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The Death of Planning Expertise

The Death of Planning Expertise | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Yesterday a friend of mine sent me this article written by a city planner talking about the death of planning expertise.

Via YACOUBAHIEN
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We are planning for uncertain futures we cannot predict based on the needs of today. This is happening in school planning and yet we promote new schools as cutting edge. Are they?

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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The Global Search for Education: What's the Secret to Canada's Success? - Huffington Post

The Global Search for Education: What's the Secret to Canada's Success? - Huffington Post | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"Effects of socio-economic status on educational outcomes can be mitigated, and this can be done on a whole-school and system-wide basis by the very people and the same schools where low performance was once the norm.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These three points seem important to the supposed turn-around:

 

Supporting and mentoring the principal as instructional leader by focusing on the further development of core leadership capacities, practices and competencies;Providing job-embedded professional learning for staff with a focus on improvement and enhancement of teaching and learning, including providing time for staff to learn from each other;Improving achievement outcomes for students, particularly those who do not appear to be on track to graduate.

 

I say supposed, because when we look inside the numbers this is not Canadian and their are communities left out. What does it mean to graduate?

 

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I believe in the 70:20:10 framework

I believe in the 70:20:10 framework | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Charles Jennings promotes a 70:20:10 framework for organizational learning, where on-the-job experiential/informal learning and social learning represent the preponderance of each employee’s overall learning. Only 10% is from formal learning activities.

 

The reason this framework works is that it more or less reflects what’s actually true for employees in the typical workplace. Formal education has its place in preparing people for the workplace. Once those people become employees, they have a job to get done. People aren’t hired to learn, they’re hired to increase productivity or capability. There are productivity expectations and organizational needs to be met.

 


Via juandoming, Edumorfosis, Jim Lerman, Miloš Bajčetić, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

School is a challenging place to learn to be a teacher. We are often isolated and it is difficult to learn informally.

 

The concept is great and it takes effort to put it in place.

 

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María Dolores Díaz Noguera's curator insight, December 20, 3:40 PM

Agente de Cambio Que ayuda a Fortalecer el foco cultural de ... Alto Rendimiento y desarrollo continuo ...I believe in the 70:20:10 framework | @scoopit via @edumorfosis http://sco.lt/...

june holley's curator insight, December 21, 8:28 AM

True for networks too?

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65 Quotes That Will Dare You to Do Great Things

65 Quotes That Will Dare You to Do Great Things | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

If we are to do great things we must always be motivated to take bold risks. If you're feeling timid or uncertain, find the inspiration to do what you are meant to do


Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Lao Tzu and Mark Twain begin the list.

 

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kelvinsmim's curator insight, December 19, 11:29 PM

bmw 318i alternator

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8 Surprising Ways Music Affects the Brain

8 Surprising Ways Music Affects the Brain | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I’m a big fan of music, and use it a lot when working, but I had no idea about how it really affects our brains and bodies. Since music is such a big part of our lives, I thought it would be interesting and useful to have a look at some of the ways we react to it without even realizing.

“Without music, life would be a mistake” – Friedrich Nietzsche

Of course, music affects many different areas ...

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Using music for learning is productive.

 

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Zinn Education Project

Zinn Education Project | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Free lessons and resources for teaching people’s history in K-12 classrooms. For use with books by Howard Zinn and others on multicultural, women’s, and labor history.

Via Christopher Tienken
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting site with resources.

 

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leading and learning: Education Readings - Reflections/last reading for 2014

leading and learning: Education Readings - Reflections/last reading for 2014 | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Here are some more links to educational articles.

 

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Five big education stories in 2014

Five big education stories in 2014 | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We've had plenty to talk about in 2014 -- from Common Core to teachers unions to Chromebooks and blended learning.
Here are five big education stories that kept my attention all year long.
What's on your list?

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The one that caught my attention was the one about making a great teacher. This is such a modernistic way of expressing it. Teachers form. They are guided, self-reflect, and converse. Or, they should. Maybe the difficulty is we still think we make teachers and they are a product. That is so Platonic.

