Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Tony L. Talbert: It's Time to Take Back Our Public Education System

Tony L. Talbert: It's Time to Take Back Our Public Education System | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Tony L. Talbert, a professor of social/cultural studies education and qualitative research in the Baylor University School of Education, writes in the Waco News that we as a nation have failed to r...
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

What is passed off as reform is actually deforming education whether it be the press for more digital technologies, changing curricula, full-day kindergarten, holding teachers more accountable, etc. It is a technocratic approach which can only happen in a vacuum where people outside classrooms make all the decisions.

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 2014 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine, PhD I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
Alan Jordan's curator insight, April 3, 2016 4:13 PM

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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A Look at the Big Picture of the Future of Work

A Look at the Big Picture of the Future of Work | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Maybe in your particular vision of the future of work, you imagine factories full of robots, automating commonplace tasks, while human beings orchestrate the work’s ultimate goals and intent. Perhaps you think of the working population’s shifting demographics, with the

Via James Schreier
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
What will this mean for schools and teaching?
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James Schreier's curator insight, August 15, 10:47 AM

A very interesting and very relevant article.  It includes a classification of "implications" into three categories.  This could be a great foundation for a more thorough exploration because there are important positive and negative implications beyond what appear to be "first--orders"  or even just categories.  Parts of this future will clearly be "paradigm shifts;" many are already occurring.

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On six women intellectuals: Simone Weil, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Diane Arbus and Joan Didion

On six women intellectuals: Simone Weil, Hannah Arendt, Mary McCarthy, Susan Sontag, Diane Arbus and Joan Didion | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Sontag advocated “feeling management” and emotional regulation, insisting on the responsibility of the intellectual to keep personal feeling out.

Via bobbygw
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This looks interesting.
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The Trouble with Incentives - New Rambler Review

The New Rambler Review publishes reviews of books about ideas, including literary fiction. It is edited by Eric Posner, Adrian Vermeule and Blakey Vermeule
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"The Moral Economy appeals to an ancient truth. Incentives and self-interest are no substitute for moral motivation and altruism"

Bowles makes an argument based on Aristotle's view of the good legislator and citizen. Subjected to laws from above that conflict with local norms people resist the former and accept the latter. This can be seen in classrooms as community comes together with good teachers leading the way. The converse is the person who spent little time, if any, teaching and professes to understand what it meant technically by teaching.
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The Thief of Workplace Productivity - Kevin Sheridan

The Thief of Workplace Productivity - Kevin Sheridan | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Find out what's damaging workplace productivity, as well as some effective and proven solutions.

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The answer is interruptions. I found this is the case in teaching. Principals feel they are entitled to walk in and interrupt teaching.
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One Thing People Want From Their Leaders

One Thing People Want From Their Leaders | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
There are many things leaders want from their followers. You will get most more of them, most of the time, when you first respect those you want to follow you.

Via Kevin Watson, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Respect is the one thing. I think about this through the teaching lens. I wanted to follow the leaders who respected my teaching, asked questions to understand how I taught, and engaged in thoughtful conversations with me. Those leaders were few and far between. For the last decade, they did not exist. I felt I was working for someone, not with someone. Having said this, I discovered, along the way, the respect I desired was what my students desired, as well.
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Slow Down And Get Your Best Ideas – The Writing Cooperative

Slow Down And Get Your Best Ideas – The Writing Cooperative | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Sometimes, you can be so busy reacting to everything that is happening around you that you lose touch with the core of who you are, this soul of your Being. And it is when you stop listening to…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Being present to your writing, teaching, drinking tea, etc. is essential to the art of completing that task well.
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Literature reviews made easy

Literature reviews made easy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Turn that jumble of notes and ideas into a well-organized draft by getting organized, staying focused, setting a schedule, seeking feedback, and finding your voice.

Via Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A straightforward article that can be helpful. Organize, follow a schedule, be focused on the task, seek feedback, and find your writer's voice are excellent ideas.
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#HR Marshall Goldsmith’s Five Essential Books on Leadership | Box of Crayons

#HR Marshall Goldsmith’s Five Essential Books on Leadership | Box of Crayons | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Marshall Goldsmith is consistently named to Forbes' The World’s Most Influential Business Thinkers list and has been recognized as the top-rated executive coach at the Thinkers50 ceremony in London since 2011. Marshall is also an award-winning author, and his recent book, Triggers: Creating Behavior That Lasts—Becoming the Person You Want to Be, is a Wall Street Journal and New York Times #1 bestseller. I'm thrilled that he is my guest blogger today, sharing his five essential books on leadership. Book 1: Old Path White Clouds: Walking in the Footsteps of the Buddha By Thich Nhat Hanh This book makes me feel peaceful and content as I read it. It is very simple and very profound at the same time. Book 2: Hesselbein on Leadership By Frances Hesselbein Peter Drucker said that Frances Hesselbein is the greatest leader he ever met. Read this book and you will agree with him! Book 3: The Leadership Challenge: How to Make Extraordinary Things Happen in Organizations By Barry Posner and

