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The "Principals" of Building Trust

The "Principals" of Building Trust | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Trusting relationships are a key factor of successful schools. Building a positive professional level of trust forms the foundation that allows staff, students, and communities to take risks, succeed,…

Via Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I liked the numbering process the author used. If each "principle/principal" took time and sought honest feedback in each area, it might make a difference in schools.

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, April 29, 6:08 PM

Some sage advice for all administrators. The end of the year is a good time to review and plan. 

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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Why I’m a Principal, Not a Statistic

Why I’m a Principal, Not a Statistic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

As October, National Principals Month, comes to an end, I cannot help but to reflect upon what led me into the principalship.  As a twenty-one year old African American male, I could have very easily become a statistic. Five months after graduating from IUP in rural Pennsylvania, I was shot and left for dead on a football field in Philadelphia.


Via Patti Kinney, Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Principals do have an influence on teachers. What is sad is they exert that influence poorly as evidenced by the numbers that leave the profession. The challenge is creating empathic relationships between teachers and principals.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, October 30, 10:53 AM

Squeezing in an inspirational article at the very end of Principals Month. Every now and then it is important to remember what brought us to leadership.

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Four Ways to Move from ‘School World’ to ‘Real World’

Four Ways to Move from ‘School World’ to ‘Real World’ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Knowledge has become increasingly abundant, giving educators the opportunity to make the school world look more like the real world.

Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Do we really move from School world to the Real world? Or are they both part of each other? Dewey wrote about this a Century ago.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 30, 11:16 AM

Knowledge has become increasingly abundant, giving educators the opportunity to make the school world look more like the real world.


kelvinsmim's curator insight, October 30, 11:25 AM
The dynamo and alternator are two very similar devices that have the same function; to produce electric power via a mechanical input. Both dynamos and alternators use the same concept of electromagnetic fields to produce power. The main difference between dynamos and alternator is the type of current they produce. Dynamos produce a direct current that flows in the same direction.For more information visit our website.
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What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child?

What’s Going on Inside the Brain Of A Curious Child? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
New research suggests that curiosity triggers chemical changes in the brain that help students better understand and retain information.

Via ICTPHMS
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Curiosity is something we need to nurture and cultivate as a life-long process.

 

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How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens by Benedict Carey « Dr. Doug Green

How We Learn: The Surprising Truth About When, Where, and Why It Happens by Benedict Carey « Dr. Doug Green | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via CECI Jean-François, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

From a phenomenological perspective, recalling something as a memory is an event separate from the event being remembered. This changes the original memory.

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CECI Jean-François's curator insight, October 28, 9:01 AM
des modes de fonctionnement de notre cerveau importants a connaitre pour mieux se connaître et mieux apprendre à apprendre !
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Why Superstars Struggle to Bond with Their Teams

Why Superstars Struggle to Bond with Their Teams | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
And what to do about it.

Via Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found in School we did not want those who were high-achievers. We wanted those who followed the party line and worked according to the boss' dictates.

 

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, October 27, 12:35 PM

An interesting study that you should apply to yourself as you move into leadership positions and to those you lead. If you find yourself always pointing to the same  few staff members as exemplars, you should take into consideration how that attention affects their relationships with their peers. 

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How to Avoid Promoting to a New Level of Incompetence

How to Avoid Promoting to a New Level of Incompetence | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When I was taking business school courses a billion years ago, we used to laugh at the Peter Principle*, “managers are promoted to their level of incompetence,” to explain stupidity in organizations. Sadly, current evidence seems to point to th [...]

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

One of the reasons that incompetence tends to survive and flourish is that bosses want someone to follow their directions without questioning. Open and civil conversations would be helpful.

 

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Inquiry and Collaboration

Inquiry and Collaboration | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"As teacher-inquirers begin formulating their initial wonderings, they often ponder in a similar fashion."  The Reflective Educator's Guide to Classroom Research   Teacher inquiry always invol...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is no question that teachers working together in various ways helps their learning and that of students. Do teachers have time to work together in effective ways?