 

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The Case for Group Work - Blackboard Blog

The Case for Group Work - Blackboard Blog | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Students hate group work. They’re vocal about it, too; check out a search for “group work” on Twitter, and you’ll see many, many complaints.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Group and collaborative work is important in education as it is in life.

 

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Students deliver wish list to school board. There’s one item on it.

Students deliver wish list to school board. There’s one item on it. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Students ask Pittsburgh School Board to restore cuts to arts education.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The arts, including poetry, sculpting, dance, music, etc., stimulate.

 

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Why riding the wave of discomfort is good for you

Why riding the wave of discomfort is good for you | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In our modern world, discomfort is considered a terrible thing. If not terrible, at least a thing of the past. Dishwashers, washing machines, computers, remote controls—yes, they add convenience, but also a level of comfort our forefathers did not enjoy. Pain of any kind thwarts happiness, we tend to reason, and so anything that compromises our ability to feel good must be bad (who hasn’t seen a commercial for a pain reliever?) But that’s also particularly true for our careers. Success feels great, not lousy! Such a view, however, is in the eye of the beholder. And it may blind us to unforeseen opportunities. "Suffering from the world" Artists throughout history have consistently courted suffering, instinctively if not consciously, to produce works that explore the darker recesses of the human condition. This was done, in part, because pain is a reality of life for everybody in some form at some time. Pain is something everybody can relate to. And pain makes a person very present. For such artists, to ameliorate or to deny pain would be to block the creative muses, that which drives them to explore and express. In fact, Germans have a term for this melancholia, “Weltschmerz”, which means “suffering from the world.” Writers, from Lord Byron to Kurt Vonnegut, have used the term to describe the psychological pain encountered along life’s roller-coaster journey. It was not to be avoided: it was to be understood, investigated, employed. When it comes to movies, box office receipts bear witness to the fact that we are drawn to brooding superheroes; the gleeful ones just don’t possess the adequate level of gravitas required to save the world or revolutionize it. (Think “Batman Begins”.) And while we may not want to feel anguish of any kind, we don’t mind seeing it in others, from the safety and comfort of the cinema or one’s own dreamy couch, if it evokes a profound revelation, or flashes of insight. When the pain can be viewed from a distance, one can more easily discern the value of the struggle. Yes, there is value. So I propose that discomfort is good for us. Or, put another way, it tells us that something needs to be addressed. It stretches us by forcing us to view our circumstances through a wholly different lens. Because we’re drawn to safety and security, we do our best to create cushy comfort zones for ourselves and our loved ones through the cars we drive, the homes we live in, and the places we work. But by resisting discomfort, we deny ourselves an important opportunity: the chance to shake ourselves out of our predictable perspectives and allow ourselves to make astute observations we could not possibly have made before. Discomfort gives us fresh eyes. Embracing ambiguity—and friction On my first day as Director of Marketing for a product design firm, I found out during my welcome meeting with Human Resources about another Director of Marketing at the firm. When I asked who reported to whom, my HR contact said: “To be honest, we’re still trying to figure that out.” I admit I felt discomfort at this news, more than what I felt I could handle—but it also immediately prepared me for the firm’s unique culture of ambiguity. Seven wonderful years followed. The creative ideas and innovative solutions that lead to coveted moments of illumination, and help to solve the thorny problems we encounter in life and on the job, don’t come from stasis. Harmony at work, for example, is good and can also spur productivity. But if it’s pursued purely for its own sake, it can function like blinders on a horse, directing our view—and our thinking—in only one direction. It can close us off to other possibilities. Sounds rather limiting, doesn’t it? Creative thinkers aren’t afraid of discomfort because it gives them greater perspective. It opens the door to approaches they’ve never tried, or even thought of. It increases the range of their problem-solving arsenal. Some simple ways to create moments of positive discomfort at work include: swapping desks or roles with colleagues; inviting a co-worker to lunch whom you’ve never met before; or improvising an ad-hoc voice-over on slides you have never seen before at a staff meeting. The point is: explore new methods and ways of thinking—constantly. This helps to normalize the feeling of discomfort, which stalls the inevitable pull of your comfort zone. I’m not suggesting self-inflicted pain to inspire creative thinking or problem-solving. But I do think we’d be better off when we’re not so quick to qualify the spells of discomfort that inevitably come our way as “bad”. See the discomfort as the potential opportunity it is. It’s telling us something. Unless there is a chronic condition, discomfort comes and goes. A wave in the ocean doesn’t last forever—we all know this. But surfers see the ephemeral beauty of waves and make the most of them. So should we.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Discomfort suggests something needs to be addressed. In a world where we make one more rule to avoid this, discomfort is about being curious and learning.

