Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges

When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By identifying thinking routines for students, teachers can help deepen metacognitive skills that are applicable to all areas of life.

Via Maree Whiteley
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Another very useful reminder from the Project Zero team about the importance of 'learning how to learn' and building a 'culture of thinking' within every school community. Teaching and structure are important. Learning is not a free-for-all. It can be chaotic, but teachers actions and words help  bring structure to that chaos.
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Maree Whiteley's curator insight, March 31, 2016 9:32 AM
Another very useful reminder from the Project Zero team about the importance of 'learning how to learn' and building a 'culture of thinking' within every school community.
Pilar Moral's curator insight, April 1, 2016 4:46 AM
Another very useful reminder from the Project Zero team about the importance of 'learning how to learn' and building a 'culture of thinking' within every school community. Teaching and structure are important. Learning is not a free-for-all. It can be chaotic, but teachers actions and words help  bring structure to that chaos.
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How to Move from First Person to Learner Centered Teaching (EdSurge News)

How to Move from First Person to Learner Centered Teaching (EdSurge News) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In a famous essay about characters in fiction, the novelist Mary McCarthy wrote, “We are the hero of our own story.” I’m often reminded of this in my work, helping faculty to improve their teaching. After classroom observations, when I ask instructors how they thought it went, they naturally thin

Via Ramiro Aduviri Velasco, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am finding that teachers do focus on students and it could be they need to see teaching as something they do more. It is a challenging paradox with no easy answers.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 30, 2016 8:07 PM
I am finding that teachers do focus on students and it could be they need to see teaching as something they do more. It is a challenging paradox with no easy answers.
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How Meaningful Feedback for Teachers and Students Improves Relationships

How Meaningful Feedback for Teachers and Students Improves Relationships | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A National Teacher of the Year demonstrates how he regularly tries to improve his teaching practice, this time by giving and getting more authentic feedback.
Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Acknowledging we do not know everything and we are learners,is important in teaching. What do students bring to the conversation? That is an important question.

School managers and executives can take that as a message in providing feedback for teachers. As well, I am finding that teachers do not always have time to reflect and have peer level conversations.
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Sharrock's curator insight, March 30, 2016 1:17 PM
Acknowledging we do not know everything and we are learners,is important in teaching. What do students bring to the conversation? That is an important question.

School managers and executives can take that as a message in providing feedback for teachers. As well, I am finding that teachers do not always have time to reflect and have peer level conversations.
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What Do We Lose By Measuring ‘Average’ In Education?

What Do We Lose By Measuring ‘Average’ In Education? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By designing systems for the average person, individuals lose out on potential opportunities to excel.

Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Miloš Bajčetić
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I asked a group of Grade 9 students about averages and average students. They knew there was no such thing, but we persist. Good teachers understand they teach children with real names, real faces, and real stories.
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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, March 29, 2016 1:09 AM

I know very few people that like to be considered average.  But this concept is great for people to use to hide their weaknesses. -Lon

Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, March 29, 2016 8:30 PM
I asked a group of Grade 9 students about averages and average students. They knew there was no such thing, but we persist. Good teachers understand they teach children with real names, real faces, and real stories.
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Changing Grade Scales: Much Ado about Nothing (It Just Doesn’t Matter)

South Carolina's new superintendent of education has proposed that the state change (again, as last time it was about state-wide uniformity) to a 10-point grade scale to put our students in line with neighboring states. This plan has mostly been met with a sky-is-falling response, for example: "The last thing South Carolina schools need to…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Yesterday, I read a quote suggesting the only place for innovation is inside the box. That is the problem with school reform. We shuffle the deck we have and nothing changes. We can't throw everything out at once, so we need to conserve what works and replace what is outdated and not current.
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60-hour weeks and unrealistic targets: teachers' working lives uncovered

60-hour weeks and unrealistic targets: teachers' working lives uncovered | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
theguardian.com - Of the 4,450 respondents to the Guardian teacher network and Guardian jobs survey about teachers’ lives, 82% stated that their workload was unmanageable, with two-thirds saying that expectations ha...
Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
60 hour work weeks are low for many teachers. How do they experience that? How have they become socialized into accepting this?
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Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, March 28, 2016 7:51 PM
60 hour work weeks are low for many teachers. How do they experience that? How have they become socialized into accepting this?
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Hard thinking on soft skills :: Brookings Institution

Hard thinking on soft skills :: Brookings Institution | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The nation’s PK-12 education ecosystem is poised to embrace programs intended to enhance soft skills. Soft skills are generally defined by exclusion as personal qualities other than the formal knowledge transmitted by schools that affect student adjustment, i.e., the effort that students put into their work and their social skills. Such soft skills are far too important for the education reform effort associated with them to suffer the fad-like fate of far too many education reforms of the past. There are danger signs in that regard.