 

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The ABCs Of Sticky Teaching - Learning That Lingers

The ABCs Of Sticky Teaching - Learning That Lingers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The ABCs Of Sticky Teaching

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

That is an interesting way of labeling good teaching which leads to good learning: sticky learning. It lingers as we linger and while over the worth.

 

@ivon_ehd1 .

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Youth Sports Psychology: Ensuring Your Athletes Stay Confident, Motivated, and Having Fun

Youth Sports Psychology: Ensuring Your Athletes Stay Confident, Motivated, and Having Fun | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“By: Giovanni Grassi Read More at: As coaches, we are encouraged to motivate our young athletes to get better every day—and to have fun. But do coaches really know how to let young athletes have fu...”


Via Luis Valdes, monique sp
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning at all ages and in all spheres occurs we have fun. It begins when we are young.

 

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Guillaume Dumoulin's curator insight, October 26, 7:39 AM

(en anglais) Rappel sur les théories de l'éducation et sur les conduites à avoir dans l'encadrement sportif d'enfants (privilégier la confiance, la motivation et surtout le plaisir!)

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Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures

Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In Japanese classrooms, teachers consciously design tasks that are slightly beyond the capabilities of the students they teach, so the students can actually experience struggling with something just outside their reach.

Via Mel Riddile, Srimayee Dam
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We do want students to struggle a bit with their learning. It is part of building resiliency.

 

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What Happens When Students Control Their Own Education? - The Atlantic

What Happens When Students Control Their Own Education? - The Atlantic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When a New Hampshire district found itself struggling with low test scores and high turnover, it made a radical decision: Flip the traditional model and let kids take over the classrooms.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The teacher and teaching assume different responsibilities in classrooms where students take responsibility for their learning.

 

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Education Readings October 24th

Education Readings October 24th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allan.alach@ihug.co.nz. This week’s homework!   The Myth of “Knowledge Gaps” “I asked this question:...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Another post with links to excellent readings with diverse topics i.e. the threat of standardization, meta-cognition, the revival of constructionism, etc.

 

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The Quote Garden - Quotes, Sayings, Quotations, Verses

Large, searchable compilation of quotations arranged by topic. Inspirational, thought-provoking, humorous, literary, and special occasion quotes.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Quotes can very helpful in living our lives. Thank you Suvi.

 

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Parents as Leadership Developers

Parents as Leadership Developers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

It is never too early to help your kids understand that leadership involves service, communication, teamwork, and helping others to grow.


Via donhornsby
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Parents are pedagogues. They are the first pedagogues children encounter. Pedagogy is about leading from childhood and allowing children to grow into their leadership.

 

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donhornsby's curator insight, October 30, 11:02 AM

How have you inspired leadership in children?

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Right Listening by Mark Brady, Ph.D.

Right Listening by Mark Brady, Ph.D. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Provider: Mark Brady, Ph.D. Product: A downloadable version of the book Right Listening Description: A short book that evolved from teaching listening skills to aspiring clinical psychologists for ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Listening mindfully and attentively lies at the heart of teaching.

 

@ivon_ehd1

 

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Ethics and accountability in the nonprofit sector | National Council of Nonprofits

"Honesty, integrity, transparency, confidentiality, and equity are each examples of values that are typically expressed in a charitable nonprofit's code of ethics.

 

The purpose of adopting such a statement formally is to provide employees, volunteers, and board members with guidelines for making ethical choices and to ensure that there is accountability for those choices.

 

When board members of a charitable nonprofit adopt a code of ethics, they are expressing their commitment to ethical behavior. Such a commitment goes a long way to earning the public’s trust.

 

Why is ethical leadership so significant in the nonprofit sector?