 

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, December 17, 8:36 PM
Temporary pain, suffering, and discomfort are opportunities for growth.
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Why Soft Skills Are Anything But Soft

Why Soft Skills Are Anything But Soft | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As the workplace becomes more virtual and collaborative, soft skills training is vital to the success of an organization.

Via Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D., Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The soft skills noted i.e. communicating are hard to learn and get us into complexity and messiness. They are not concrete and quantifiable therefore we discount them not for hard skills but skills we think we can count.

 

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Our Weekly Conversation about Teaching and Learning

Our Weekly Conversation about Teaching and Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In this the final post for 2014, I wanted to say thanks to those of you who take time to add comments after the posts. I don’t respond because I’ve had my say.

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The article raises an interesting question: "Do we know how to talk about teaching?"

 

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The Holy Grade: School Leadership is a Dangerous Business

The Holy Grade: School Leadership is a Dangerous Business | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Reblogged on WordPress.com

Via Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a link that takes one to the original post.

 

“Those who implement changes in assessment, grading, professional practices and policies risk not only confrontation, but also unpopularity, social isolation, public humiliation, and ultimately, even their livelihoods.”


I experienced the isolation for many years without even being aware of it. Being different in School is not a good place to be.


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How to Prevent Experts from Hoarding Knowledge - HBR

How to Prevent Experts from Hoarding Knowledge - HBR | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

". . .people who have been mentored themselves are much more likely to mentor others. In essence, a culture of mentoring becomes self-perpetuating."

 


Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I suspect the opening paragraph summarizes many realities. Most people want to translate "their knowledge" into some form of remuneration.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, December 20, 5:23 PM

It's not just leaving a legacy, but mentoring others and ensuring that what one has learned and established is passed on to others as a foundation for continuing to build means that the organization can continue to be healthy and productive.

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Teaching without Knowing, and Finding Problems to Solve

Teaching without Knowing, and Finding Problems to Solve | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
(Originally posted on the Edunautics blog) I've already written about one of the key paradigm shifts that I think needs to happen in education: education needs to be real. See "Online Education is ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Education in a sense has to do with the concept Bildung which is a forming process. We are being and becoming more skilled in the forming as we become more sensitive to the learning that is happening.

 

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How Mindful Children React Differently to Challenges (Illustrated)

How Mindful Children React Differently to Challenges (Illustrated) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

One thing I know from my work is that mindful children react differently to challenges. To show you exactly what I mean, I've created a few illustrations....


Via Jenny Ebermann
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This would be helpful in classrooms.

 

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Workplace performance: The only person who behaves sensibly is my tailor

Workplace performance: The only person who behaves sensibly is my tailor | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“The only person who behaves sensibly is my tailor. He takes new measurements every time he sees me. All the rest go on with their old measurements.”
—George Bernard Shaw

I’ve always enjoyed George Bernard Shaw’s writing. He was a man who made a great deal of sense to me. I started reading his books in my early teenage years and many of the ideas in them have stuck.

Shaw was a true Renaissance man - an Irish playwright and author, a Nobel Prize and Academy Award winner (how many can claim that double?) and a co-founder of the London School of Economics.

