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Why It's Time To Rethink (And Question) Homework - Edudemic

Why It's Time To Rethink (And Question) Homework - Edudemic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The concept of homework as we have known it in the past is changing rapidly, since it often distorts the overall picture of learning. Flipped classrooms, the ability to use the same technology and tools both in and out of the classroom, and personalized learning are making ripples in the education world. And while most …

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Should homework be assigned? Is it part of extending the hidden curriculum to include 24/7 learning without awareness that is what is happening?

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Brad Merrick's curator insight, June 17, 8:00 AM

Where is homework positioned and what does it mean in a 24/7, technology driven world? The challenge has, and still is to rethink the paradigm, albeit an ever changing one. In a content free world , the notion of learnIng influences how we confirm understanding, and possibly redefines homework in tone trading all sense.

Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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8 Steps To Ensure Great Communication With Parents - Edudemic

8 Steps To Ensure Great Communication With Parents - Edudemic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As you’re preparing your lesson plans and classrooms for the first day of school (which may have already happened for some of you!), keeping in touch with parents is probably on your mind. Communicating classroom expectations and other pertinent information at the beginning of the school year is critical to get everyone started off on …

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Where I worked I communicated a lot with parents. This seemed to be a problem for the School managers who wanted to monitor and control the communication.

 

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Designing for Emergence: The Role of the Instructor in Student-Centered Learning

Designing for Emergence: The Role of the Instructor in Student-Centered Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
we seem to talk about instructor role so rarely that she becomes not only intangible, but at times invisible. Part of the problem seems to be that we’ve conflated instructor role with “authority,” and we’ve regarded authority as a dirty word

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Perhaps person-centred learning is a more apt way of understanding classrooms. The teacher is part of the larger whole and not separate. It might be a human and humane world can emerge from classrooms where humans live humanely.

 

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Expert panel: what makes a good teacher

Expert panel: what makes a good teacher | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Amid debates about teacher quality and training, and with the Teacher Education Ministerial Advisory Group soon to report on teacher education, we asked a panel of experts just what makes a good teacher…

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Although not all the "experts' used the word, relationships with students and revealing who we are as people is central to teaching. When we are in strong relationships with students, we shift the learning to them and it becomes their responsibilites in ways they enjoy.

 

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Expert performance and training: what we really know

Expert performance and training: what we really know | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Yet, in School teaching is treated as something those who do not do it are the most expert.

 

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On teacher pay

On teacher pay | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I talk about teaching an awful lot on this site, right?  Enough that there are people who have admitted to me that they regularly skip past posts on the topic.  (Which, for the record, is fine.  I'...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There was a time people went into teaching because it was a way to make a difference in the world. It paid well enough probably that it meant teachers remained in the profession. The article has an American view to it and things are done differently in the US, but there are issues in Alberta. For example, I felt the number of part-time teachers was on the increase. This does not stabilize the profession and will force young teachers to reconsider their choices. I met young teachers who held a second job out of necessity.

 

If School is important, does it not make sense that teachers would be compensated fairly?

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, August 21, 8:54 AM

We complain that classroom teachers don't do enough. We complain that classroom teachers aren't good enough. We do not treat this profession with the respect it deserves because we KNOW there are plenty of good if not excellent teachers who deserve our respect and our appreciation, and who deserve to get paid commensurate with their abilities, their education, their willingness to keep on learning and growing, and their patience in putting up with politicians, far too many school board members, and too many of the public who know so very little about what they actually do.

Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, August 21, 8:55 AM

We complain that classroom teachers don't do enough. We complain that classroom teachers aren't good enough. We do not treat this profession with the respect it deserves because we KNOW there are plenty of good if not excellent teachers who deserve our respect and our appreciation, and who deserve to get paid commensurate with their abilities, their education, their willingness to keep on learning and growing, and their patience in putting up with politicians, far too many school board members, and too many of the public who know so very little about what they actually do.

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Learning Theories: Adaptive Control of Thought

Learning Theories: Adaptive Control of Thought | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Learning Theories: Adaptive Control of Thought

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I agree with the last point. It is a simplified version of a complex theory. Having said this, it is a starting point.

 

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#Harper #Canada's Government Won't Let Its Own #Climate #Scientists Speak to the #Press

#Harper #Canada's Government Won't Let Its Own #Climate #Scientists Speak to the #Press | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Prime Minister Stephen Harper really doesn't like bad news about global warming.

