Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Taming the mammoth: Stop caring what other people think

Taming the mammoth: Stop caring what other people think | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Part 2: Taming the Mammoth
 
Some people are born with a reasonably tame mammoth or raised with parenting that helps keep the mammoth in check. Others die without ever reining their mammoth in at all, spending their whole lives at its whim. Most of us are somewhere in the middle—we’ve got control of our mammoth in certain areas of our lives while it wreaks havoc in others. Being run by your mammoth doesn’t make you a bad or weak person—it just means you haven’t yet figured out how to get a grip on it. You might not even be aware that you have a mammoth at all or of the extent to which your Authentic Voice has been silenced.

Whatever your situation, there are three steps to getting your mammoth under your control:

Step 1: Examine Yourself

The first step to improving things is a clear and honest assessment of what’s going on in your head, and there are three parts of this:

1) Get to know your Authentic Voice

This doesn’t sound that hard, but it is. It takes some serious reflection to sift through the webs of other people’s thoughts and opinions and figure out who the real you actually is. You spend time with a lot of people—which of them do you actually like the most? How do you spend your leisure time, and do you truly enjoy all parts of it? Is there anything you regularly spend money on that you don’t feel that comfortable with? How does your gut really feel about your job and relationship status? What’s your true political opinion? Do you even care? Do you pretend to care about things you don’t just to have an opinion? Do you secretly have an opinion on a political or moral issue you don’t ever voice because people you know will be outraged?

There are cliché phrases for this process—”soul-searching” or “finding yourself”—but that’s exactly what needs to happen. Maybe you can reflect on this from whatever chair you’re sitting in right now or from some other part of your normal life—or maybe you need to go somewhere far away, by yourself, and step out of your life in order to effectively examine it. Either way, you’ve got to figure out what actually matters to you and start being proud of whoever your Authentic Voice is.

2) Figure out where the mammoth is hiding
 
Most of the time a mammoth is in control of a person, the person’s not really aware of it. But you can’t make progress if you’re not crystal clear about where the biggest problem areas are.

The most obvious way to find the mammoth is to figure out where your fear is—where are you most susceptible to shame or embarrassment? What parts of your life do you think about and a dreadful, sinking feeling washes over you? Where does the prospect of failure seem like a nightmare? What are you too timid to publicly try even though you know you’re good at it? If you were giving advice to yourself, which parts of your life would clearly need a change that you’re avoiding acting on right now?

The second place a mammoth hides is in the way-too-good feelings you get from feeling accepted or on a pedestal over other people. Are you a serious pleaser at work or in your relationship? Are you terrified of disappointing your parents and do you choose making them proud over aiming to gratify yourself? Do you get too excited about being associated with prestigious things or care too much about status? Do you brag more than you should?

A third area the mammoth is present is anywhere you don’t feel comfortable making a decision without “permission” or approval from others. Do you have opinions you’re regurgitating from someone else’s mouth, which you’re comfortable having now that you know that person has them? When you introduce your new girlfriend or boyfriend to your friends or family for the first time, can those people’s reaction to your new person fundamentally change your feelings for him/her? Is there a Puppet Master in your life? If so, who, and why?

3) Decide where the mammoth needs to be ousted
 
It’s not realistic to kick the mammoth entirely out of your head—you’re a human and humans have mammoths in their head, period. The thing we all need to do is carve out certain sacred areas of our lives that must be in the hands of the AV and free of mammoth influence. There are obvious areas that need to be made part of the AV’s domain like your choice of life partner, your career path, and the way you raise your kids. Others are personal—it comes down to the question, “In which parts of your life must you be entirely true to yourself?”

Step 2: Gather Courage by Internalizing that the Mammoth Has a Low IQ

Real Woolly Mammoths were unimpressive enough to go extinct, and Social Survival Mammoths aren’t any better. Despite the fact that they haunt us so, our mammoths are dumb, primitive creatures who have no understanding of the modern world. Deeply understanding this—and internalizing it—is a key step to taming yours. There are two major reasons not to take your mammoth seriously:

1) The mammoth’s fears are totally irrational.