Shaw had a particular interest in education; from the way the state educates its children, where he argued that the education of the child must not be in “the child prisons which we call schools, and which William Morris called boy farms”; to the way in which education could move from teachers “preventing pupils from thinking otherwise than as the Government dictates” to a world where teachers should “induce them to think a little for themselves”.

Shaw was also a lifelong learner. Despite, or possibly because of, his own irregular early education he focused on learning as an important activity in life. He developed his thinking and ability through a discipline of reading and reflecting, through debating and exchanging ideas with others, and through lecturing. Apart from leaving a wonderful legacy of plays, political and social treatises, and other commentaries, Shaw also won the 1925 Nobel Prize for literature for “his work which is marked by both idealism and humanity, its stimulating satire often being infused with a singular poetic beauty". And, in 1938, the Academy Award for his screenplay for Pygmalion (later to be turned into the musical and film My Fair Lady after Shaw’s death. He hated musicals – some would say sensibly - and forbade any of his plays becoming musicals in his lifetime)

At 91 Shaw joined the British Interplanetary Society whose chairman at the time was Arthur C Clark (some interesting conversations there, I’m sure).

Shaw summed up his views on lifelong learning thus:

    "What we call education and culture is for the most part nothing but the substitution of reading for experience, of literature for life, of the obsolete fictitious for the contemporary real."

Shaw’s Tailor

In the statement about his tailor Shaw was simply making the point that change is a continuous process and part of life, and that we constantly need to recalibrate if we’re to gain an understanding of what’s really happening. If we do this we are more likely to have a better grasp of things and make the adjustments and appropriate responses needed. It’s the sensible approach.

Shaw and Work-Based Learning

I recently came across Shaw’s quote about sensibility and his tailor again in Joseph Raelin’s book ‘Work-Based Learning: Bridging Knowledge and Action in the Workplace’. Raelin’s work is something every L&D professional should read.

The quote started me thinking about the ways we measure learning and development in our organisations.

Effective Metrics for Learning and Development

I wonder what Shaw would think if he saw the way learning and development is predominantly measured in organisations today.

The most widely used measures for ‘learning’ are based on activity, not on outcomes. We measure how many people have attended a class or completed an eLearning module, or read a document or engaged in a job swap or in a coaching relationship.

Sometimes we measure achievement rates in completing a test or certification examination and call these ‘learning measures’.

The activity measures determine input, not output. The ‘learning’ measures usually determine short-term memory retention, not learning.

I am sure that Shaw would have determined we need to do better.

Outcomes not Activity

Even with today’s interest in the xAPI/TinCan protocol the predominant focus is still on measuring activity. It may be helpful to know that (noun, verb, object) ‘Charles did this’ as xAPI specifies. However extrapolating the context and outcomes to make any sense of this type of data requires a series of further steps that are orders of magnitude along the path to providing meaningful insight.

In many cases the activity measures simply serve to muddy the water rather than to reveal insights.

Attending a course or completing an eLearning module tells us little apart from the fact that some activity occurred. The same applies to taking part in a difficult workplace task or participating in a team activity.

Activity measurement does have some limited use. For instance when a regulatory body has defined an activity as a legal or mandatory necessity and requires organisations to report on those activities. these reports may help to keep a CEO out of the courts or jail. But this type of measurement is starting from the ‘wrong end’. A ‘learning activity is not necessarily an indicator of learning’ tag should be attached to every piece of this data.

There’s plenty of evidence beyond the anecdotal to support the fact that formal learning activity is not a good indicator of behaviour change (‘real learning’). For example a  study of 829 companies over 31 years showed diversity training had "no positive effects in the average workplace." The study reported that mandatory training sometimes has a positive effect, but overall has a negative effect.

    “There are two caveats about training. First, it does show small positive effects in the largest of workplaces, although diversity councils, diversity managers, and mentoring programs are significantly more effective. Second, optional (not mandatory) training programs and those that focus on cultural awareness (not the threat of the law) can have positive effects. In firms where training is mandatory or emphasizes the threat of lawsuits, training actually has negative effects on management diversity”

    Dobbin, Kalev, and Kelly
    Diversity Management in Corporate America
    2007, Vol. 6, Number 4
    American Sociological Association.