Via CineversityTV
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is not unique for Harper and I am not a Harper fan and apologist. It is common place for politicians and managers to restrict what employees say. It happens in School continuously. We should be asking why publicly funded entities need PR people. Is it to sanitize messages?

 

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Back to School - Teacher resources on Pinterest

Back to School - Teacher resources on Pinterest | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We've gathered some useful resources for the all-encompassing back-to-school season. Enjoy!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I enjoy great quotes.

 

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Raising a Moral Child

Raising a Moral Child | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The tactics are different from those used for encouraging achievement.

Via Gust MEES, Amy Melendez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The research cited can carry over into School, as well. Raising children is about the effort of the village. @ivon_ehd1
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 14, 1:14 PM

This is hard to research, but a tentative conclusion would be to praise the character revealed rather than the actions. I think it is important to know the child and situations, but it makes a certain amount of sense.

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, April 14, 6:23 PM

Great linked-out presentation of research studies by NYT Sunday Review columnist Adam Grant.

Is this the model of research essay that we will be teaching in class after two more MLA updates?  ;-)

Ofelia Rita Casillas's curator insight, April 15, 4:02 PM

Children imitate what you do,not what you preach!

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#3 Tackle tough conversations

#3 Tackle tough conversations | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We all know the feeling - knowing that you need to have a difficult conversation with someone, but not wanting to jump in.  The longer you go on dreading it, the worse it gets.  So resolve to tackl...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first point is crucial. What do I need to know about my attitude and what can be changed about it? It does not mean we compromise things we value and think are valuable. It might provide greater insight into their importance.

 

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Back to School Messages

Back to School Messages | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here is a document from Jo with her 7 favorite messages to set positive classroom norms for the start of the school year.  The last page is a summary that you can post in your classroom.  Positive ...

Via Tom Perran
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The messages allow the beginnings of conversations which can lead to classroom norms continuously being negotiated.

 

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Tom Perran's curator insight, August 19, 6:13 PM

Back-to-school messages from Jo Boaler on setting a positive tone in the mathematics classroom this year. 

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TELL ME WHAT YOU PLAN TO DO WITH YOUR ONE WILD AND PRECIOUS LIFE - Mary Oliver

TELL ME WHAT YOU PLAN TO DO WITH YOUR ONE WILD AND  PRECIOUS LIFE - Mary Oliver | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Quote on a poster. Thick, durable, matte perfection, shouting out your message. Printed on archival, acid-free paper. Ships worldwide. Starting at $18

Via Ken Morrison
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mary Oliver is one of my favourite poets.

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How to Design Right-Sized Challenges

How to Design Right-Sized Challenges | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Design student projects that hit the sweet spot -- relevant to real life, challenging enough to be interesting, and achievable for diverse learners.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Playful spaces are important in learning. Keep it low tech is important for students. They accomplish so much when they can handle the projects and instructions.

 

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If A Child Is Off-Task…

If A Child Is Off-Task… | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
TEST If A Child Is Off-Task… by TeachThought Staff Quick-hitting thought someone sent to us via email recently that resonated with us: If a child is off-task, perhaps the problem is not the child, but the task –Alfie Kohn If a child is off task,...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Perhaps it is our perception of what it means to be off-task. Perhaps the student is fully on task and immersed in something important in their learning.

 

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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, August 21, 4:52 PM

That's all there is to say about that...

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Our Classroom Of Wisdom: 10 Statements of Affirmation

Our Classroom Of Wisdom: 10 Statements of Affirmation | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
TEST This Is Our Classroom Of Wisdom: 10 Statements of Affirmation by TeachThought Staff This is part one in our four-part “This is our classroom” series, one that will help you and your students take a look at your classroom as a “whole...

Via Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some good points. I would take some a step further. For example, it is not just about minimizing the separation between what we learn and how we live. There is no separation between those two things as is there is no separation between teaching, learning, and living.

 

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Susan Grigsby @sksgrigsby's curator insight, August 21, 5:22 PM

This is a piece I'll probably post on my wall...