5 things the Mammoth is incorrect about:

→ Everyone is talking about me and my life and just think how much everyone will be talking about it if I do this risky or weird thing.

Here’s how things actually are:

No one really cares that much about what you’re doing. People are highly self-absorbed.

→ If I try really hard, I can please everyone.

Yes, maybe in a 40-person tribe with a unified culture. But in today’s world, no matter who you are, a bunch of people will like you and a bunch of other people won’t. Being approved of by one type of person means turning another off. So obsessing over fitting in with any one group is illogical, especially if that group isn’t really who you are. You’ll do all that work, and meanwhile, your actual favorite people are off being friends with each other somewhere else.

→ Being disapproved of or looked down upon or shit-talked about has real consequences in my life.

Anyone who disapproves of who you’re being or what you’re doing isn’t even in the same room with you 99.7% of the time. It’s a classic mammoth mistake to fabricate a vision of future social consequences that is way worse than what actually ends up happening—which is usually nothing at all.

→ Really judgy people matter.

Here’s how judgy people function: They’re highly mammoth-controlled and become good friends with and date other judgy people who are also highly mammoth-controlled. One of the primary activities they do together is talk shit about whoever’s not with them—maybe they feel some jealousy, and eye-rolling disapproval helps them flip the script and feel less jealous, or maybe they’re not jealous and use someone as a vehicle for bathing in schadenfreude—but whatever the underlying feeling, the judging serves to feed their hungry mammoth.
 
When people shit-talk, they set up a category division of which they’re always on the right side. They do this to prop themselves up on a pedestal that their mammoth can chomp away on.

Being the material a judgy person uses to feel good about themselves is a fairly infuriating thought—but it has no actual consequences and it’s clearly all much more about the judgy person and their mammoth problem than it is about you. If you find yourself making decisions partially based on not being talked badly about by a judgy person, think hard about what’s actually going on and stop.

→ I’m a bad person if I disappoint or offend the person/people who love me and have invested so much in me.

No. You’re not a bad person for being whoever your Authentic Voice is in your one life. This is one of those simple things—if they truly selflessly love you, they will for sure come around and accept everything once they see that you’re happy. If you’re happy and they still don’t come around, here’s what’s happening: their strong feelings about who you should be or what you should do are their mammoth talking, and their main motivation is worrying about how it’ll “look” to other people who know them. They’re allowing their mammoth to override their love for you, and they should be adamantly ignored.

Two other reasons why the mammoth’s fearful obsession with social approval makes no sense:

A) You live here:
 
So who gives a fuck about anything?

B) You and everyone you know are going to die. Kind of soon.
 
So like…

The mammoth’s fears being irrational is one reason the mammoth has a low IQ. Here’s the second:

2) The mammoth’s efforts are counterproductive.

The irony of the whole thing is that the obsessive lumbering mammoth isn’t even good at his job. His methods of winning approval may have been effective in simpler times, but today, they’re transparent and off-putting. The modern world is an AV’s world, and if the mammoth wants to thrive socially, he should do the thing that scares him most—let the AV take over.

Here’s why:

AVs are interesting. Mammoths are boring. Every AV is unique and complex, which is inherently interesting. Mammoths are all the same—they copy and conform, and their motives aren’t based on anything authentic or real, just on doing what they think they’re supposed to do. That’s supremely boring.

AVs lead. Mammoths follow. Leadership is natural for most AVs, because they draw their thoughts and opinions from an original place, which gives them an original angle. And if they’re smart and innovative enough, they can change things in the world and invent things that disrupt the status quo. If you give someone a paintbrush and an empty canvas, they might not paint something good—but they’ll change the canvas in one way or another.

