Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback

5 Research-Based Tips for Providing Students with Meaningful Feedback | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Teacher feedback must be informative and encouraging for students to fully understand whether they're learning and what they can do to improve the learning process.


Via Dan Kirsch, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Teachers who listen closely and provide specific feedback help their students with their learning. A second aspect is that students begin to take control of their learning and know when to ask and receive help. @ivon_ehd1
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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 2014 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine, PhD I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
Alan Jordan's curator insight, April 3, 2016 4:13 PM

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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15 Leadership Books Every Future Leader Should Read (or anyone actually)

15 Leadership Books Every Future Leader Should Read (or anyone actually) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many times I've had people ask me, "In addition to coaching and training, what else can I do to learn more about how to improve myself? How can I learn to be a great leader that propels myself and others towards greater growth and greater opportunities?"

 My answer is simple, read. Read everything you can about successful leaders and the steps that they have taken to achieve peak performance for themselves and their organisations.

 The following is a list, and brief overview, of some of the best books that I have read about leadership.

Via David Hain, Create Wise Leader
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A list that includes Viktor Frankl and Man's Search for Meaning is good.
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David Hain's curator insight, June 22, 6:21 AM

If you only have a small bookshelf and a thirst for leadership wisdom, here's a good way to fill it!

Jerry Busone's curator insight, June 23, 7:46 AM

being honest not all these are what I'd call 21st century reads... lesson is simple read something about our craft and make yourself better . Read my book #offthebenchleadership or another ... but read 

Ian Berry's curator insight, June 24, 7:37 PM
What I do is compare recommended reading lists When the same books appear I get them As is this case with this list a few make my lists too http://www.ianberry.biz/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/IanBerrysrecommendedreadinglist.pdf
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Five ways mindfulness can help you to be more creative

Five ways mindfulness can help you to be more creative | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Focusing on the present moment through the practice of mindfulness can help you and your team be more innovative. Here are some practical ways you can use mindfulness to develop creativity.


Via Roger Francis, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When I meditate, I get up and see the world differently than when I began. Being mindful is being present in new ways. I listened to students and parents differently.
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We need to give our brains difficult tasks to understand 'real thinking'

We need to give our brains difficult tasks to understand 'real thinking' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Neuroscientists say a full understanding of the complexity of the human brain will require new research strategies that better simulate real-world conditions.

Via THE *OFFICIAL ANDREASCY*, Stephania Savva, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
People need to be stretched in their learning. That does not mean what they are learning is something that lacks familiarity. Instead, it is something that is familiar and moves learning forward as it challenges us to think differently and in new ways.

People enjoy solving problems. A problem piques their curiousity. They want to learn more and things they do not already know about that learning. When students completed their Science Fair for class, they were asked to describe what they learned and, if their experiment did not yield their anticipated results, why.
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Are you a boss who plays favorites? Break those bad habits

We all have some working relationships that just work better than others. It can be tempting to latch on to what has been successful for us in the past, whether that’s a certain style, a certain personality type or even a specific person or group. While it’s good to play to your strengths, there’s a difference between sticking with what works and being stuck in a rut.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
These are six leadership habits, which can both hurt and harm organizations. Being aware of them and how they can hurt an organization is essential. Trust is an important quality.
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Adaptive or Transactional Leadership in Current Higher Education: A Brief Comparison | Khan | The International Review of Research in Open and Distributed Learning

Adaptive or Transactional Leadership in Current Higher Education: A Brief Comparison

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Soizic Merdrignac aka @SoizicAbidjan, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The conclusion makes sense. No organization, including schools, can use one form of leadership to move forward. The complexity is such that leading well is adapting and moving between styles depending on context. It is like good teaching.
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Anne Lamott: A Cure for Perfectionism – Better Humans

Anne Lamott: A Cure for Perfectionism – Better Humans | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Lamott’s Bird by Bird: Some Instructions in Writing and Life is often thrown at new writers (for good reason), and it was of great help to me when I was first learning to write. The perfectionist…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Change the word writer to teacher and the same things apply: wanting to be perfect, having fantasies over ideal teaching scenarios which do not happen, you will come up short, etc.

Anne Lamott has a way of writing to remind us life is complicated and can be fun if you let it be. Teaching is as much about learning as it is about teaching.
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10 Key Differences Between a Boss and a Leader: Which Are You? | AllBusiness.com

10 Key Differences Between a Boss and a Leader: Which Are You? | AllBusiness.com | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Post sponsored by Alvernia University. How can managers today better engage and motivate their employees? The answer is by striving to be more than just a boss and instead becoming a true leader.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Roy Sheneman, PhD, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
If I change the word leader to teacher, similar traits remain in place.
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Reimagining 21st Century Learning - DML Central 

Reimagining 21st Century Learning - DML Central  | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Reimagining Leonardo da Vinci for the 21st century is how people will be able to cultivate “a new way of knowing” and learning in the next 80 years of rapid and constant technological advances, according to John Seely Brown, former director of the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center and the author of “A New Culture of Learning” and “The Social Life of Information.”