For further evidence as to the fact that training activity does not necessarily lead to learning (changed behaviour) we need look no further than the financial services industry. Did global financial services companies carry out regulatory and compliance training prior to 2008?  Of course they did – bucketsful of it. Did this training activity lead to compliant behaviour. Apparently not. It could be argued that without the training things could have been worse. However, there’s no easy way to know that. The results of banking behaviour and lack of compliance were bad enough to suggest the training had little impact. I suppose we could analyse, for example, the amount of time and budget spent per employee on regulatory and compliance training by individual global banks and assess this against the fines levied against them.  I doubt that there would be an inverse correlation.

(What is our response to the global financial crisis and the apparent failure of regulatory and compliance training? More regulatory and compliance training, of course!)

The Activity Measurement ‘Industry’

The ATD’s ‘State of the Industry’ report, which is published around this time of the year on an annual basis, is a case-in-point of the industry that has grown up around measuring ‘learning’ activity.

ATD has been producing this annual report for years (originally as the ASTD). The data presented in the ATD annual ‘State of the Industry’ report is essentially based around activity and input measurement – the annual spend on employee development, learning hours used per employee, expenditure on training as a percentage of payroll or profit or revenue, number of employees per L&D staff member and so on.

Some of these data points may be useful to help improve the efficient running of L&D departments and therefore of value to HR and L&D leaders, but many of the metrics and data are simply ‘noise’. They certainly should not be presented to senior executives as evidence of effectiveness of the L&D function.

To take an example from the ATD data, the annual report itemises ‘hours per year on ‘learning’ (which means ‘hours per year on training). The implicit assumption is that the more that are hours provided, the better and more focused the organisation is on developing its workforce.

But is it better for employees in an organisation be spending 49 hours per year on ‘learning’ than, say, 30 hours per year? These are figures from the 2014 ATD report.

Even if one puts aside the fact that as a species we are learning much of the time as part of our work and not just when we engage in organisationally designed activities that have a specific ‘learning’ tag, this is an important point worth considering.

It could be argued that organisations with the higher figure – 49 hours per year – are more focused on developing their people.  It could equally be argued that these organisations are less efficient at developing their people and simply take longer to achieve the same results. It could be further argued that the organisations spending more time training their people in trackable ‘learning’ events are simply worse at recruitment, hiring people who need more training than the ‘smart’ organisations that hire people with the skills and capabilities needed who don’t need much further training. We could dig further and ask whether spending 49 hours rather than 30 hours is indicative of poor selection of training ‘channel’ – that organisations with the higher number are simply using less efficient channels (classroom, workshop etc.) than others who may have integrated training activities more closely with the workflow (eLearning, ‘brown bag lunches’, on-the-job coaching etc.). Even further, is the organisation with the 49 hours per year simply stuck in the industrial age and using formal training as the only approach to attack the issue of building high performance – when it could (and should) be using an entire kitbag of informal, social, workplace and other approaches as well?

One could go on applying equally valid hypotheses to this data.The point is that activity data provides few if any insight into the effectiveness of learning and provides only limited insight into the efficiency of learning activities.

So why is there an obsession to gather this data?

Maybe we gather it because it is relatively easy to do so.

Maybe we gather it because the ‘traditional’ measurement models – based on time-and-motion efficiency measures – are deeply embedded. These time-honoured metrics developed for an industrial age are not the answer.  We need to use new approaches based on outcomes, not inputs...

 

*Click on the image or link to view the full post.*


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Each time we step into new teaching and learning, we should decide what that means and who it involves.

 

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, December 19, 2:18 PM

Insightful read on workplace learning and the training and development industry as a whole based on George Bernard Shaw's perspective. 

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Education Readings December 19th

Education Readings December 19th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach This will be last list of readings for this year. I’ll be taking a break until the end of January, but then will return, fully refreshed, to the fray. I wish you all a Merry Christma...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Some more readings for those who are interested.