Mammoths, on the other hand, follow—by definition. That’s what they were built to do—blend in and follow the leader. The last thing a mammoth is going to do is change the status quo because it’s trying so hard to be the status quo. When you give someone a paintbrush and canvas, but the paint is the same exact color as the canvas, they can paint all they want, but they won’t change anything.

People gravitate toward AVs, not mammoths. The only time a mammoth-crazed person is appealing on a first date is when they’re on the date with another mammoth-crazed person. People with a strong AV see through mammoth-controlled people and aren’t attracted to them. A friend of mine was dating a great on-paper guy a while back but broke things off because she couldn’t quite fall for him. She tried to articulate why, saying he wasn’t weird or special enough—he seemed like “just one of the guys.” In other words, he was being run too much by a mammoth.

This also holds among friends or colleagues, where AV-run people are more respected and more magnetic—not because there’s necessarily anything extraordinary about them, but because people respect someone with the strength of character to have tamed their mammoth.
 
Step 3: Start Being Yourself

This post was all fun and games until “start being yourself” came into the picture. Up to now, this has been an interesting reflection into why humans care so much what other people think, why that’s bad, how it’s a problem in your life, and why there’s no good reason it should continue to plague you. But actually doing something after you finish reading this article is a whole different thing. That takes more than reflection—it takes some courage.
 
But courage against what, exactly? As we’ve discussed, there’s no actual danger involved in being yourself—more than anything, it just takes an Emperor Has No Clothes epiphany, which is as simple as this:

Almost nothing you’re socially scared of is actually scary.

Absorbing this thought will diminish the fear that you feel, and without fear, the mammoth loses some power.

With a weakened mammoth, it becomes possible to begin standing up for who you are and even making some bold changes—and when you watch those changes turn out well for you with few negative consequences and no regrets, it reinforces the epiphany and an empowered AV becomes a habit. Your mammoth has now lost its ability to pull the strings, and it’s tamed.
 
The mammoth is still with you—it’ll always be with you—but you’ll have an easier time ignoring or overruling it when it speaks up or acts out, because the AV is the alpha dog now. You can start to relish the feeling of being viewed as weird or inappropriate or confusing to people, and society becomes your playground and blank canvas, not something to grovel before and hope for acceptance from.

Making this shift isn’t easy for anyone, but it’s worth obsessing over. Your Authentic Voice has been given one life—and it’s your job to make sure it gets the opportunity to live it.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This would be helpful in classrooms.

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, June 24, 2014 11:23 AM

Good post on finding your true self and living your own life free from your "mammoth." Click on the link or image above to view the original post with lots of cute pics. ~ V. B.

Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 2014 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 2014 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
Alan Jordan's curator insight, April 3, 2016 4:13 PM

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Why Smart People Don't Multitask - Multitasking Lowers IQ, Impairs Cognitive Processing

Why Smart People Don't Multitask - Multitasking Lowers IQ, Impairs Cognitive Processing | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
You may have heard that multitasking is bad for you, but new studies show that it kills your performance and may even damage your brain. Every time you multitask you aren't just harming your performance in the moment; you may very well be damaging an area of your brain that's critical to your future success at work.

Research conducted at Stanford University found that multitasking is less productive than doing a single thing at a time. The researchers found that people who are regularly bombarded with several streams of electronic information cannot pay attention, recall information, or switch from one job to another as well as those who complete one task at a time.

A Special Skill?

But what if some people have a special gift for multitasking? The Stanford researchers compared groups of people based on their tendency to multitask and their belief that it helps their performance. They found that heavy multitaskers—those who multitask a lot and feel that it boosts their performance—were actually worse at multitasking than those who like to do a single thing at a time. The frequent multitaskers performed worse because they had more trouble organizing their thoughts and filtering out irrelevant information, and they were slower at switching from one task to another.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
It takes time to refocus, so the supposed efficiencies are eliminated. As well, we do not attend to the people in front of us and the tasks at hand.
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Can teachers use learning as their pallet?