One problem is that advocates of soft skills reform have approached the conceptualization and measurement of soft skills in ways akin to how psychologists approach human personality, i.e., as relatively enduring, trait-like individual differences in broad patterns of behavior. Such patterns of behavior are highly heritable, meaning that schools will have difficulty influencing differences among students. They are also abstract and general, meaning that they provide little of the specificity that is needed for the design of curriculum for students in different grades or for the provision of useful feedback to teachers or students. Further, the theory and measurement of soft skills in schools is in its infancy, with many critically important questions unanswered.

Also troubling are recent research findings that charter schools that are both effective in raising student achievement and focused on character development either have no impact or a negative impact on students’ self-reported soft skills. Such findings conflict with the implicit theoretical model of soft skills reform in which the causal path to better academic achievement and life outcomes flows through students’ soft skills as enhanced by schools.  

A prudent way forward for educators given the many acknowledged unknowns in soft skills reform is to substantially enhance efforts that fall within traditional school practices and responsibilities rather than to boldly make risky bets on unproven programs and measures. Practical steps for school and district administrators include: 1) focusing on improving student behavior, not personality traits; 2) implementing schoolwide rule systems focused on respectful social interactions; 3) using measures of soft skills that are naturally occurring and useful as feedback at the classroom and individual level; 4) establishing priorities around students who are significantly off-track in their social-emotional behavior or self-management skills; 5) establishing priorities around remediation or removal of teachers whose interpersonal behavior toward students is likely to be doing harm; and 6) putting in place systematic ways to learn from and improve the reform efforts.

Via Jim Lerman, Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Talk to teachers. The soft skills are important to them and what they teach students.
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Jim Lerman's curator insight, March 28, 2016 1:54 AM

Is Whitehurst's approach too cautious? Does he accurately describe the lack of concensus on definition of soft skills? Does choosing the term "soft skills" further confuse the issue? Are efforts to standardize measurement/assessment of soft skills outcomes well-advised? Does not the failure of the NCLB regimen of standardized curriculum and assessment provide sufficient caution about trying to standardize an even harder-to-define collection of soft-skills outcomes?

Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 28, 2016 2:12 AM

Is Whitehurst's approach too cautious? Does he accurately describe the lack of concensus on definition of soft skills? Does choosing the term "soft skills" further confuse the issue? Are efforts to standardize measurement/assessment of soft skills outcomes well-advised? Does not the failure of the NCLB regimen of standardized curriculum and assessment provide sufficient caution about trying to standardize an even harder-to-define collection of soft-skills outcomes?

Suvi Salo's curator insight, March 28, 2016 2:15 AM
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Fair Grades, Dropping Grades, Grading Versus Knowledge via @coolcatteacher

Fair Grades, Dropping Grades, Grading Versus Knowledge via @coolcatteacher | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
With almost 9,000 downloads and counting, this show is the most popular episode on Every Classroom Matters in 2016 so far. Dr. Thomas Guskey shares the current research on “fair” grading and what teachers should be doing instead. This show came from the “averaging grades” graphic (shown at the bottom) that he posted on Twitter […]

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I attended several of Thomas Guskey's presentations when I still taught. He makes one think about how we understand learning, teaching, and grading. As well, I began to wonder about educational reform as a dead end. We want to transform (or in Dewey's language reconstruct) school. Conserve what is of value and replace what is not. It is both conservative and progressive, but we need to have a sense of what we value in our schools. Do we?
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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, March 27, 2016 8:20 PM
I attended several of Thomas Guskey's presentations when I still taught. He makes one think about how we understand learning, teaching, and grading. As well, I began to wonder about educational reform as a dead end. We want to transform (or in Dewey's language reconstruct) school. Conserve what is of value and replace what is not. It is both conservative and progressive, but we need to have a sense of what we value in our schools. Do we?
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How to Develop the Growth Mindset