Via Elizabeth E Charles, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The essential skill is imagining how we teach and live in a hyper-connected world.
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Your Story Is The Most Marketable Trait You Have as a Writer

Your Story Is The Most Marketable Trait You Have as a Writer | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As Seth Godin mentions in his book All Marketers are Liars, everybody is a marketer these days. If you’ve got something to sell — a product, service, or even an idea — you need to tell people a story…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I don't agree with the premise we are all marketers. That is not what living is about.

I do agree with the idea we are all storytellers and who we are is essential to narrating our story. From a teaching perspecpectve, this takes us to the currere method. We filter the official curricula we teach through our story. From an ethical standpoint, this makes who we and our character essential to teaching. When  I read Ricoeur, Levinas, Gadamer, etc. there is an ethical essence to how we narrate our personal story.
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“Why is your research important?” – Society

“Why is your research important?” – Society | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One of the strongest arguments for the importance of basic research is that without it, the scientific discoveries and technological innovations of the last century with the greatest societal impact would have been impossible. Without basic research, it is unlikely that we would have cell phones, computers, or the internet. We wouldn’t have advances in green energy, or even an understanding of why developing green energy sources might be important for our future. And we wouldn’t have new cancer treatments, HIV drug development, or the emerging promise of personalized medicine and genome editing. For all of these incredible advances, tracing back to the scientific discoveries making them possible inevitably reveals important but obscure research done by scientists not interested in creating the next Earth-shattering technological innovation, but instead just trying to use science to understand why and how things work the way they do.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Good research is essential to improve teaching and learning. The key here is we stand on the shoulders of those who come before. We question what is taken-for-granted. It is not just quantitative research, but mixed methods and qualitative that add to the science. John Dewey used the etymology of empiricism, which means "a rule fo thumb." That is where we begin. Classroom teachers can add to the research if given opportunities and time.
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Sharrock's curator insight, June 15, 9:32 AM
Science teachers and social studies teachers alike need to be able to answer questions similar to this question. By using history to support scientific discoveries as accidents is not enough to drive home the idea that exploring to understand how and why things work out of curiosity can lead to future benefits that may save mankind. This is a powerful statement: "Basic research is generally done to further scientific knowledge without obvious or immediate societal benefits. If, like me, you do basic research, the question about why your research is important for society is difficult to answer." It can begin with this article.

The mindset against basic science is similar to the argument for turning education into a commodity, something to make a profit or to "get rich" with. Learning more about something serves humanity regardless of whether the understanding leads to immediate profit, immediate benefits, or leads to the solution to some future, unexpected problem. 
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Leaders who listen create space for great ideas to emerge

For many years, I worked with a highly effective (and very respected) leader named Jack, who at the time was a senior executive at a large insurance company. After working together on a few corporate projects, Jack asked me to lead a three-day strategic planning session for his team. About two hours into the first day of our meeting, I noticed something unusual: Jack had contributed very little to the discussion. Aside from opening remarks and the occasional clarifying statement, Jack sat leaning back in his chair, quietly observing.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
School staff meetings are a performance for administrators. They do little to add to open dialogue.
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Physically abused kids learn to fail at social rules for success

Physically abused kids learn to fail at social rules for success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“Physically abused kids fail to adjust flexibly to new behavioral rules in contexts outside their families,” says coauthor Seth Pollak, a psychologist at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Youth who have endured hitting, choking and other bodily assaults by their parents view the world as a place where hugs and other gratifying responses to good behavior occur inconsistently, if at all. So these youngsters stick to what they learned early in life from volatile parents — rewards are rare and unpredictable, but punishment is always imminent. Kids armed with this expectation of futility end up fighting peers on the playground and antagonizing teachers, Pollak says.


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
How do we help students? One teacher told me she invites them to teach her about their trauma as they become comfortable in doing so.
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Let's Stop With The Worksheets And Create Engaged Readers -

Let's Stop With The Worksheets And Create Engaged Readers - | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Rarity of Engaged Reading by Angela Peery, TeachThought PD Facilitator Grow with >> TeachThought PD Literacy Workshops Picture a classroom full of youngsters. They could be darling, chubby-cheeked kindergartners or swaggering, confident high school seniors – or anything in between.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Two stories came to mind for me as I read the article. A student who struggled with reading had begun reading Underground to Canada. The following year I noticed he had started reading the book from the beginning. I asked "why?" He said he enjoyed the book so much, had not finished it the year before, and did not want to miss anything in it.