Can teachers use learning as their pallet? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings December 29, 2016 Can teachers use learning as their pallet?   I wrote the basics of this article nearly twelve years ago and at the time was thinking of an artist friend who was trying to define her art as well as searching for her own meaning in life. My friend often reflects…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
"I was thinking back several years to a teacher searching the closet for teacher’s manuals and transparencies to teach a subject they had taught for forty years. I was a bit taken back. How do you teach a subject for forty years and now get stressed over a manual and transparencies. You should know the material and it should not be the exact same for every class. The delivering of the material is the key issue here. I was curious as I watched and observed the mounting stress for this teacher as no teacher’s manual and transparencies could be found. Fortunately for the students their regular teacher made it back in time."

We should teach day and moment as if they are new, because they are. Having said this, it is important that teachers be teachers. There are some (too many) looking at it as a job, not a vocation and passion.
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Wanted: Substitute teachers for Michigan classrooms

Shortages of substitute teachers are happening largely because fewer people are pursuing teaching as a career

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is an ominous sign. Instead of privatizing schools, politicians might want to show some backbone and realize there are issues that can only be solved (if they can be) at the local level
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The Akrasia Effect: Why We Don’t Follow Through on Things

The Akrasia Effect: Why We Don’t Follow Through on Things | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The ancient Greek term "akrasia" helps explain why we don't follow through on things. Read this article to learn how akrasia works and what to do about it.

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Procrastination is not good, but it happens for good reasons. We think we have other important things to do.
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The Atlantic’s 16 Best Education Stories from 2016

The Atlantic’s 16 Best Education Stories from 2016 | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Take a stroll down memory lane, a scroll through some #TBTs, or whatever the school kids are calling a throwback these days. Here are our favorite education stories The Atlantic published this year.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
These will take time to read through and fully digest.
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Bosses, take note! Men are more likely to quit their jobs due to bullying at workplace - The Economic Times on Mobile

Bullying often causes women to go on prolonged sick leave or use antidepressants. - The Economic Times on Mobile
Via george_reed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I wonder why? That was a reason I left teaching. I could take care of myself, but it was hard to watch others be bullied.
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george_reed's curator insight, December 22, 2016 1:17 PM
This is an interesting teaser. Additional research is necessary on gender differences when it comes to the impact of toxic leadership.
 
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The Best Collections Of Education Research – 2016 via @LarryFerlazzo

The Best Collections Of Education Research – 2016 via @LarryFerlazzo | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I do lots of posts about education research, including my own year-end “round-up.” Other places have begun to do the same thing, so I thought I’d create another “Best”…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
There are some good links here.
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Emily Dickinson Eternal: “I’m Nobody! Who are you?”

Emily Dickinson Eternal: “I’m Nobody! Who are you?” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It seems an odd thing to celebrate the birth day of someone long deceased, someone we have immortalized, in a way, as the British Romantic poets desired: "Ah, happy, happy boughs! that cannot shed /Your leaves, nor ever bid the Spring adieu," John Keats exclaims in celebration of the immutability of art—the recreation of foliage…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
When we teach poetry, it is a hermeneutic experience for each person.
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Chart: What Great Leaders say to Engage Teams

Chart: What Great Leaders say to Engage Teams | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Anne-Laure Delpech
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Thank you and please are great starters. Besides saying things, what leaders lead with their actions.
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Abidine A.'s curator insight, November 27, 2016 5:58 AM

Le choix de mots par un leader

Susanna Lavialle's curator insight, December 9, 2016 5:31 PM
Nice
Zeb WATURUOCHA, PhD's curator insight, December 23, 2016 10:00 PM
Share your insight
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Self fulfilling prophecies

Self fulfilling prophecies | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
learning, technology, education, steve, wheeler, social media, internet, mobile, school, teachers

Via Marta Torán, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Self-fulfilling prophecis in schools are like echo chambers where everyone speaks the same way and agrees with the most powerful voice. We just saw evidence of it in the American election.
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Marta Torán's curator insight, December 16, 2016 1:11 PM