Via Kevin Watson, Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The books are interesting, including one by Thich Nhat Hanh: Old Path White Clouds: Walking in the Footsteps of Buddha.
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This Is The Key To Finding A Mentor At Every Stage Of Your Career

This Is The Key To Finding A Mentor At Every Stage Of Your Career | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Your career needs change with your job title.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Finding someone close to your level who can help you learn your job is essential. Having said this, relationships are essential to mentor-protege scenarios and that is a bigger factor.

A new principal in a school may turn to someone who has been in the school for a number of years, but has not been an administrator. This can leave a gap that might need to be filled. So it is less about one relationship and more about several that meet the needs of the context.
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4 Steps To Becoming More Inquisitive As Leaders

4 Steps To Becoming More Inquisitive As Leaders | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Learn about 4 steps any leader can take to help them become inquisitive in order to bring out the best from those they lead.

Via donhornsby, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Asking questions means listening to listen, not answer. Teaching and leading are synomous.
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donhornsby's curator insight, June 21, 8:11 AM
How do we become more inquisitive in our leadership?
 
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20 Brain Expanding Books That Altered the Course of my Life Forever

20 Brain Expanding Books That Altered the Course of my Life Forever | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Saying you learned something that gave you a crucial insight, altered the way you think about the world, or made you better at your business or profession means everything. I read because there’s a…

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Haidt, Gilbert, Drucker, etc. appeal to me; Peter Thiel less so.
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15 Leadership Books Every Future Leader Should Read (or anyone actually)

15 Leadership Books Every Future Leader Should Read (or anyone actually) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many times I've had people ask me, "In addition to coaching and training, what else can I do to learn more about how to improve myself? How can I learn to be a great leader that propels myself and others towards greater growth and greater opportunities?"

 My answer is simple, read. Read everything you can about successful leaders and the steps that they have taken to achieve peak performance for themselves and their organisations.

 The following is a list, and brief overview, of some of the best books that I have read about leadership.

Via David Hain, Create Wise Leader
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A list that includes Viktor Frankl and Man's Search for Meaning is good.
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Jerry Busone's curator insight, June 23, 7:46 AM

being honest not all these are what I'd call 21st century reads... lesson is simple read something about our craft and make yourself better . Read my book #offthebenchleadership or another ... but read 

Ian Berry's curator insight, June 24, 7:37 PM
What I do is compare recommended reading lists When the same books appear I get them As is this case with this list a few make my lists too http://www.ianberry.biz/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/IanBerrysrecommendedreadinglist.pdf
Kudos's curator insight, July 13, 10:36 AM
Good list of books worth the read. Take a look. This is a what we are reading - http://kudosnow.com/en/blog/story/what-we-are-reading-on-employee-engagement-volume-1 Enjoy. 
 
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The Art of Revision: Most of What You Write Should Be Cut

The Art of Revision: Most of What You Write Should Be Cut | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"When I compose a first draft I just let everything I feel and think spill out raw and chaotically on the page. I let it be a mess. I trust my instincts. I just let my ideas and feelings flow until I run out of words. It’s fine for an early draft to be a disaster area. I don’t censor myself. When I have this raw copy, I can then decide if this idea is worth pung more effort into. If so, then with the second draft, I clean up spelling and grammar. I add anything I forgot to include in the first draft and take out whatever isn’t working. Then the real fun begins with the third draft. (Despite its importance, art should always be a form of play.) That’s where I work on what I know are my creative weaknesses."


Via Sharon Bakar, Penelope, Lynnette Van Dyke, Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
An interesting article that underscores the complexity and messiness of good writing.
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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, August 9, 8:25 PM
Share your insight
Penelope's curator insight, August 10, 9:38 PM
I love this piece. It absolutely sings and goes straight to the heart of a writer. If you are a creative, you should feel inspired and thankful for the opportunity to create beautiful art with your words.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"*** 

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Why doing a PhD is often a waste of time – The Economist

Why doing a PhD is often a waste of time – The Economist | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
On the evening before All Saints’ Day in 1517, Martin Luther nailed 95 theses to the door of a church in Wittenberg. In those days a thesis was simply a position one wanted to argue. Luther, an…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I have a PhD in Philosohy of Leadership Studies. I don't have a job and I do not have prospects, but I think "if I have a PhD, I should be able to create a niche. If academia cannot figure out I am a worthwhile candidate to teach in higher ed, how do I overcome that?"

