative spaces that we make sense of what has been at the center of the conversation and new questions emerge.
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Chris Carter's curator insight, March 7, 2016 7:51 PM
W
Why am I thinking of Simon and Garfunkle?
 
Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks's curator insight, March 7, 2016 8:17 PM
W
Why am I thinking of Simon and Garfunkle?
 
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 10:01 AM
W
Why am I thinking of Simon and Garfunkle?
 
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Standards, Grades And Tests Are Wildly Outdated, Argues 'End Of Average'

Standards, Grades And Tests Are Wildly Outdated, Argues 'End Of Average' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A Harvard faculty member argues in his new book that averages tell us nothing useful about individuals. That has big implications for schools.

Via Parent Cortical Mass, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
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Tony Meehan's curator insight, March 6, 2016 6:18 AM

Really interesting interview about the challenges of moving away from a system of assessment which is based around average test scores, levels, grades etc.


He talks about, "rethinking the architecture of school systems. In most states, people have put on the books goals about meeting every kid where they're at. Even the "Every Student Succeeds" [ESSA, the new federal law] approach is based on the assumption that we're meeting each kid where they're at, to give them what they need to be successful."


 


The shift away from levelling and grading is inexorable.  Does anybody in education really believe we should return to such a reductionist, morale sapping approach to assessing learners?


 

Geoffrey Grant's curator insight, March 7, 2016 11:59 PM
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 9:49 AM
This has been the case for some time. We adopted "gradeless report cards" about 15 years ago. We used that term as the powers to be could not get their heads around the term narrative report cards. The ideas was that we could share with students and parents in a more qualitative and helpful way how students were doing.

What was intriguing was after all the groundwork we did in our little corner of the universe how little credit we were given. Instead, it was given to others who just copied what we did.
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How teachers find out about how students learn - TeachingHOW2s

How teachers find out about how students learn - TeachingHOW2s | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Dr Yana Weinstein is an assistant professor of cognitive psychology at the University of Massachusetts. We met on Twitter and decided to collaborate on the results of her questionnaire. But how? I’d only recently discovered BoardThing — an online collaborative tool based on a virtual whiteboard and sticky notes — and found it perfect for our purposes. While there is a chat function on the app, we used Skype simultaneously for even better results.

The first thing we did was co-create a concept map of the way data changes from raw data to appearing in journal, blogs and books.

Then we went back and forth discussing, creating and amending the visuals. 

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
How teachers find out what how students learn integrates theoretical and practical components. It is important to understand curriculum and teaching as complicated conversations that integrate the two.
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 8, 2016 10:17 AM
How teachers find out what how students learn integrates theoretical and practical components. It is important to understand curriculum and teaching as complicated conversations that integrate the two.
Carlos Vázquez's curator insight, March 8, 2016 10:44 PM
Share your insight
Virginia Katsimpiri's curator insight, March 9, 2016 6:08 AM
How teachers find out what how students learn integrates theoretical and practical components. It is important to understand curriculum and teaching as complicated conversations that integrate the two.
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Using systems for creativity diminishes your ability to experience it

Using systems for creativity diminishes your ability to experience it | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Using systems for creativity diminishes your ability to experience it...


Via craig daniels
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
When we speak about systems as if humans do not exist, we create ideologies and creativity, which is a human act, is diminished.
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Education : Reform or Transform? Sir Ted.

Education : Reform or Transform?    Sir Ted. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Greetings from Treehorn, the little fella.... Not in Australia, Sir Ken.  We STANDARDISE. We NAPLAN children. We aim for wholesale mediocrity according to Murdoch. ______________________________________________________________ Phil Cullen  41 Cominan Avenue  Banora Point  Australia 2486  07 5524 6443   cphilcullen@bigpond.com             http://primaryschooling.net/                     http://qldprimaryprincipals.wordpress.com/ 07 5524 6443          0407865999
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Transform means to go beyond where we are. It does not mean just doing what we are told. As teachers, we act and speak in ethical, practical, and situational contexts with children who have real names, faces, and stories. Our pedagogy is guided by the reality we experience in each moment.
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Teachers And Professional Collaboration: How Sweden Has Become The ABBA Of Educational Change

Teachers And Professional Collaboration: How Sweden Has Become The ABBA Of Educational Change | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Our guest author today is Andy Hargreaves, the Brennan Chair in Education at Boston College. He is the coauthor of Professional Capital: Transforming Teaching in Every School, which won the 2015 Grawemeyer Award for the idea in education most likely to have the most effect on practice worldwide. He is also the 2016 recipient of the Horace Mann League’s Outstanding Friend of Public Education Award. An extended version of this column originally appeared in Pedagogiska Magasinet, the Swedish teachers’ magazine in February 2016. In the 1960s and 70s, Sweden’s economic productivity and social engineering were the envy of democrats all over the world. The nation’s comprehensive schools were an inspiration for public education reformers in the United Kingdom and many other nations too. In Sweden, market prosperity and the collective good went side by side. It was a country where, like the nations’ classic pop group, Abba, people banded and bonded together really well. In the 90s, however, Sweden entered an age of what political scientists call free-market neo-liberalism, and educational reform was at the leading edge of it. In some ways moving ahead of the US trend, Sweden introduced large numbers of competitive “free schools”, funded with public money but no longer regulated by their school districts. Hedge fund companies were the largest single group of owners of these schools. Sweden’s society and its schools were, in the titles of two of Abba’s songs, now driven by a “Winner Takes it All” culture of “Money, Money, Money!” Between 2003 and 2012, Sweden experienced the greatest deterioration in PISA scores out of all OECD countries who were performing above average in 2003. Despite the country's proud and internationally admired egalitarian tradition, its achievement gaps have been widening faster than in any other country.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Good teaching is important to student learning. It cannot be completely measured by OECD outcomes, because of the relational nature of someone teaching someone something.
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How the power of gratitude can improve personal wellbeing

How the power of gratitude can improve personal wellbeing | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The evidence for practising gratitude techniques is now truly compellingWhen you hold feelings of thankfulness for at least 15 to 20 seconds, beneficial physiological changes take place in your body. Levels of the stress hormones cortisol and norepinephrine decrease, producing a cascade of beneficial metabolic changes. Coronary arteries relax and increase the blood supply to your heart. Your breathing becomes deeper, raising the oxygen level of your tissues.

