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Handling Complexity in Decision-Making: Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings

Handling Complexity in Decision-Making:  Avoiding The Bike Rack Effect in Meetings | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Why would a $100M power plant zoning approval take 3 minutes and a request to build a $10,000 bike rack for city sidewalks take hours?

 

It's easy to be swept up in the trivial and fun stuff, starving the big issues for the time and consideration they merit.  Cyril Northcote Parkinson, a British historian and operations researcher, penned this extreme example of decision-making in meetings in his book Parkinson's Law. Paraphrasing the Wikipedia entry, the powerplant is so expensive, the sums of money are hard to frame.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most humans have no comprehension of $100 million, but understand $10, 000.

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Deb Nystrom, REVELN's curator insight, March 24, 12:27 PM

This is a post useful for anyone connected to public sector meetings, or any meeting with complex topics.  I've posted this in change leadership watch for the reasons of asking you, the reader the question, have you ever helped a decision making body avoid the The Abilene Paradox, a classic management film about avoiding mismanaged agreement?

This post also illustrates the power of Parkinson's Law where board members lazily skip over the seemingly impenetrable problem in the meeting, deferring to the team managing the project. There will be implications for years of this city council meeting's decisions, and yet it is decided in three minutes.  It's astounding, assuming we haven't been excluded from a long list of previous meeting discussions.   ~ D

Tom Russell's curator insight, March 27, 7:00 AM

I'm sure we can all identify with this scenario. It reminds me of a school football game when everybody is running after the ball regardless of their agreed position on the pitch. Clearly where there is passion there is engagement, so focussing on, and agreeing, clear outcomes is a key starting point if one is going to avoid everyone being kicked in the shins.

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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A surprising new argument against using kids’ test scores to grade their teachers

A surprising new argument against using kids’ test scores to grade their teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This time, the question is whether some teachers tend to teach better children, skewing their students' test results.

Via Christopher Tienken
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is no basis for using test scores to grade teachers. Learning and test scores are students' responsibilities. We need people who know what teachers do in the classroom to provide feedback for teachers to help improve their work.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Why Our Complex World Needs Connective Leadership

Why Our Complex World Needs Connective Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“Diversity trumps ability” as a sufficiently diverse, large group of non-experts often outperforms a small group of experts,” found Future Perfect authorSteven Johnson. In our increasingly complex, disruptive world, we will face more situations where we’ll benefit from calling on the so-called wisdom of the crowd.


Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

That leadership begins in Schools where diversity walks in, logs on, etc. each day. It is not happening but it is where it can happen.

 

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John Lasschuit ®™'s curator insight, Today, 10:44 AM

Kare Anderson argues the need for #Connective #Leadership and explains it.

Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, Today, 1:41 PM

This is Connected Educators month. We talk more and more about collaboration and working well together. While I'm not convinced the crowd is always the wisest, I think it's likely we'll hear more creative ideas from the crowd than if we work exclusive of the so-called non-experts.

Linda Alexander's curator insight, Today, 2:33 PM

"Diversity trumps ability" is a clear message to all classroom teachers, institutions & business innovation organizers.  

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Can we find democracy in the classroom?

Can we find democracy in the classroom? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings October 21, 2014 Can we find democracy in the classroom? “There can never be peace between nations until there is first known that true peace which is within the souls of men.” Black...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an important question. Luminaries such as Dewey, Ranciere, Freire, etc. wrote about this topic and question.

 

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Small Schools Work in New York ~ NY Times Editorial

Small Schools Work in New York ~ NY Times Editorial | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

by the Editorial Board of the NY Times

 

"Mayor Bill de Blasio has been critical of the signature education strategy of his predecessor, Mike Bloomberg, a strategy that involved closing large, failing high schools and replacing them with smaller specialized schools that offer a more rigorous curriculum and a more personal brand of instruction. But over the last few years, the Bloomberg approach has been vindicated by an innovative, multiyear study showing that the poor, minority students who attend small specialized schools do better academically than students in a control group who attend traditional high schools.


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Small Schools work because students and teachers can have healthy and supportive relationships.

 

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4 Keys to Designing the Classroom of the Future -- THE Journal

4 Keys to Designing the Classroom of the Future -- THE Journal | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Forget about rows of desks pointed at a whiteboard. Here's how mobile technology is reshaping teaching and learning.

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

So the images make the classroom look quite similar to classrooms of the past with students sitting alone. The key difference is they each have a laptop. Is that really different?

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, October 20, 2:11 PM

"Interactive whiteboards are on their way out." This kind of pronouncement is true for so much of technology and leads to many of the challenges educators face. What do we get? How long will it last? Will we have just gotten folks trained on the new tech when there's even newer, possibly better stuff available?


To the last question: Count on it. And plan your learning environments for flexibility because there is no way to anticipate precisely what any changes will warrant.