I read and write every day. I work to refine what got me this far.
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Can we hope to understand how the Greeks saw their world? – Maria Michela Sassi | Aeon Essays

Can we hope to understand how the Greeks saw their world? – Maria Michela Sassi | Aeon Essays | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Greek colour experience was made of movement and shimmer. Can we ever glimpse what they saw when gazing out to sea?
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
An interesting article that is much easier to read than explain. Without trying to put ourselves in the minds of Ancient Greeks, understanding their paradigms and theories is essential to understanding how they understood the world. The same can be said about any epoch and its thinkers.
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Stop Using the Excuse “Organizational Change Is Hard”

Stop Using the Excuse “Organizational Change Is Hard” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Change is hard in the same way that it’s hard to finish a marathon.

Via Ian Berry
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Organizational change is hard, but change is always happening. The difference is organizational change should be purposeful and meaningful to the people in the organization. One of the reasons school remain little changed over time is that there is little effort on the part of those imposing change from outside on those inside schools and classrooms to engage teachers in the process. Instead of reform, we end up with school deform.
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Ian Berry's curator insight, July 22, 6:55 PM
Like the metaphor "Change is hard in the same way that it’s hard to finish a marathon." Yes change is hard work. It's less hard in my experience when we stop trying to change people and instead focus on changing processes
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Please! No more Icebreakers: 5 Ways to Get a Group Connected Without Icebreakers

Please! No more Icebreakers: 5 Ways to Get a Group Connected Without Icebreakers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"I want to affirm that getting people connected at the beginning of a meeting is essential for creating an openness and willingness to challenge. Peter Block has influenced my thinking on this issue. He always says, “Connection before Content.” If a group is going to concentrate on a difficult issue, they need to learn who others are, the skills they bring, the experience they represent, and the values they hold. Stasser, who studies group performance, notes, “Group performance increases when everyone in a group is aware of each other member’s expertise.” But unfortunately, icebreakers, like those I’ve listed above, don’t accomplish that that goal.

"Happily there are alternatives to icebreakers that effectively build connections between members of a group. I will suggest five that I use, but first I want to share my rules of thumb for designing an activity that creates connection, because the rules of thumb are much more important than the specific activity you choose."

 

Jim Lerman's insight: Very informative article


Via Jim Lerman, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I am not a big fan of icebreakers. The article suggests to "connect" in a group, form community, activities have to be well-thought out. What is the gathering about? What does the group want to accomplish?
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Paulette Dotson's curator insight, July 18, 2:29 PM
You must remember as a younger person those awful icebreakers at camp, school etc.  There are other options to help build connections in groups.
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Problems are Interconnected -- And so are Solutions - The Donella Meadows Project

Problems are Interconnected -- And so are Solutions - The Donella Meadows Project | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The way it is usually told, the message Everything is Connected to Everything Else is not fun to hear. It is intended to cause repentance and reformation. More often, of course, it causes guilt, fear, and an uncontrollable urge to avoid environmentalists.

What we are rarely told is that solutions are as interconnected as problems. One good environmental action can send out waves of good effects as impressive as the chain of disasters that results from environmental evil.

Take energy efficiency, for example. That doesn’t mean deprivation of creature comforts; it means insulating houses, driving cars with better mileage, and plugging in appliances that deliver the same service for less electricity. Amory Lovins of the Rocky Mountain Institute says we could reduce electricity use in the U.S. by 70% with already-proven and currently-economic efficiency measures. We could cut our $430 billion annual energy bill in half just by being as efficient as Japan and West Germany are.

Via David Hain, Anne-Laure Delpech
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Hannah Arendt contended that action is what transcends the space and time we exist in. Teaching is that way. What happens in this moment can transcend space and time, finding new solutions and creating new problems unexpectedly. If we teach children to be environmentally aware, it is a gift that will find its way into the future.
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David Hain's curator insight, June 27, 7:22 AM

Forget about the butterfly's wings, there is a positive side to inter-connectedness - if we reframe our view of it!

Ian Berry's curator insight, June 30, 7:34 PM
Good reminder of the power of both/and. When it comes to solutions to problems acceptance of both/and is often the key to finding the third alternative
Sunny Ye's curator insight, July 15, 2:32 AM
The butterfly effect
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How a Daily Walk Can Boost Your Creativity – The Writing Cooperative

How a Daily Walk Can Boost Your Creativity – The Writing Cooperative | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If you’re like most writers, you probably spend a big part of your day seated at your desk in front of a computer. There are stories and blog posts to write, comments to reply to, emails to send…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I walk every day. For me, it is a meditative space. It is interesting how often, when I get back from a walk, I have an idea or edit for my writing. Meditation helped me while I was teaching.
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Culture Of Courage: Creating A Culture That Breeds Bravery

Culture Of Courage: Creating A Culture That Breeds Bravery | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

People are innately wired to avoid risk. During times of times of change and uncertainty, our risk aversion is amplified.