How to Develop the Growth Mindset | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“My current skills are mostly irrelevant. I will improve over time if I put in the time to learn the appropriate skills, strategies, and frameworks. This growth mindset propels me towards greater success.”
Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Worth reflecting on! I used to tell administrators, who insisted on a particular way and content in teaching, that the skills and content we learn in school today are obsolete so quickly. Taubman suggested students ability to study and be critical learners is important.
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David Hain's curator insight, March 26, 2016 5:04 AM
Worth reflecting on!
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A Poem about Teaching and A Critique (Taylor Mali and Joe Bower)

A Poem about Teaching and A Critique (Taylor Mali and Joe Bower) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Like doctors, lawyers, architects, and therapists, teachers disagree about the nature of teaching and the ends that teaching and learning should attain. Such disagreements go back millennia and it is worthwhile to remind ourselves of these honest and deep disagreements that exist among teachers. Consider the following poem (“What Teachers Make”) by Taylor Mali and…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
William Pinar and Gert Biesta suggest the current neo-liberal model of education makes student learning a teacher responsibility. It is not. Teachers are responsible to invite students to take responsibility for their learning. This is not a one-time event, but an ongoing event. Event here is not one moment in time. Biesta uses Levinas to argue this concept

The key is good teachers (Mali and Bower) are able to have a conversation about what teaching can be.
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Personalize Learning: Continuum of Motivation: Moving from Extrinsic to Intrinsic

Personalize Learning: Continuum of Motivation: Moving from Extrinsic to Intrinsic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Motivation affects how we learn. The Continuum of Motivation walks you up the mountain from Instrumental to Self-Actualization where learners are intrinsically motivated to learn.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Where do we want teachers to be on the continuum? I experienced more of the instrumental end of the spectrum where administrators ordered us, in multiple ways.
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 26, 2016 12:09 PM
Useful motivation knowledge.
nathalie chiasson's curator insight, March 30, 2016 6:58 AM
Useful motivation knowledge.
ismokuhanen's curator insight, April 3, 2016 5:26 AM
Useful motivation knowledge.
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Education Readings March 25th

Education Readings March 25th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz The forcible conversion of England’s schools to Academies (Charter Schools) This announcement by the British government has sent shock waves around the country and mass rebellion is developing. New Zealand teacher John Palethorpe, a relatively…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The last article looks good. What do we need to do as teachers to help students have a passion and be responsible for their learning?
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100+ Motivational Quotes On Dream, Goal And Future

100+ Motivational Quotes On Dream, Goal And Future | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Check this out if you need some motivation on the journey of chasing your dream!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Useful reminders of what humans and living can be about.
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What Is Cognitive Rigor?

What Is Cognitive Rigor? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Rigor has become the educational "buzzword" of the 21st Century.  Cognitive rigor is marked and measured by the depth and extent students are challenged and engaged to demonstrate and communicate

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Alfie Kohn suggested the word rigor/rigour has to do with rigidity. What about the word vigor/vigour which has to do with life and being life-giving, suggesting flexiblity? Or. would that be too much for those who want to control and manage?
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Cindy Riley Klages's curator insight, March 31, 2016 1:55 PM
Alfie Kohn suggested the word rigor/rigour has to do with rigidity. What about the word vigor/vigour which has to do with life and being life-giving, suggesting flexiblity? Or. would that be too much for those who want to control and manage?
Vivián Castellanos.'s curator insight, April 1, 2016 4:28 PM

This article show us that many people have different skills, some of them have "thinking" but they don't have "knowledge" or vice versa. This is something that we must correct. 

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Group learning makes children better decision-makers – UKEdChat.com

Group learning makes children better decision-makers – UKEdChat.com | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Children who participate in collaborative group work to learn about significant social issues become better [...]


Via Case Swarm, Tania Sims
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We used tables and it led to great conversations. The key was to take time and include everyone, however recognizing some students prefer to sit back and listen.
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Tania Sims's curator insight, March 29, 2016 1:29 PM
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 30, 2016 8:08 PM
We used tables and it led to great conversations. The key was to take time and include everyone, however recognizing some students prefer to sit back and listen.
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What Compels People to Pursue Radical Innovations in Education

What Compels People to Pursue Radical Innovations in Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

What compels people to pursue more radical innovations in education? It has now been almost two decades since I started to more seriously and systematically study innovations in education and innovative learning organizations. Many of the musings about that show up in the chapters of my book on Missional Moonshots (not to mention the many articles on this blog), but since my exploration started, I can’t think of a single day that has passed without some thought experiment or reflection about educational innovation. In that sense, it has become a consuming passion for me because I see educational innovation as an important social good, and I have immense respect for those who tap into the courage, creativity and hard work necessary to pursue revolutionary or radical innovations in education.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/the-new-possibilities-to-learn-and-teach-with-ict/