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Learners don't know what's best for them

Learners don't know what's best for them | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Annie Murphy Paul has a nice article about autodidacts -- yes, there are some, but most of us aren't.  MOOCs are mostly for autodidacts.  The paper from Educational Psychologist is excellent, and I...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Hubert Dreyfus' model of skill acquisition supports the idea that most learning requires teaching. There is a point where students would lack enough knowledge and wisdom to direct their learning fully. The idea is not no input but being helped along the path.

 

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for the love of learning: 3 reasons to stop rewarding and punishing children

for the love of learning: 3 reasons to stop rewarding and punishing children | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Intrinsic motivation is an internal ordering and responds to the question about how we make sense of the world. Extrinsic motivation is an external ordering where someone tries to create a product based on often alien outcomes for the child and adult.

 

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10 Facts About Being Homeless in the USA by Bill Quigley

10 Facts About Being Homeless in the USA by Bill Quigley | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
10 Facts About Being Homeless in the USA by Bill Quigley As the Crisis Deepens, the Government is Doing Less to Help... Three True Stories... Renee Delisle was one of over 3500 homeless people in S...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Although it looks at homelessness through an American lens, the article is a reminder to Canadians about the issues of poverty and homelessness in wealthy countries.

 

What are the impacts on children and School?

 

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How Should Professional Development Change?

How Should Professional Development Change? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 


Via Gust MEES, Bruno Koffi
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Without choice and voice, professional development might be training which is for seals and not human beings.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 18, 9:07 AM
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

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Schooling Beyond Measure

articles by alfie kohn

Via Karen Kurczak
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Although controversial at times, Kohn offers a different perspective on a range of issues i.e. standardized testing.

 

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Maintaining Your Sanity In The Pressure Game Of Teaching

Maintaining Your Sanity In The Pressure Game Of Teaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Maintaining Your Sanity In The Pressure Game Of Teaching

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The keep listening and talking are important. Listen closely to others and find your voice.

 

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48 million Americans live in poverty, Census Bureau says

48 million Americans live in poverty, Census Bureau says | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
48 million Americans are living in poverty according to the latest Census report.

Via Official AndreasCY, Christopher Tienken
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Canada's percentage of people in poverty would be similar, perhaps slightly less i.e. 12%. What does that mean for School?

 

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Christopher Tienken's curator insight, October 17, 4:52 PM

It's ok. Common Core and national testing will help....

Russell R. Roberts, Jr.'s curator insight, October 18, 1:09 AM

There is no excuse for 48 million of our citizens living in marginal housing and earning substandard wages, while we spend billions to police the world.  Our first priority should be to help the less fortunate in our own country , then, if anything remains, extend help to others. Congress needs to straighten out its priorities.  Aloha, Russ.

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Leadership is More Than Skin Deep -

Leadership is More Than Skin Deep - | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Some people understand leadership to be like an article of clothing. They believe they can put leadership on or take it off as they need it. Some of us see a quality or skill in a window and decide to add it to our leadership ensemble. They may add a scarf or shoes to their leadership wardrobe …

Via Anne Leong, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am reading Arne Naess' work on deep ecology. Most of what we do is superficial. It takes hard work to go deep.

 

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Homework: An unnecessary evil? … Surprising findings from new research

Homework: An unnecessary evil? … Surprising findings from new research | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A new study on the academic effects of homework offers not only some intriguing results but also a lesson on how to read a study -- and a reminder of the importance of doing just that: reading studies (carefully) rather than relying on summaries by journalists or even by the researchers themselves. Alfie Kohn explains.

Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found that unless parents could help (not do) with the homework assigning it was counter-productive. Quite often, I would ask students to have a conversation with parents about a social issue or something of that nature.

 

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Vygotsky on Collective Creativity

Vygotsky on Collective Creativity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I just re-read a classic article about creativity, written almost 100 years ago by the legendary Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky. Vygotsky's theory--that innovations emerge from social networks a...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

An excellent summary of some classic thinking about creativity.

 

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seepn110_b's curator insight, Today, 1:20 PM

An interesting approach from the great Vygotsky,

in our day's also we talk about collective Intelligence

 

 

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Leadership Tips: 6 Powerful Questions to Ask Yourself Daily

Leadership Tips: 6 Powerful Questions to Ask Yourself Daily | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“If you really want to create a shift in your business and get the most from your leadership, make these powerful questions part of your daily ritual.”


Via Anne Leong, John Michel, Josée Lafontaine, Bobby Dillard, Dean J. Fusto, Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Be the change that you want to see in the world - Gandhi.

 

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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, October 20, 12:03 PM

Self reflection questions to make you a better leader. 

Web Connect Agency's curator insight, October 20, 10:44 PM

www.webconnectagency.com

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What Happens When Parents Decide to Opt-Out of Standardized Tests?

What Happens When Parents Decide to Opt-Out of Standardized Tests? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Parents are increasingly worried that the emphasis on standardized test scores is destroying children's love of learning.