Gratitude has been the “forgotten factor” in happiness research and scientists are latecomers to the concept of gratitude. 


Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The evidence for employing gratitude techniques to improve individual and collective well being is now truly compelling! Simply saying thank you and meaning it is makes a difference for students. A teacher who is genuinely grateful may be the only person who shows that to their students.

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Stewart-Marshall's curator insight, March 9, 2016 3:13 AM

The evidence for employing gratitude techniques to improve individual and collective well being is now truly compelling!

nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 9, 2016 7:09 AM

The evidence for employing gratitude techniques to improve individual and collective well being is now truly compelling!

Ian Berry's curator insight, March 10, 2016 5:18 PM

The evidence for employing gratitude techniques to improve individual and collective well being is now truly compelling! I like the poem and a key line "Thank you for the good times and thank you for the bad." Key to be grateful is being grateful for everything the remarkable, the great, the good, and the bad and the ugly.

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A Community Organizer's Definition Of Leadership - How Can It Be Applied To Education? (Part One)

A Community Organizer's Definition Of Leadership - How Can It Be Applied To Education? (Part One) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
See Part Two here. I've written, spoke, and shared a lot about teacher leadership (see The Best Posts, Articles & Videos On “Teacher Leadership”). Over the years, in my discussion of that topic...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There is a second part to this. What can we learn from other areas about leadership?
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Education Readings March 4th

Education Readings March 4th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Does Algebra Get in the Way of Student Success?/ Down With Algebra II! Here are a couple of links that discuss Andrew Hacker’s book ‘The Math Myth: And Other STEM Delusions.’ “Hacker’s central argument is…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The article questioning the usefulness of interactive whiteboards is interesting. Do we just accept new tools because we are expected to or do we have choice?
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TAA_07_02.pdf

Barbara K. Townsend is professor of higher education in the College of Education at the University of Missouri-Columbia and director of the Center for Community College Research. Her current research interests include access to and attainment of the baccalaureate, including through transfer and the community college baccalaureate.

Vicki J. Rosser is associate professor of higher education in the College of Education at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas and co-director of the University Council for Educational Administration Center for Academic Leadership. Her research interests include faculty members and midlevel administrative worklife issues, and leadership and academic governance.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
How do we measure this productivity? Measuring only against outcomes (although perhaps necessary) as an instrumental means misses the point of a relational profession, teaching.
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 3, 2016 10:49 AM
How do we measure this productivity? Measuring only against outcomes (although perhaps necessary) as an instrumental means misses the point of a relational profession, teaching.
Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, March 8, 2016 5:05 PM
How do we measure this productivity? Measuring only against outcomes (although perhaps necessary) as an instrumental means misses the point of a relational profession, teaching.
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Psychopathic schools

Psychopathic schools | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Some of my boarding school colleagues have a frenzied start to the day. Overseeing morning roll call in a fog of morning breath, checking that all the boys are present and correct, making sure they are dressed correctly, clean shaven, hair suitably brushed and off to breakfast. These days it also involves dispensing large quantities…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
David Jardine writes about teaching and learning as being focused on what is worthwhile. It is a play on words where we while over topics of worth and have meaningful conversations with others. William Pinar suggests something similar in his writing about curriculum. When we take time and go deep into our teaching and learning, it has more value and remains with us longer.
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Failure to Lunch

Failure to Lunch | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Where do you eat your lunch, bossFor 11 years, June Jo Lee, an ethnographer, has been traveling the country, talking to Americans about how they eat. She has often been in offices, observing white-collar workers. In one interview, a 20-something administrative assistant at an architecture firm in Seattle told her, ‘‘I don’t think I ate at a table at all this week if you don’t include my desk at work.’’ In Chicago, Lee talked to an I.T. specialist who lunched in front of his computer and assiduously avoided the break room; anyone who ate in there was odd. Another guy said that each week he would bring in a crudité party platter from Costco and graze from it when he got hungry.

Schooled in anthropology, Lee works for the Hartman Group, a consulting firm. She helps clients like Kraft Foods, PepsiCo, Nestlé, Whole Foods Market and Google better understand how people think about and consume food so they can repackage products and design new ones, find novel distribution methods or keep their own employees productive and well fed. After all her conversations, note taking and analysis, Lee summarizes her findings like this: ‘‘The way people eat at work is pretty sad.’’


Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Where do you eat your lunch, boss? And have you though about the impact of that on workplace relations? It may be important to create different norms around where and when we eat lunch. Look at education and how infrequently teachers do not eat lunch away from their classrooms.

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David Hain's curator insight, March 2, 2016 11:26 AM

Where do you eat your lunch, boss? And have you though about the impact of that on workplace relations?

Ricard Lloria's curator insight, March 3, 2016 1:38 AM

Where do you eat your lunch, boss? And have you though about the impact of that on workplace relations?