A student and I decided to read Night by Elie Wiesel as a novel study. I told her not to read ahead as I wanted to discuss chapters as she read them. The following week she came to school and told me she had read the whole book in one sitting. She asked, "are we supposed to cry when we read a book?" I said, "yes, depending on the book." We figured out another way to discuss the book.
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Project Based Learning is a Roller Coaster by Catlin Tucker

Project Based Learning is a Roller Coaster by Catlin Tucker | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
One of the most challenging aspects of this school year has been using project-based learning to integrate curriculum. Projects are a beast! It feels like I am boarding a roller coaster each time we begin a new project. In fact,

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Project-based learning was invigorating for students and me. It allowed me to teach in a cross-curricular manner, integrating subjects. For example, The Cay provided bridged Social Studies, Science and Language Arts.

I spent time with multiple curricula, the projects, and rubrics each year. At the heart of a project are problems waiting to be addressed
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Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, June 23, 12:55 PM
Less is more.
Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, June 23, 6:16 PM
Have you tried project based learning with your English language learners? If so, was it a roller coaster?  PBL is challenging, and one has to be ready for that challenge.  
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Try These 7 Writing Exercises to Boost Students' Creative Writing Skills

Try These 7 Writing Exercises to Boost Students' Creative Writing Skills | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
From some of the experts in our midst comes a host of powerful and effective writing exercises that will get students thinking critically and creatively.

Via Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D., Penelope
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I wish I had known about these when I taught. I used some of them i.e. visual prompts and describing something in a 100 words.

Morning writing would have been a great idea. Students could have walked in and written about was happening in their lives.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, March 8, 6:06 PM

There are some wonderful ideas here, most of which can be modified easily for different grade levels. They don't have to be limited to creative writing because the skills themselves can be applicable to a range of writing activities.

Penelope's curator insight, March 9, 9:35 PM
I love these suggestions for writing exercises! These are super for students, but will work equally well for writers of all ages.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
Charlie Dare's curator insight, March 28, 6:51 AM
Scripts have to be written~ There are some wonderful ideas here, most of which can be modified easily for your production project in mind. They don't have to be limited to creative writing because the skills themselves can be applicable to a range of writing activities.
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Have we been taught poetry all wrong?

Have we been taught poetry all wrong? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Poet Matthew Zapruder say that we are too often asked to find the "hidden meanings" in poems, as if a poem is a riddle.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I used to ask: "what does this poem mean to you?" I agree with the author, Matthew Zapruder, that we treat poems like riddles. Quite often, the meaning is right there, even if it is somewhat different for each person.
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Podcast - Michael Fullan part 1 – New Pedagogies for Deep Learning

Podcast - Michael Fullan part 1 – New Pedagogies for Deep Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
NPDLConnect Podcast series Michael Fullan is a worldwide authority on educational reform. Michael “walks the talk” by leading our NPDL Partnership – a global endeavor to shift pedagogy and deepen learning  in over 1000 schools in 7 countries. A former Dean of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) of the University of Toronto, Michael …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I agree with the point about overlooking teachers as a source of theoretical understanding about their own pedagogy. Fullan might feel he encourages policy makers and local school districts to use teachers as leaders. It isn't happening.

I am concerned about the use of catch phrases i.e. deep pedagogy and deep learning in this case. What do they mean in the day-to-day practice of teaching and learning?
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Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, June 22, 5:23 AM
Spits uw oren!
Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, June 23, 1:03 PM
Share your insight
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Modern Professional Learning: Guidelines & Resources

Modern Professional Learning: Guidelines & Resources | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Many of the points are being resonsible for one's own learning. This is a challenge in teaching. I discovered the more I did that the less school managers wanted me to. I persisted.
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Elaine J Roberts, Ph.D.'s curator insight, June 20, 9:31 AM

Learn something new every day. Manage your own self-development. Those two are powerful ways anyone can ensure they continue to learn, develop, and become the kind of person, employee or employer, and colleague they want to be.

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Why Supportive Relationships Matter More in the Digital Age

Why Supportive Relationships Matter More in the Digital Age | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Humor me for a minute and pause to think about a time in your past where you felt really engaged in your work; where time flew by and you looked forward to the day. If you don’t have such a memory…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This may be why good teachers and their teaching never go out of style.
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Ten Things Every Educator Should Say More Often

Ten Things Every Educator Should Say More Often | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In a previous post, I shared eight things a successful educator should never say . Admittedly, that is a negative way to think about th
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The two little words "thank you" are essential, as are good morning and a genuine asking of "how are you?"

