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The Landing: More on Connectivism: a response to Stephen Downes

The Landing: More on Connectivism: a response to Stephen Downes | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A theory without practice is empty. Practice without theory is idling along. The two go together and connect within a particular situational praxis.

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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How to Better Remember and Make Use of What You Read

How to Better Remember and Make Use of What You Read | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A blog about productivity, workflow automation, company building and how to get things done with less work.

Via Fred Zimny, massimo facchinetti, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The author provides some excellent points about writing and using recent read material.

 

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Five Models of Teacher-Centered Professional Development | Global Partnership for Education

Five Models of Teacher-Centered Professional Development | Global Partnership for Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Earlier this year I wrote a series of posts critiquing the hegemony of the cascade (train-the-trainers) approach (here, here and here) and promoting teacher centered

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

At the heart of teacher learning is working with other teachers.

 

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8 Tips to Spice Up a Flipped Classroom - Teach Amazing!

8 Tips to Spice Up a Flipped Classroom - Teach Amazing! | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
8 Tips to Spice Up a Flipped Classroom - Check out Teach Amazing for educational technology, web 2.0, and great tips to teach amazing!

Via Mika Auramo, Suvi Salo
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Suvi Salo's curator insight, November 27, 12:18 PM

..."not all video watching needs to be done out of class"...

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Teaching Practices Inventory Provides Tool to Help You Examine Your Teaching

Teaching Practices Inventory Provides Tool to Help You Examine Your Teaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Maryellen Weimer, PhD:
Here’s a great resource: the Teaching Practices Inventory. It’s an inventory that lists and scores the extent to which research-based teaching practices are being used.

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I will have to spend time exploring this.

 

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leading and learning: Creative schools to develop the talents of all students.

leading and learning: Creative schools to develop the talents of all students. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers do not make young people. The provide space for students to take responsibility for their learning. That is a huge and risky responsibility.

 

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The Most Important Reasons To Avoid Educational Technology

The Most Important Reasons To Avoid Educational Technology | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

A discussion on the five most important challenges facing teachers who are using educational technology : privacy, equity and corporate influence.


Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are good and provocative points raised.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, November 26, 9:24 AM

I suspect Mr. Campbell is being deliberately provocative in his call for avoiding technology. In reading his post, I think he is really asking for a rational response to educational technology. In workshop after presentation after workshop I have said and heard said that technology is only one of many possible resources that can be used in a classroom and that technology, as with any resource, should be used with intention. In other words, stop scraping your knees scrambling on the bandwagon.


Infrastructure is paramount. Equity is important. Having a plan for data security and data management is, without question, one of the most important first steps. And just because everyone else seems to be doing "it"--whatever the technological "it" might be, whether BYOD or buying tablets or charging headlong into some nifty new technology squirrel fad, doesn't mean "it" is right for your classroom(s), your school(s), your district. Having a PLAN and a vision for how technology might be integrated in your classroom(s) is the most important "it" for technology. And having some sense of how that plan might evolve as technology races through its evolutionary process is even more important. Do whatever it is that makes sense for you and your students, but do it well.

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, November 26, 9:29 AM

???

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Two teachers' refusal to give tests puts their jobs at risk, but they say it's worth it

Teacher says her opposition to test isn't about her evaluation, "it's about watching kids cry, and throw chairs and pee their pants and scratch their face until it turns red or they bleed." TPS Superintendent Keith Ballard says he is willing to listen to teachers and has called for an audit of all testing.

Via Christopher Tienken
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The superintendent is wrong and lacks courage. He is not in the classroom and his position needs to shift.

 

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Email to My Students: "the luxury of being thankful"

Email to My Students: "the luxury of being thankful" | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In addition to the absence of coordination and sufficiency, the programs of the past all have another common failing — they are indirect. Each seeks to solve poverty by first solving something else...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is a well-written and well-thought out article and email. We live in difficult times and for young people that sometimes needs their teachers to step back helping to find the way. In a sense, it is a literal and figurative holding their hands.

 

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Understanding servant leadership

Understanding servant leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“The 21st century has brought much in the way of turmoil and change to the world of business. As a consequence, ways of doing business that were once universally accepted now seem outdated and inflexible in an age where knowledge drives economies and socially responsible corporate attitudes influence stakeholders and shareholders alike. ”


Via Anne Juvanteny
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I heard Dr. van Dierendonck present last summer at Gonzaga. It was interesting to listen how a quantitative scientist conceptualized servant-leadership.

 

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When everyone is a feminist, is anyone?

When everyone is a feminist, is anyone? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Jessica Valenti: It’s suddenly cool to be a feminist. But what does that mean for feminism as a movement?