Nonprofit organizations are “public benefit” corporations; the purpose of their existence is to benefit the public as opposed to the private interests of their board members, staff or even of individual clients. The mission of a charitable nonprofit expresses the particular way that the organization will fulfill its public benefit purpose. Fittingly, board members are often referred to as “trustees,” which reinforces the concept that the assets of a nonprofit are entrusted to the oversight of its board members who have a legal duty to ensure that the nonprofit uses those assets to fulfill its public benefit mission.

It is one thing to exist for the benefit of the public; it is another to earn the public’s trust through ethical leadership and responsible practices. The good will earned by accountable and transparent nonprofits is one of, if not the most important, of its assets. Donors will give to organizations they trust will use their contributions wisely. Volunteers will invest their time in causes when they trust that the nonprofit is acting ethically. And clients and consumers will return to a nonprofit for services, and recommend that nonprofit to others, when the nonprofit has shown it is accountable for its actions, transparent in its financial dealings, and responsive when concerns come to the nonprofit's attention."

See more at: http://www.councilofnonprofits.org/resources/resources-topic/ethics-accountability#sthash.N8vqdRHH.dpuf


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Ethics is a way of living which cannot always be planned. New York University ethicist Kwame Appiah has referred to this way of living as making water from wine.

 

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, October 29, 2:08 PM

Ethics, trust and accountability are the non-negotiable items that non-profits must uphold and maintain. Reputation is vital in the non-profit sector. Serious problems exist within an organization where trust is broken due to conduct violations and where there is no accountability.

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You’re powered by quantum mechanics. No, really…

You’re powered by quantum mechanics. No, really… | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Biologists have long been wary of applying quantum theory to their own field. But, as Jim Al-Khalili and Johnjoe McFadden reveal, it might explain much natural phenomena

Via Anne Caspari
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Quantum mechanics and physics are useful in explaining complex behaviors. Several thinkers and writers have used the fields to help explain these complex ways of thinking i.e. Karen Barad, Donna Haraway, etc.

 

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20 Quotes From Children’s Books Every Adult Should Know

20 Quotes From Children’s Books Every Adult Should Know | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It’s interesting how some of life’s greatest lessons can be found in children’s literature. And chances are that we did not realize this back when we were kids. Sometimes it’s only when we’re older that we learn to fully appreciate and understand the poignant words from our childhood entertainment.




Here’s some of the best quotes from books we used to read.









1. A.A. Milne, Winnie the Pooh




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2. Dr Seiss, Horton Hears a Who




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3. Aesop, The Lion and the Mouse




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4. A.A. Milne, Winnie the Pooh




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5. Roald Dahl, The Twits




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6. Dr. Seuss, Oh the Places You’ll Go




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7. Shel Silverstein, A Light in the Attic




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8. Antoine de Saint-Exupery, The Little Prince




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9. L. Frank Braum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz




10. A.A. Milne, Winnie the Pooh




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11. E.B. White, Charlotte’s Web




12. J.K. Rowling, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire




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13. J.M. Barrie, Peter Pan




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14. Shel Silverstein




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15. Roald Dahl, The Minpins




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16. Dr. Seuss, The Lorax




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17. P.L. Travers, Mary Poppins




18. Frank Baum, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz




19. Lewis Carroll, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland




20. A.A. Milne, Winnie the Pooh




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Share the wisdom with your friends, everyone loves a good quote.

Via Linda Alexander
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I had some of these posted in the classroom and others I shared with students.

 

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Bankrupt Cultural Capital Claims: Beware the Roadbuilders, pt. 3

Bankrupt Cultural Capital Claims: Beware the Roadbuilders, pt. 3 | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Mathematics may well be simple, but the complexities of race and culture are often irreducible. They cannot be wholly addressed in a single essay or book or television show or movie. Roxane Gay, Ba...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

One challenge in School research and reform is the neo-liberal agenda that seems to come with it.