Teorías de Aprendizaje-> El efecto Pigmalion

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The Most Important Things Schools Don’t Do – A challenge to Australia’s Educatio MinisterThe Most Important Things Schools Don’t Do – A challenge to Australia’s Education Minister

The Most Important Things Schools Don’t Do – A challenge to Australia’s Educatio MinisterThe Most Important Things Schools Don’t Do – A challenge to Australia’s Education Minister | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
PLEASE SEND THIS ON TO YOUR STATE MINISTER. TREEHORN DOES NOT HAVE READY ACCESS TO THEM OR THEIR DEPARTMENTS. Treehorn Express A CHALLENGE TO STATE MINISTERS This week, the collective wisdom of Australia’s education system gathers to consider what can be done to ensure that Australia has the world’s best  system of schooling.  It’s a…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Student learning is always grounded in the immediate time and place they exist in. That is what makes teachers essential to student learning.
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We Can't Teach As Fast As Things Change

We Can't Teach As Fast As Things Change | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By things I mean information. Perspectives. Ideologies. What’s socially acceptable and what’s not. Our collective cultural biases & intellectual prejudices.

Via Dr. Susan Bainbridge, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The title says a lot.
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DNL's curator insight, December 16, 2016 5:04 AM
Broodje aap, zou prof. Kirschner zeggen.. 
Claudia Andrade's curator insight, December 18, 2016 9:19 AM
In that case, we must acquire the fundamentals of knowledge to deal with fast change such as digital culture, pedagogy or thinking. 
Inés Solá's curator insight, January 5, 2:08 PM
Estoy de acuerdo, no limitemos a los niños a nuestras ideas, pensamientos o creencias 
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Why Academic Teaching Doesn’t Help Kids Excel In Life

Why Academic Teaching Doesn’t Help Kids Excel In Life | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Teacher Shelley Wright explains why a school system that revolves around academics fails to teach kids what they really need to know. Students have many talents
Via Mr. Meade
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
All teaching is academic. The question is what is worth teaching? This is a question many have asked (Dewey, Pinar, Montessori, etc.) over the years. I think dispositions and habits in a John Dewey way are critical.
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Forgiveness: The Least Understood Leadership Trait In The Workplace

Forgiveness: The Least Understood Leadership Trait In The Workplace | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Today, people think for themselves, especially in the entrepreneurial arena. Less really is more when it comes to building extraordinary organizations. Give people a dream that they can wrap their head and heart around, get out of the way, and let them run!

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D., Bobby Dillard, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
It is the least understood of human traits. It is essential in each relationship we are in.
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Andy Webb's curator insight, December 5, 2016 7:22 PM
Poignant article that reminds us to be human to those we lead.
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Democratic Schooling

Democratic Schooling | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I have argued in speech and writing for years that democracy is not “natural.” Although it is well within our human capacities it is not our “default” position. To demonstrate this would take longer than this blog/web allows. But I think there are good solid reasons why as a specie we retreat to authoritarian solutions…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
"The first reform I would make if I were … what? – is that every publicly funded school (and maybe institution) must develop a plan of governance that can be defended as explicitly democratic and where those most affected have the freedom to make important decisions with the fewest possible exceptions. In Catholic theology this is called “subsidiarity.” Yes, there must be exceptions laid down by larger and broader based governing bodies (like a locally elected school board,"

Public schools are grassroots institutions. It is the local community that informs the needs of its school, rather than distant bureaucrats and politicians.
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Opening A Charter School Without Knowing The Facts: The Elephant In The Room // Missouri Education Watchdog

Opening A Charter School Without Knowing The Facts: The Elephant In The Room // Missouri Education Watchdog | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"This is not about whether you are a fan of charter schools or choice. This is, however, an interesting case about transparency and accountability." 
http://missourieducationwatchdog.com/opening-a-charter-school-without-knowing-the-facts-the-elephant-in-the-room/ ;