Via Mike Klintworth, William Rowell, Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Create a space for healthy and robust conversations. Let people speak up, with respect, and voice their ideas. I stress the overlapping features of teaching and leading. I can easily apply the article and poster to a classroom.
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Mike Klintworth's curator insight, September 2, 2014 8:07 AM
Imagine the innovation and creativity that could be unleashed in your team or organization if everyone in it had the courage to speak candidly, try new approaches, and lay their reputation on the line for the bigger mission of your organization.
William Rowell's curator insight, September 3, 2014 5:51 AM

How do leaders foster the type of bold thinking and brave behavior needed to build competitive advantage and grow collective prosperity? They do so by cultivating a “Culture of Courage”

Ian Berry's curator insight, July 10, 3:58 PM
I like all 5 of these suggestions
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Poem of the Week: ‘Darling’ by Naomi Shihab Nye

Poem of the Week: ‘Darling’ by Naomi Shihab Nye | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Drawing on her heritage and memories of the Middle East, the Palestinian-American poet speaks to language's power to bridge divisions between places and cultures.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I enjoy poetry and Naomi Shihab Nye is one of my favourites. She speaks to the fragility and power of language in this one, which is of great interest to me right now, as I read Paul Ricoeur.
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How to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year, According to Harvard Research

How to Read (a Lot) More Books This Year, According to Harvard Research | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Reading is a huge key to success and wealth, but how can you actually benefit from this habit as a busy adult? I’ve said it many times: reading books is a major key to success.


Via Penelope
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are many hidden moments to read.
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Penelope's curator insight, June 30, 1:28 PM
Read before you decide to write. Sage advice, but when? One tip from this author is...there are hidden minutes everywhere. Find yours.

***This review was written by Penelope Silvers for her curated content on "Writing Rightly"***
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, August 2, 2:02 PM
Reading and conversation are essential to learning.
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6 Websites with Great Writing Prompts – Personal Growth – Medium

6 Websites with Great Writing Prompts – Personal Growth – Medium | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I’d been extolling the benefits of stream-of-consciousness writing with a new friend halfway across the world. I think I sounded like some kind of wizard. “Start writing, and the ideas will flow!” I…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I had several similar, but not as detailed prompt sources when I taught. These are better in that they are more detailed and can easily be modified based on student ages and needs.
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Let's Stop With The Worksheets And Create Engaged Readers -

Let's Stop With The Worksheets And Create Engaged Readers - | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Rarity of Engaged Reading by Angela Peery, TeachThought PD Facilitator Grow with >> TeachThought PD Literacy Workshops Picture a classroom full of youngsters. They could be darling, chubby-cheeked kindergartners or swaggering, confident high school seniors – or anything in between.
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Two stories came to mind for me as I read the article. A student who struggled with reading had begun reading Underground to Canada. The following year I noticed he had started reading the book from the beginning. I asked "why?" He said he enjoyed the book so much, had not finished it the year before, and did not want to miss anything in it.

A student and I decided to read Night by Elie Wiesel as a novel study. I told her not to read ahead as I wanted to discuss chapters as she read them. The following week she came to school and told me she had read the whole book in one sitting. She asked, "are we supposed to cry when we read a book?" I said, "yes, depending on the book." We figured out another way to discuss the book.
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Lindsay Hoyt's curator insight, June 26, 11:47 PM

Reading is key to every content at every level.

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Project Based Learning is a Roller Coaster by Catlin Tucker

Project Based Learning is a Roller Coaster by Catlin Tucker | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
One of the most challenging aspects of this school year has been using project-based learning to integrate curriculum. Projects are a beast! It feels like I am boarding a roller coaster each time we begin a new project. In fact,

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Project-based learning was invigorating for students and me. It allowed me to teach in a cross-curricular manner, integrating subjects. For example, The Cay provided bridged Social Studies, Science and Language Arts.

I spent time with multiple curricula, the projects, and rubrics each year. At the heart of a project are problems waiting to be addressed
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Bobbi Dunham's curator insight, June 23, 12:55 PM
Less is more.
Arizona State University, Claire McLaughlin's curator insight, June 23, 6:16 PM
Have you tried project based learning with your English language learners? If so, was it a roller coaster?  PBL is challenging, and one has to be ready for that challenge.  
Oskar Almazan's curator insight, June 25, 4:26 PM
One of the most challenging aspects of this school year has been using project-based learning to integrate curriculum. Projects are a beast! It feels like I am boarding a roller coaster each time we begin a new project. In fact, it feels like every project follows the same emotionally turbulent trajectory as pictured below.