 


Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

What compels people to pursue more radical innovations in education? It has now been almost two decades since I started to more seriously and systematically study innovations in education and innovative learning organizations. Many of the musings about that show up in the chapters of my book on Missional Moonshots (not to mention the many articles on this blog), but since my exploration started, I can’t think of a single day that has passed without some thought experiment or reflection about educational innovation. In that sense, it has become a consuming passion for me because I see educational innovation as an important social good, and I have immense respect for those who tap into the courage, creativity and hard work necessary to pursue revolutionary or radical innovations in education.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/the-new-possibilities-to-learn-and-teach-with-ict/

 

 

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Juan Quiñones's curator insight, March 31, 2016 9:38 AM

What compels people to pursue more radical innovations in education? It has now been almost two decades since I started to more seriously and systematically study innovations in education and innovative learning organizations. Many of the musings about that show up in the chapters of my book on Missional Moonshots (not to mention the many articles on this blog), but since my exploration started, I can’t think of a single day that has passed without some thought experiment or reflection about educational innovation. In that sense, it has become a consuming passion for me because I see educational innovation as an important social good, and I have immense respect for those who tap into the courage, creativity and hard work necessary to pursue revolutionary or radical innovations in education.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/the-new-possibilities-to-learn-and-teach-with-ict/

 

 

Skip Gole's curator insight, March 31, 2016 11:51 AM

What compels people to pursue more radical innovations in education? It has now been almost two decades since I started to more seriously and systematically study innovations in education and innovative learning organizations. Many of the musings about that show up in the chapters of my book on Missional Moonshots (not to mention the many articles on this blog), but since my exploration started, I can’t think of a single day that has passed without some thought experiment or reflection about educational innovation. In that sense, it has become a consuming passion for me because I see educational innovation as an important social good, and I have immense respect for those who tap into the courage, creativity and hard work necessary to pursue revolutionary or radical innovations in education.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/the-new-possibilities-to-learn-and-teach-with-ict/

 

 

Fernando de la Cruz Naranjo Grisales's curator insight, April 2, 2016 7:06 AM

What compels people to pursue more radical innovations in education? It has now been almost two decades since I started to more seriously and systematically study innovations in education and innovative learning organizations. Many of the musings about that show up in the chapters of my book on Missional Moonshots (not to mention the many articles on this blog), but since my exploration started, I can’t think of a single day that has passed without some thought experiment or reflection about educational innovation. In that sense, it has become a consuming passion for me because I see educational innovation as an important social good, and I have immense respect for those who tap into the courage, creativity and hard work necessary to pursue revolutionary or radical innovations in education.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2016/02/18/the-new-possibilities-to-learn-and-teach-with-ict/

 

 

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52 Of Our Favorite Inspirational Quotes For Teachers - TeachThought

52 Of Our Favorite Inspirational Quotes For Teachers - TeachThought | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We’ve dug through dozens of books, teacher magazines, pinterest boards, and other blogs to find 52 of our favorite inspirational quotes for teachers. We’ve tried to come up with a range of ways of thinking about teaching and learning without resorting to the most cliche lines you’ve heard again and again.

Some of these you’ve likely heard before, but hopefully the bulk of them are both new, and capable of that extra push when you need it.

Via John Evans, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
These are quotes that do not go out of style.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 29, 2016 9:28 PM
These are quotes that do not go out of style.
Ron Wolford's curator insight, July 18, 2016 11:19 AM
Teach Thought
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Emotions Matter: emotional intelligence is key to better health, learning and relationships

Emotions Matter: emotional intelligence is key to better health, learning and relationships | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It’s not always easy for adults to remember exactly what high school was like. Time tends to soften the harsher side of history, leaving our memories colored by what we want to remember rather than what we actually experienced.