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Only good things can happen when parents exert their rights when it comes to standardized testing of any form.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, October 20, 1:10 PM

Sure, we celebrate this rebellion against standardized tests, the latest punching bag in all that's wrong with education. And yet, we recognize that we want a mechanism to measure where our kids are. And yet, we worry about the overabundance of "big data." and yet, we wonder if we have enough of the "right" data. And yet, we wonder how we compare against other kids, other schools, other states, other countries. And yet, we want to empower our kids to learn and grow. And yet, we don't want them to fall behind. And yet. . . .


In other words, much of what we do in school conspires to exhaust students and teachers and administrators and parents in what and how we teach. Reform isn't changing this and fixing that. Reform is hard work that takes time and for which there has to be a plan, and for which there must be realistic expectations.


I'm not a fan of standardized tests, but I'm not a fan of making change for the sake of change. When we institute any changes at any level for any reason, we have to know why and what we hope to accomplish, and we have to have tried to consider possible unintended consequences.

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Transformational Leadership - The Latest Thinking in Leading Effective Teams

Transformational Leadership - The Latest Thinking in Leading Effective Teams | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Understand what Transformational Leadership is and how to use it to really drive people-centred success.


Via Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Transforming leading (the use of gerunds suggests ongoing and never-ending) is ethics based.

 

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What I Wish I'd Known as a New Teacher

What I Wish I'd Known as a New Teacher | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Now, almost two decades after my first year in the classroom, here's a few things I wish I'd known about myself, about teaching, and about my students.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The fact we have about 50% of young teachers leaving the profession within the first seven years of beginning and an increasing number of part-time contracts being used suggests a need for a different conversation.

 

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It's Privilege (and Race), not Effort

It's Privilege (and Race), not Effort | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In the tradition of Mel Riddile (see here and here), I want to assert: In the U.S., it's privilege (and race), not effort. The U.S. has a powerful addiction to a false myth, the myth of meritocracy...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When  children come to School hungry, tired, abused, etc. what should we expect in their learning. It takes a special effort to reach out and build bridges with those students. It takes caring teachers and safe relationships.

 

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Ready to Learn? The Key Is Listening With Intention

Ready to Learn? The Key Is Listening With Intention | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Listening and observing can be passive activities—in one ear and out the other, as our mothers used to say. Or they can be rich, active, intense experiences that lead to serious learning.


Via Cindy Riley Klages, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students need to be helped in learning how to listen. It is not something that comes without help.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, October 18, 8:56 PM

I concur that good listening is a skill to be learned and practice. We need to model critical listening, too. It can easily be part of how we interact with our students.

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“Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong”

“Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong is a fascinating, and depressing, article in The Washington Post.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Meritocracy and the idea that we all have the same opportunities do not exist in School.

 

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Brain baloney has no place in the classroom

Brain baloney has no place in the classroom | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Pete Etchells: A study published this week brilliantly debunks myths about the brain that pervade the education system

Via Sandeep Gautam, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is the second article in the last few days with this as the theme.

 

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Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, October 18, 9:13 AM

Some neuromyths are so strangely resistant!

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How Can Students Have More Say in School Decisions?

How Can Students Have More Say in School Decisions? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Administrators, educators and students are discovering ways to include students in the programs that affect them most. Some programs help students speak directly to the people in charge.

Via Grant Montgomery, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder if providing teachers with more voice would be helpful?

 

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25 Practices That Foster Lifelong Learning - InformED

25 Practices That Foster Lifelong Learning - InformED | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Is your capacity for learning is fixed or fluid? Can you improve your intelligence and talents through hard work and practice, or are you stuck with the brains you’ve got? Stanford psychologist Carol Dweck says most of us have either a “fixed” or “growth” mindset when it comes to learning. Most of us can get through sixteen years of schooling regardless of which mindset we have, but when it comes to lifelong learning–learning for the sake of learning, without outside pressure–only a growth mindset will cut it."


Via Beth Dichter, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Learning is an essential aspect of living. I am not an advocate of the glib language that is fostered in 7 Habits thinking i.e. begin with the end in mine. It is great to have goals, but learning is often a non-linear, complex, chaotic process which defies that limited logic. The Dewey quote is echoed in the thinking of many others i.e. Whitehead, Montessori, Gadamer, etc. It is not just about learning. It is about forming and character which exceeds simple learning.

 

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Saberes Sin Fronteras Ong's curator insight, October 18, 12:15 PM

EDUCAR NO ES ENSEÑAR A VIVIR, LA COMUNICACION EDUCADOR-ALUMNO ES LA VIDA

Tony Guzman's curator insight, October 20, 9:47 AM

I am a firm believer of lifelong learning and this

Li Banban's curator insight, October 20, 8:23 PM

keep a growth mindset! its never too late to  learn.