Via Roxana Marachi, PhD, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Schools are being targeted by big money. If they succeed, what does it mean for democracy. The Waltons operate on the premise that they can pay employees little and government will take care of them. Trump appointed a charter school supporter to be Secretrary of Education
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Teaching Tidbits: Teaching Is Like a Sushi Roll

Teaching Tidbits: Teaching Is Like a Sushi Roll | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Anabel Gonzalez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
This is an interesting metaphor to consider. It is actually a simile.
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Why Walt Whitman Called America the 'Greatest Poem'

Why Walt Whitman Called America the 'Greatest Poem' | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The 19th-century writer believed that the power of poetry and democracy came from an ability to make a unified whole out of disparate parts.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
In the early part of the 21st Century, do we need another Walt Whitman to bridge the gap between democracy and poetry?
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Want to Be a Good Boss? Start by Understanding Why You Want to Lead

Want to Be a Good Boss? Start by Understanding Why You Want to Lead | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“ Research explores the pros and cons of two distinct leadership styles.”
Via Brad Parcells, Aperio Coaching & Consulting, LLC, Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
It is a bit of an oversimiplication to thin there are only two forms of leadership. Maybe that is why people vote the way they do? Where does servant leadership fit?
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Education Readings December 9th

Education Readings December 9th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz Taking the PISA New Zealand teacher Mike Boon (aka Boonman) ‘Well, friends, today was PISA day. The day when all media outlets around the world breathlessly pronounce their education system is either “plummeting” down the…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Using standardized tests to measure and quantify humans as if they are objects, is dehumanizing.
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Black Professor Gives Epic Response to White Student Who Proclaimed Slavery Was 'a Positive Thing' - Atlanta Black Star

Black Professor Gives Epic Response to White Student Who Proclaimed Slavery Was 'a Positive Thing' - Atlanta Black Star | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A Black educator from Cleveland, Ohio, gave a white student quite the virtual talking-to after he outrageously wrote that slavery was “actually a positive thing” because it taught Black people to fight for who they are.

Via Elizabeth E Charles
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
I cannot think of anything postive that comes from oppressing others.
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The Unbearable Lightness of Lying: Renaming What We Value, Fear

The Unbearable Lightness of Lying: Renaming What We Value, Fear | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"Who is more to be pitied," muses artist and main character Rabo Karabekian in Kurt Vonnegut's Bluebeard, "a writer bound and gagged by policemen or one living in perfect freedom who has nothing more to say?" As in most of Vonnegut's fiction, there is a tension of tone between the narration and the weight of the…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
A key point in the post is how under totalatarian regimes people grow to fear each other. This happens under the veneer of supposedly democratic regimes.
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13 Leadership Skills You Didn't Need A Decade Ago That Are Now Essential

13 Leadership Skills You Didn't Need A Decade Ago That Are Now Essential | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Leadership skills aren't stagnant. Different generations moving in and out of the workforce dictate changes to the way people lead.

Via David Hain, Ron McIntyre, Bobby Dillard, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Leadership is always changing and transforming.
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David Hain's curator insight, December 15, 2016 2:54 AM

Misleading headline, bathes trends have become more critical in recent times.

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Play in education / John Dewey / teacher stress / critical thinking / the Corporate takeover of education and the destructive impact of political agendas

Play in education / John Dewey / teacher stress / critical thinking / the Corporate takeover of education and the destructive impact of political agendas | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Merry Christmas to you all Education Reading s By Allan Alach Another year is ending , which means in New Zealand an
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
A teacher told me that play should be infused in all grades. The article on play struck a chord with me. Also the John Dewey article is worth reading.
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Education Readings December 16th

Education Readings December 16th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach Another year is ending, which means in New Zealand and Australia, it’s also the end of the school year, and time for teachers and children to have a long summer break away from the trials of teaching and learning. Make the most of the break - it’s the only real chance teachers…
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
What does a post-truth world mean for teachers? I am not sure what a post-truth world is, but clearly teachers need to deal with this.
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