Via bobbygw
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is an interesting question. It is more about accepting that we are always transforming as people this includes our ways of thinking and identity.

 

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It Takes a Community to Educate a Student - Huffington Post

It Takes a Community to Educate a Student - Huffington Post | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Experiences outside of the classroom are often as meaningful as those inside the classroom. The academic professionals on your campuses are integral to the success and well-being of your students....

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It does. Unfortunately, too many Schools are not communities. Communities are organic and come with dysfunctions that have to be talked through and listened through.

 

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Why Middle Managers Are So Unhappy

Why Middle Managers Are So Unhappy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Who are the unhappiest among your workers? And what’s driving them crazy? They may not be who you think they are. They aren’t who we would have thought.

To find out, we gathered data from the most unengaged and uncommitted employees from more than 320,000 employees in a variety of organizations. We then identified those employees whose engagement and commitment scores were in the bottom 5% and compared the responses of these 15,729 unhappy souls to the rest.

You might think these would be the people with poor performance ratings or the ones in over their heads – people with inadequate training, education, or experience for the job. Or perhaps they’re the ones who haven’t been on the job long enough to decide they’re a bad fit and move elsewhere.

But when we examined the demographic characteristics of these employees, we found instead that they could best be described as those “stuck in the middle of everything.”

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, November 25, 9:48 AM

Engagement bombshell! 'Unhappiest people at work are good, steady performers' ~ Zenger Folkman research.

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25 Alternatives To What'd You Learn In School Today?

25 Alternatives To What'd You Learn In School Today? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"You try to fake it, but it limps right out of your mouth, barely alive. “What’d you learn in school today?”

In a single sentence, all that is wrong with “school.” First, the detachment–you literally have no idea what they’re learning or why. (You leave that up to school, because that’s what school’s for, right?)..."


Via Beth Dichter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The prompts provide an alternative to a question which yields "I didn't learn anything."

 

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, November 27, 5:05 PM

Although these questions may be geared to parents they would be great students to have students answer at the end of a day, or the end of a lesson.

Below are five of the questions provided. When you click through to the post you will find 19 questions proposed by readers of Te@chThought. You might also share this list with parents.

* Tell me one chance you took today, and how it ended up.

* Tell me three facts, two opinions, and one idea you heard today.

* Tell me one fun thing you learned, one useful thing you learned, and one extraordinary thing you learned.

* When were you most creative today?

* What great question did you ask today?

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On Not Silencing Students: A Pedagogical How-to

On Not Silencing Students: A Pedagogical How-to | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Why do students submit writing to their teachers? Many writing-intensive courses at all levels of education center on student-created, teacher-graded writing assignments. Such a system streamlines ...

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A long but very interesting article which speaks to the making writing a broader communication process.

 

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Prompts to Help Students Reflect on How They Approach Learning

Prompts to Help Students Reflect on How They Approach Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

By: Maryellen Weimer, PhD in Teaching Professor Blog

 

"One of the best gifts teachers can give students are the experiences that open their eyes to themselves as learners. Most students don’t think much about how they learn. Mine used to struggle to write a paragraph describing the study approaches they planned to use in my communication courses. However, to be fair, I’m not sure I had a lot of insights about my learning when I was a student. Did you?
As fall courses start to wind down, it’s an apt time for reflection. Here are some pithy (I hope) prompts that might motivate students to consider their beliefs about learning."


Via Dennis T OConnor, Audrey
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers and students require time to reflect. We should be creating classrooms which reflect a phenomenological experiencing of teaching and learning.

 

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sian etherington's curator insight, November 24, 9:40 AM

Reflecting on your own learning as a teacher is very helpful for thinking about your own students' learning and your own approaches to teaching.

Claire Brooks's curator insight, November 24, 5:01 PM

good prompts for developing reflective practice about self as learner. Might work in with some aspects of Learning Analytics too.

Audrey's curator insight, November 27, 12:15 PM
Questions such as the two below are very helpful in getting students to think about their own learning and to take responsibility rather than waiting for the teacher to always direct them: Say, for example, you don’t think you’re any good at math, or that you can’t write or draw, what happens when you have to do these things? Does what you believe about yourself as a learner have any effect on how you perform?Have you ever learned something you didn’t think you could learn? What? How did you feel once you had learned it?

 

 I recently asked students to do work they had not been asked previously to do.  The result was:  all 13 students performed very well. They had to write and think in different ways. I asked them to write an essay in 25 minutes on a topic they had not previously studied.  

 

The other topic was: to make sentences using homonyns.   A  homonyn is a word that is spelt the same or sounds the same as another word but is different in meaning, e.g. ate and eight; berry and bury; red and read.  