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Why The Education Economy Is The Next Big Thing For The American Workforce

Why The Education Economy Is The Next Big Thing For The American Workforce | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How can integrating our educational system, our employers, and our job creators affect our modern economy?
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teacher and student disengagement is a symptom of larger problems in School. The idea that we think of School as part of some form of an education economy is part of the malaise. School requires substantial structural reforming and transforming. It is essential and not part of some neo-liberal agenda.

 

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Four-day week will cut absences, superintendent says

Copan Public Schools in northeastern Oklahoma is trying something new to attract teachers and reduce absences: a four-day week.

Though some districts have chosen this schedule to lower transportati
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is an interesting way to reduce transportation costs. Does it also mean teachers make less? Although that salary is not why teachers might teach, less salary might be an obstacle to attracting teachers.

 

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Elizabeth Green Tackles the Question; Are Teachers Born or Made?

Elizabeth Green Tackles the Question; Are Teachers Born or Made? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It’s hard to believe that there will ever be an answer to the question of whether teachers are “born” or “made.” As with the question of whether comedians or poets are born or made, the way that th...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We don't build teachers and I don't think they are born per se. Gert Biesta uses the word ordering. There are two types. One is external and it is part of the process of teachers becoming teachers. We are qualified and socialized into teacherhood. Unfortunately, many teachers stop here. The other form of ordering is internal. We make sense or attempt to make sense of what it means in continuously becoming this or that teacher per Gadamer. This is reflective work which works on the Parker Palmer question: "Who is the self that teaches?"

 

Can you imagine the challenge for those who do do not want to be in the classroom and perhaps never wanted to be there? I know a few people like that and they are now School managers and external experts.

 

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The McDonaldization of Education: the rise of slow

The McDonaldization of Education: the rise of slow | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Slow.  I love this word, and yet it tends to have many negative connotations  in education. Which is too bad because it's the very philosophy we need to save our education system, and give kids the...

Via Shawn Davids, Chris Wejr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

School's objective, as a subset of education, is not to create citizens and individuals. It involves the being and becoming of people, one person at a time. Teaching and learning are not flipping burgers by rote and fixed recipe. It is about engaging and meeting people where they are in their learning as people. This takes time and is patient work that can never be hurried. The late Ted Aoki used the word linger. David Jardine uses whiling over the worth of what we learn.

 

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Chris Wejr's curator insight, August 20, 2:11 PM

Would love to talk more about this as a staff... how do we slow down and go deeper in our classes?   Society moves so quickly - how can we help each other and our students to slow down in our learning and thinking?

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Leadership through conversations

Leadership through conversations | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

There is the adage, “Managers focus are results; leaders focus on people.” That really should be “leaders focus on results and people,” as in today’s hyper-competitive business environment, we must hit our financial goals or we may not keep our jobs. But how are we going to keep our good people energized and engaged if we don’t invest the time to know them as our team members and what is important to them?


Via donhornsby, Elysian Training
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leading and conversations are entangled. Pedagogy, as leading, is about engaging students in complex conversations about curricula. The curricula involved are planned and living. The latter belongs to the historical persons entering classrooms, including teachers, which filter the planned curricula.

 

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donhornsby's curator insight, August 20, 11:05 AM

(From the article): Senior managers spend up to 50% of their time in meetings, and much of their remaining time speaking with each other, on calls, and in front of their computers. Most of their communication is through e-mails and or is delegated to those who report to them.


We have to free ourselves up. We have to make our meetings shorter, more efficient and more productive, and then take the time for conversations with our people.

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Nine behaviors of people who positively impact the world

Nine behaviors of people who positively impact the world | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Look around you and you’ll see three kinds of people – those who hate their work, and complain bitterly, those who just tolerate their work and see it as a paycheck and aren’t looking for more (or feel they can’t have more), and finally, those who love their work, and relish it.  The third category is a small subset of all professionals globally, but this group stands out because these are, most often, the people who change the world for the better.

In my work as a success coach and writer, I’ve had the opportunity to connect with people who’ve made a true and measurable impact in the world, including well-known experts, authors, researchers, journalists, scientists, innovators, business geniuses, and entrepreneurs. But among this group of world influencers there are also everyday people who have found a special niche in which they’ve contributed at the highest level.

It’s critical to note that people who’ve made a real difference aren’t all privileged, advantaged or “special” by any stretch.  Many come from disadvantaged families, crushing circumstances and initially limited capabilities, but have found ways to pick themselves up and rise above their circumstances (and their genes) to transform their own lives and those around them.