 

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8 Ways to Make Your Presentation More Interactive

8 Ways to Make Your Presentation More Interactive | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In a recent survey we conducted with the help of Harris Poll, almost half
of the respondents admitted to doing something other than listening during
a co-worker’s presentation—popular answers included sending a text message
(28 percent), checking email (27 percent), and falling asleep (17 percent).
To say the least, it can be difficult to hold an audience’s attention, let
alone get your message across when presenting. By making your presentation
more interactive, you can help your audience

Via MeeMetICT
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Presenting and teaching are similar so some of this might work for teaching as well.

 

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Talking To Students: What Do You Think?

Talking To Students: What Do You Think? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Talking To Students: What Do You Think?

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Open-ended (eloquent) questions should open up conversational spaces for students and teachers to enter.

 

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How to Become a Connective Leader Who Fosters Conviviality and Collaboration

How to Become a Connective Leader Who Fosters Conviviality  and Collaboration | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
To boost bonding among others so they are more apt to work (or play) well together, ask them, when together, to do two powerfully simple things that can be done rather quickly....

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leading is always about civility and conviviality. Without those qualities we cannot be leaders.

 

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Stop 20th Century Thinking

Stop 20th Century Thinking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In the 21st Century our approach to education can and should be very different from previous centuries. The basic skills we teach are pretty much the same, but the tools we have to use require...Learn more:- http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Rise+of+the+Professional+Educator


Via Gust MEES, Mika Auramo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We are almost 15% of the way through the 21st Century and this is still being discussed.

 

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kimi abreu's curator insight, October 25, 3:46 PM

technology moves teachers into 21st century?

Maibritt S. Andersen's curator insight, October 27, 7:33 AM

My suggestion: Use the knowledge of artists, musicians, busiess design - co-creation - in order to create new methods. Involve children and students as much as you can, and do it in a playful way. Now you're creating!

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Mark Twain on Slavery, How Religion Is Used to Justify Injustice, and What His Mother Taught Him About Compassion

Mark Twain on Slavery, How Religion Is Used to Justify Injustice, and What His Mother Taught Him About Compassion | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Twain with his longtime friend John T. Lewis, of whom the author remarked: 'I have not known an honester man nor a more respect-worthy one.' Lewis is said to have inspired the character of Jim in 'Huckleberry Finn.'"

 

"Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, is celebrated as America’s greatest humorist — from his irreverent advice to little girls to his snarky stance on creativity to his masterwork on masturbation. But underpinning his winsome wit was piercing insight into the human spirit and all its perplexities. From The Autobiography of Mark Twain: Volume 1 (public library) — which also gave us Twain on how morality and intelligence hinder each other — comes a moving anecdote about how his mother taught him the essence of empathy.

 

“'Poor thing, when he sings, it shows that he is not remembering, and that comforts me; but when he is still, I am afraid he is thinking, and I cannot bear it. He will never see his mother again; if he can sing, I must not hinder it, but be thankful for it. If you were older, you would understand me; then that friendless child’s noise would make you glad.'

 

"She never used large words, but she had a natural gift for making small ones do effective work."



Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mark Twain continues to have much to teach us.

 

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Leadership is More Than Skin Deep -

Leadership is More Than Skin Deep - | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Some people understand leadership to be like an article of clothing. They believe they can put leadership on or take it off as they need it. Some of us see a quality or skill in a window and decide to add it to our leadership ensemble. They may add a scarf or shoes to their leadership wardrobe …

Via Anne Leong, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am reading Arne Naess' work on deep ecology. Most of what we do is superficial. It takes hard work to go deep.

 

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Becky Willmoth's curator insight, October 22, 7:27 AM

Individuals who truly know themselves develop a frame for their values, strengths, passion and vision. This knowledge enables them to lead with authenticity and integrity, creating a connection with and commitment from those around them. Leaders that lack this self awareness are more like to behave inconsistently, eroding trust and undermining their leadership effectiveness.