Via Pavel Barta
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Part of teaching is an autobiographical component. Teachers often say that we teach the way they wanted to be taught.
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Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, March 28, 2016 4:11 PM
Part of teaching is an autobiographical component. Teachers often say that we teach the way they wanted to be taught.
Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, March 28, 2016 7:50 PM
Part of teaching is an autobiographical component. Teachers often say that we teach the way they wanted to be taught.
Geoffrey Grant's curator insight, March 29, 2016 1:26 AM
Part of teaching is an autobiographical component. Teachers often say that we teach the way they wanted to be taught.
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Intellectually Gifted Kids And Learning Disabilities Often Go Hand In Hand

Intellectually Gifted Kids And Learning Disabilities Often Go Hand In Hand | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
We need to think about giftedness and special education as an "and" proposition. Most of teaching is not either/or, but exists on a continuum that stretches into infinity.
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, March 29, 2016 6:20 AM
We need to think about giftedness and special education as an "and" proposition. Most of teaching is not either/or, but exists on a continuum that stretches into infinity.
Tania Sims's curator insight, March 29, 2016 1:22 PM
We need to think about giftedness and special education as an "and" proposition. Most of teaching is not either/or, but exists on a continuum that stretches into infinity.
Pilar Moral's curator insight, April 1, 2016 4:49 AM
We need to think about giftedness and special education as an "and" proposition. Most of teaching is not either/or, but exists on a continuum that stretches into infinity.
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Recess for High School Students

Recess for High School Students | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Last year, Montpelier High shifted its schedule to free up 15 minutes -- for recess. Teachers and students find they are more calm and focused, with a camaraderie that continues into the classroom.
Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Junior high students enjoyed the breaks. It gave them a chance to go outside, chat, and catch up with others.
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Creating Core Memories in the Classroom

In her second post about the film "Inside Out," Lori Desautels suggests creating positive academic core memories by respecting your classroom's emotional climate and engaging students' curiosity and anticipation.
Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A teacher I interviewed told me the purpose of teaching is to create memories.
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Suvi Salo's curator insight, March 26, 2016 12:47 PM
A teacher I interviewed told me the purpose of teaching is to create memories.
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How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty

How to Spark Curiosity in Children Through Embracing Uncertainty | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to confront what we don't know can trigger curiosity and lead to new discoveries, according to author Jamie Holmes.

Via Grant Montgomery, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When I talk to teachers, I am struck by the paradox of teaching. They tell me how much they want certainty, knowing full well that is not able. They remain open and curious under those conditions. That is a role model for students.
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Mark E. Deschaine, PhD's curator insight, March 26, 2016 12:00 PM
When I talk to teachers, I am struck by the paradox of teaching. They tell me how much they want certainty, knowing full well that is not able. They remain open and curious under those conditions. That is a role model for students.
Dion Acha's curator insight, March 26, 2016 10:14 PM
The title itself caught my attention and was very interested in the content of the article. As a student, I can relate when a teacher lectures about an event and us students believe we know every fact of it and never question the mysterious side. The article gave a few steps into raising curiosity and what stood out instantly was when the author mentioned "provide assignments that students will fail." I found it very ironic how educators would give assignments that students would fail when they should help them succeed. This article provided a whole new perspective of educating students; helping them find the answers to their questions rather than handing it out easily. If educators adapted this style, i strongly believe it would challenge students' brains into figuring out different solutions.
Educational Peaks's curator insight, March 29, 2016 12:27 PM
When I talk to teachers, I am struck by the paradox of teaching. They tell me how much they want certainty, knowing full well that is not able. They remain open and curious under those conditions. That is a role model for students.
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leading and learning: Education Readings for creative teachers - UK Academies and Charter Schools; Standardized testing and targets.

leading and learning: Education Readings for creative teachers - UK Academies and Charter Schools; Standardized testing and targets. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Here is some good reading.
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Lynnette Van Dyke's curator insight, March 26, 2016 7:04 AM
Here is some good reading.
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How Your Leadership Skills Will Determine Your Company Culture

How Your Leadership Skills Will Determine Your Company Culture | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about the culture you want to build, then master these leadership skills. The rest will fall into place.
Via Alexis Assimacopoulos, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Leadership is about listening, observing, stepping back, etc. Schools lack leadership. We settle for managers who check off lists.
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School conditions matter for student achievement, new research confirms

School conditions matter for student achievement, new research confirms | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Move over, teacher quality. A new study on New York City schools could make school climate the next frontier in […]
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Actually, this is not new research findings. Bryk and others came to similar conclusions in the 1990's. James Comer and Deborah Meier argued that teachers were vital to schools and creating healthy environments.

For me, the question is "When do we begin transforming schools in real ways?"
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Dean J. Fusto's curator insight, March 24, 2016 6:53 PM
Actually, this is not new research findings. Bryk and others came to similar conclusions in the 1990's. James Comer and Deborah Meier argued that teachers were vital to schools and creating healthy environments.

For me, the question is "When do we begin transforming schools in real ways?"