Researching these makers, shakers and disruptors, and working with my own clients who shape the world around them in powerful and constructive ways, I’ve observed 9 core behaviors that set them apart – habitual ways of behaving and approaching life and work that distinguish them from those who long to make a difference but can’t or won’t find the way.

The 9 core behaviors of people who positively impact the world are:

They dedicate themselves to what gives their life meaning and purpose.

Thousands of people today don’t believe in meaning and purpose as something to discover or pursue in life.  And others believe in a life purpose but won’t take the risk to identify or honor it.  Those with positive influence feel otherwise.  They have found that there is a purpose to their life, and that purpose usually involves some aspect of turning their “mess into a message,” or using what they’ve learned (often the hard way) as a means of being of service to others.  People with a sense of purpose are driven, focused, committed, and lit up from the inside – unable to be deterred or distracted from what they believe is the reason they’re on this planet at this time. This sense of meaning and purpose gives them inexhaustible drive and offers guideposts to follow along the path.  It informs them of what they wish to attend to in life, and what they need to walk away from because it doesn’t support their higher purpose.

They commit to continually bettering themselves.

People who impact the world for the better know that they are not perfect. They understand how their knowledge isn’t “complete” – there are always gaps, biases, limitations and prejudices, and new places to go with their expertise.

Yes, there are powerful narcissists aplenty, but their influence isn’t positive or helpful in the long run – it’s damaging and destructive.  Innovators who positively shape the world come from a “beginner’s mind” and a loving, compassionate heart – with an openness to see, learn, and experience new things on the way to being a better servant of the world.

They engage with people in open, mutually-beneficial ways.

Those with huge positive influence understand the power of relationships, connection, and engaging with the world openly.  They’re not afraid to get “out there” – connecting with others, sharing their knowledge and talents, offering their authentic and often contrarian viewpoints and opinions.  They’ve pushed beyond any introversion, shyness or reluctance to be who they are, and have learned how to relate well with others and build mutually-supportive relationships that catapult both parties to a higher level.  They know that positive, supportive and authentic relationships are the foundational building blocks to anything and everything they want to achieve.

They invest time and energy not in what is, but what can be.

The people I’ve interacted with and interviewed who’ve made a positive impact in the world don’t settle for conformity.  When they see something that agitates and disturbs them, they strive to know more, get to the root of the issue, research and understand the contributing factors, and arrive at new solutions.  They observe gaps and mistakes in common thinking and behavior, and trust themselves in their belief that it’s time to push the boundaries of what’s accepted.   They want to affect change because they believe change will bring a better way to live.

They embrace critique.

The most powerful positive influencers don’t need or want to be “right” – they want to grow and be more effective.  For that to occur, they walk right into critique, and they embrace challenge.  They’re not afraid to put their work out there for others to poke holes in.   They are strong and confident in the face of opposition, yet know how to integrate constructive feedback to strengthen their work and ideas. They engage in open dialogue and welcome scrutiny.

They spread what they know.

We’ve all met authors or “experts” who keep their knowledge secret, close to the vest. They’re afraid to let it out for fear someone will steal it or make money on their ideas.  This is the opposite of the positive influencer’s mindset.  Those who make a true positive difference can’t help but share and teach what they’ve learned. They don’t see their knowledge as just some commodity to sell, as a meal ticket or a money maker – they see it as information that has to be shared with the world for its betterment. They believe their ideas and innovations are of use and value to others, and can’t help but share those openly, and teach others what they’ve learned.  They live the universal principle  – “the more you give, the more you get.”

They uplift others as they ascend.

You’ve experienced, as I have, scores of “leaders” and high-achievers who’ve gotten where they are by stepping on the heads and backs of those in the way.  These are not true leaders or influencers because their power is a sham – it was obtained unethically and is shallow and weak, and can’t be sustained over the long haul.   I have encountered power-mongers who were crushing and cruel to their subordinates and I wondered when they would finally reap what they’ve sown.  Over the long term, this day always comes.

On the other hand, people who positively impact the world not only obtain amazing results in their work, but their process of obtaining these results – how they operate in life — is also inspiring and uplifting.  They are happy to help and support others, and have an overflow of positive energy that enriches the lives of everyone they work with and connect with.  These positive influencers want others to grow.  They walk away from “success-building” opportunities that will be hurtful and damaging to others. They know that those unethical, demeaning or destructive approaches go against the very meaning and purpose they’re committed to.