 

Although the majority of the students were foreign and were learning English as a second language, they were able to complete the task exceptionally well.  They were allowed to work in twos but none of them consulted a dictionary.  All of them completed 10 sentences using homonyns such as:   bore/boar; birth/berth; bald/bawled; pray/prey; principle/principal; missed/mist, etc ....without asking me the meanings.

 

What this demonstrates is that in the right environment / atmosphere a person will  use their brain processes.  What educators should always be doing is encouraging the intake of knowledge in a variety of contexts, situations: students should visit museums,  banks to learn real mathematics; House of Parliament to question politicians, etc....

 

Learn psychology on http://www.hotmoodle.com

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How a Moveable Space Can Ignite Creativity in the Classroom

How a Moveable Space Can Ignite Creativity in the Classroom | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Break-out spaces and furniture on wheels can do wonders to enhance a person's learning experience. Here are six low-cost ideas for creating those environments in the classroom.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Taking teaching and learning off-campus is another way to approach this. As well, having parents come in and help is excellent. I had an emergency room physician and a registered nurse help with a Science unit about the human body.

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Essay criticizes state of assessment movement in higher education

Essay criticizes state of assessment movement in higher education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In higher education circles, there is something of a feeding frenzy surrounding the issue of assessment.

Via Blaine Morrow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are excellent points made. With predetermined outcomes, we turn learning, teaching, and assessment into mechanical, technical activities.

 

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Becoming a Listening Educator

Becoming a Listening Educator | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The four traits of a listening educator are a willingness to slow down, genuine curiosity, attention to non-verbal cues, and self-awareness and empathy.


Via Patti Kinney, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Slowing down and being curious are vital to teaching.

 

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Teaching needs less ideology, and more evidence | Estelle Morris

Teaching needs less ideology, and more evidence | Estelle Morris | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Instead of political meddling, why don’t we look to rigorous research to decide what works in our classrooms? asks Estelle Morris

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Quite often our ideologies shape the evidence we seek and we justify our positions that way. I agree that when we enter into ideologies we lock into binary positions which are not helpful to solving the challenges we face if that is at all possible.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, November 26, 9:57 AM

American politicians: please take note.


"I would focus the debate around where to place the boundary between education and politics on the issue of who decides how teachers should teach – after all, that is what makes the difference. . . Pedagogy is becoming a case of opinion and prejudice rather than a decision based on evidence and professional judgment."  Hear, hear!

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Why I’m Thankful for Today’s Educators

Why I’m Thankful for Today’s Educators | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Judy Seltz
Educators deal in hope. Unlike artists who create paintings or sculptures, manufacturers who run assembly lines, or programmers who write code, teachers and principals rarely see the finished “product” of their work.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teachers are not creating products. It is difficult to find the right word but what we create is the hope that students can contribute in their particular way to society.

 

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Leverage Diversity for Greater Success - Otrazhenie

Leverage Diversity for Greater Success - Otrazhenie | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
From http://thefutureleadershipinitiative.wordpress.com As Adam Vaccaro points out, diverse workplace...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an interesting article with a link to some recent research about diversity in the workplace. There is a suggestion that diversity includes access to information and different thinking.

 

 

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Feminism as Evangelism

Feminism as Evangelism | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

How Gender Justice Brought Me Back to the Church “I have always found it difficult to walk away from the church, but I have also found it difficult to walk with it.” [1] Those evocative words, the first sentence of feminist…...


Via bobbygw
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Justice should be central to all thinking. We do not live in a binary world but one with considerable ambiguity.

 

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Six factors that explain why educational action research is being snuffed out.

Six factors that explain why educational action research is being snuffed out. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I'm noticing a trend, and I wonder if anyone else is noticing it. When I was working on my Master's back in the oughts, the big push was for meaningful action research in schools and classrooms. If...

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is much easier to jump on bandwagons than to do local action research. Or, at least it appears that way on the surface. Each School, for that matter each class, has its own needs and challenges. The bandwagons are broad templates which can add much when applied with local research in place.

 

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Cultivating Creativity in the Classroom

Standardized tests got you down? Need a dose of inspiration? With strategies from creativity experts, this presentation is for teachers looking for ideas to cu…

Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Creating a healthy environment where students and teachers contribute to forming good habits is an important first step.

 

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10 Ways to Sabotage Your Classroom Management

10 Ways to Sabotage Your Classroom Management | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Middle school veteran Jennifer Gonzalez identifies 10 ineffective habits new teachers often develop and proposes some better classroom management techniques.

Via Patti Kinney, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These make sense. For example, waiting for the class to be quiet and providing visual cues are excellent ideas.

 

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Suzanne Trask's curator insight, November 26, 4:03 PM

Sounds interesting