 

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Interviews: Leadership and Followership

Interviews: Leadership and Followership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

When we think about leadership, we tend to focus almost entirely on the leader. Yet without followers, there is no leader. Leadership is participatory: leaders and followers exist in a mutually beneficial relationship where each adds to the effectiveness of the other.

Key to this process is listening, because leadership is as much about listening as it is about talking, or perhaps more so. From the beginning, a leader must be informed by the followers’ values, beliefs, and aspirations, the followers’ identity. The commitment gap people frequently experience, the difference between what the leader desires and what the followers actually do, can often be traced back to not aligning the elements of leaders’ and followers’ identities—who they think they are—to find common ground on which to function and grow.

In an article that appeared in the August 2007 issue of Scientific American Mind, titled “The New Psychology of Leadership,” authors Stephen D. Reicher, Michael J. Platow and S. Alexander Haslam present research supporting the idea that effective leaders—those who can move followers from one behavior to another—grasp what their followers believe they are and represent, and then create a shared identity. They write, “The development of a shared identity is the basis of influential and creative leadership. If you control the definition of reality, you can change the world.”


Via Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Derrida argued that absence suggests presence. Leadership suggests there are followers. If absence and presence co-exist and are somewhat interchangeable, can we say the same about leading and following?

 

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george_reed's curator insight, December 19, 12:22 PM

The Department of Leadership Studies at the University of San Diego recognized The New Psychology of Leadership as the best leadership book of the year. 

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The Best Bosses Double-Down on Respect and Listening

The Best Bosses Double-Down on Respect and Listening | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Leaders who get the most from their teams are those who rely on fear the least.

Via Anne Leong, george_reed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

They do and their listening is not to answer, but to genuinely listen.

 

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Bloom's revised Taxonomy with verbs!

Bloom's revised Taxonomy with verbs! | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
  Need some extra verbs? Here you go!           ~Mia

Via Mark E. Deschaine Ph.D.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an excellent infographic.

 

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Ivo Nový's curator insight, December 18, 12:12 AM

Some date are difficult to explain or to express with words. Here is another great example that infographic can be used.

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Video: New TEDx Talk By Carol Dweck

Video: New TEDx Talk By Carol Dweck | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Professor and researcher Carol Dweck recently gave a TEDx Talk shared by TED titled “The power of believing that you can improve.”
I’ve embedded it below, but you can also see it on the TED site at the previous link.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

An error should cause discomfort and begin the brain firing. It is a great opportunity to grow. After all, learning is about growth.

 

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Why Curiosity Enhances Learning

Why Curiosity Enhances Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

A neurological study has shown that curiosity makes our brains more receptive for learning, and that as we learn, we enjoy the sensation of learning.


Via ICTPHMS, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The Einstein quote is an excellent summary and introduction.

 

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Christine Macia Carter's curator insight, December 18, 1:41 PM

Curiosity!!!  Key to everything.

maria taveras's curator insight, December 18, 1:57 PM

It's a natural human phenomenon that occurs when our curiosity is activate and engaged learning and assimilation takes place. It's a creative dynamic that is essential to foster for our well being.

Lon Woodbury's curator insight, December 18, 3:45 PM

When a child drives you crazy with "Why?", I guess that is a good thing. :)  -Lon

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from educational implications
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How Much Practice is Too Much?

How Much Practice is Too Much? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

By Annie Murphy Paul Why do I have to keep practicing? I know it already!” That’s the familiar wail of a child seated at the piano or in front of the mu


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Once we think we have mastered something, the enjoyment of practice and performing continues to help develop the skill.

 

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Sharrock's curator insight, December 16, 6:35 PM
This has been the argument for practicing technical skills as one becomes an artist.
David Hain's curator insight, December 17, 4:36 AM

Keep on practicing, even after it seems the task has been learned. ~ Neuroscience study.

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leading and learning: End of year survey – tapping the wisdom of your class/school/community

leading and learning: End of year survey – tapping the wisdom of your class/school/community | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Notice the questions about people were asked about who they were, not what they were.

 

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