They view the journey as the goal.

Positive influencers don’t take short cuts or go for the quick buck or easy answer. They don’t view some arbitrary goal or outcome as a destination, because they believe there is no end – it’s all in the journey.  It’s about what they’re learning, experiencing, and building that helps others, and for that, there is no defined end point.  They embrace failure more readily than others as “information” that guides them.  They are more fluid and flexible, and more open to the “how’s” because their ultimate goal is not about upholding their title, income, reputation, stature or power, but about new ways to help and share what they know.

They use their power and influence well.

Sadly, it’s a common occurrence in business today to witness power and influence being wielded as a weapon. It hurts and destroys. Positive influencers use their power well and wisely. They understand the widespread influence they have, the power they have to build up and elevate, or tear down.  Those who impact the world for the better are careful and judicious with their words, actions and behaviors. They operate with heart, and care deeply about their leadership and communication process and style, and the influence they have.  They take it seriously, as a special honor and responsibility not to be flaunted or misused.  They understand their special role, and accept it with grace, compassion, and care.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

They continually improve themselves is a great place to begin. This is not externally ordered and external ordering. It is something we undertake and emulate Gandhi's words of improving one's self and thus improving the world.

 

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Big Dog, Little Dog: Show Your Work

Big Dog, Little Dog: Show Your Work | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is an interesting article. The basis for the work is Nonaka and Takeuchi's classic work. It is business oriented more than School focused.

 

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Tinkering with Kids – Get in It for the Long Haul | MAKE

Tinkering with Kids – Get in It for the Long Haul | MAKE | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Why do we educators do it? It's fun enough tinkering around with projects on our own, so why must we bang our heads trying to involve a pack of screaming kids from the neighborhood? I've thought through this before, ...

Via Cammie Dunaway, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students love making things. I found we could set up projects in the classroom and students would finish them at home with parents supervising. I always clarified the parents' roles as supervisory. It worked well and students learned complex concepts more easily building projects.

 

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Cammie Dunaway's curator insight, March 24, 3:01 PM

Well said.  Working with Young Makers is equal parts frustration and inspiration.  But the lightbulb moments make it ultimately worthwhile!

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Maya Angelou on Courage and Facing Evil

Maya Angelou on Courage and Facing Evil | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"There is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic, because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing."

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Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need the courage to create ourselves daily. That is a wonderful quote which speaks to the roots of the word courage. Courage comes from coeur which means heart. We are on a daily journey and journey comes from the word journee which is not a measure of time but connotes the idea of journey in a timeless way.

 

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The Advantages of Dyslexia

The Advantages of Dyslexia | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
With reading difficulties can come other cognitive strengths

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"The trick that makes Escher’s drawings intriguing is a geometric construction psychologists refer to as an “impossible figure,” a line-form suggesting a three-dimensional object that could never exist in our experience. Psychologists, including a team led by Catya von Károlyi of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, have used such figures to study human cognition. When the team asked people to pick out impossible figures from similarly drawn illustrations that did not violate causality, they were surprised to discover that some people were faster at this than others. And most surprising of all, among those who were the fastest were those with dyslexia.

"Dyslexia is often called a “learning disability.” And it can indeed present learning challenges. Although its effects vary widely, children with dyslexia read so slowly that it would typically take them a half a year to read the same number of words other children might read in a day. Therefore, the fact that people who read so slowly were so adept at picking out the impossible figures was a big surprise to the researchers. After all, why would people who are slow in reading be fast at responding to visual representations of causal reasoning?"


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We have privileged the written language and marginalized visuals and imagery. There are many forms of creativity. I had students who read slowly and wrote poorly but were great artists and poets. Those things are not valued in School. I wonder who decided on that?

 

Learning disabilities may not be disabilities. They may be different ways of learning. I watched students share their abilities. The artist helped the writers who helped the artists.

 

I listened to a key note speaker who had little teaching experience and had rushed through teaching to get out of the classroom ridicule the use of haiku in teaching. Yet, I found students enjoyed writing poetry and drawing more than they enjoyed his passion, digital technologies. School managers and experts should spend time with students and learn what students enjoy.

 

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