Listening is essential as well. How do I listen? Do I lean in? Do I want to here the other's story?
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Umberto Eco: The Productivity Patterns of a Polymath

Umberto Eco: The Productivity Patterns of a Polymath | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“No, it doesn’t happen.” he replied. Pausing for a moment, he added, “Oh, well, yes, there was a period of two days when I had my surgery.” Umberto Eco was a modern polymath. He was fluent five…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The line that stood out for me was "our lives are full of interstices." We can go down many paths. I think we have become locked into being specialists in ways that do not serve us as individual people and a collective well.

Schools do not help the cuase. Dewey argued we put up boundaries between subjects rather than understanding they exist in totality. How do school subjects overlap and inform one another? For me, that is an essential and eloquent question>
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Cutting the Gordian Knot of Technological Unemployment with Unconditional Basic Income

Cutting the Gordian Knot of Technological Unemployment with Unconditional Basic Income | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The creation and use of ever more sophisticated tools that allow humankind to do increasingly more with increasingly less is extraordinary, but it has a catch. What is it, and how do we resolve it?

Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
With increasing automation in workplaces i.e. manufacturing and restaurants, basic income is part of a broader answer. Another part of the solution is to teach skills that prepare students for an uncertain future and are grounded in the present i.e. problem solving. This includes considering trans-disciplinary teaching.

One of the teachers I interviewed spoke about this at length. Teachers would teach side-by-side and that has its own benefits.
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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, June 4, 11:30 AM

We really do need the Unconditional Basic Income for a sustainable and progressive future.

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Groupthink

Groupthink | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The brainstorming myth.

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When we brainstorm, we often fall into the trap of ending up with everyone agreeing, even if they do not. It is a risk in Socratic circles. Do we end up, as teachers, bringing students back to what we want them to think with our questions? Groupthink can end up limiting creativity and learning.
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Are You Solving the Right Problems?

Are You Solving the Right Problems? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How good is your company at problem solving? Probably quite good, if your managers are like those at the companies I’ve studied. What they struggle with, it turns out, is not solving problems but figuring out what the problems are. In surveys of 106 C-suite executives who represented 91 private and public-sector companies in 17 countries, I found that a full 85% strongly agreed or agreed that their organizations were bad at problem diagnosis, and 87% strongly agreed or agreed that this flaw carried significant costs. Fewer than one in 10 said they were unaffected by the issue. The pattern is clear: Spurred by a penchant for action, managers tend to switch quickly into solution mode without checking whether they really understand the problem.

It has been 40 years since Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Jacob Getzels empirically demonstrated the central role of problem framing in creativity. Thinkers from Albert Einstein to Peter Drucker have emphasized the importance of properly diagnosing your problems. So why do organizations still struggle to get it right

Via David Hain, Anne-Laure Delpech
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The example of the "slow elevator" underscores a need to reframe what we think problems are. Putting up a mirror is a different way of understanding the problem, as is staggering lunches to reduce peak demands.

What are different ways to look at how schools operate? Might there be old ways i.e. multi-grade classrooms, community schools, changing times, etc?
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Nelly Renard's curator insight, June 14, 12:34 PM
It has been 40 years since Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi and Jacob Getzels empirically demonstrated the central role of problem framing in creativity. Thinkers from Albert Einstein to Peter Drucker have emphasized the importance of properly diagnosing your problems. So why do organizations still struggle to get it right
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, June 15, 5:40 AM

Interesting question.  Too often I think the answer is NO!

Ian Berry's curator insight, June 19, 6:45 PM
I see three opportunities when solving problems. One is framing as this article suggests The other two are solving the underlying cause and secondly taking the opportunity to innovate. Most problem solving returns the status quo instead of moving to a higher level through innovation
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#HR What's the best-kept secret of leadership?

#HR What's the best-kept secret of leadership? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Can you make the two columns of numbers add up to the same total by swapping just two cards? (Take extra credit if you can solve it without looking up the answer online. Take extra credit if you’re savvy enough to find the answer online.)  

Via Kevin Watson, Ricard Lloria, malek
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The three key points are interesting: stop giving feedback unless requested, stop conducting one-on-one meetings, and stop motivating people.

In teaching, teachers are often treated as if they are irresponsible and unable to make choices themselves. The essential piece is to allow teachers to act autonomously and responsibly in seeking feedback. I subscribe to the idea that I want to be a teacher. It is a calling. I don't need someone intervening to motivate me. The challenge was/is most of the feedback was useless and demotivating.
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Ian Berry's curator insight, June 14, 8:29 PM
All 3 suggestions work very well in my observation
Begoña Pabón's curator insight, June 19, 2:02 AM
¿Conoces el secreto mejor guardado del verdadero liderazgo?...