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Why Learning Innovation Can't Come From Teachers Alone

Why Learning Innovation Can't Come From Teachers Alone | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Why Learning Innovation Can't Come From Teachers Alone

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we use words that make it sound like learning and teaching are linear processes that can be planned in advance, I shudder. Teaching is something that is by its nature creative. If it is not creative, it cannot be teaching.

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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Tinkering with Kids – Get in It for the Long Haul | MAKE

Tinkering with Kids – Get in It for the Long Haul | MAKE | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Why do we educators do it? It's fun enough tinkering around with projects on our own, so why must we bang our heads trying to involve a pack of screaming kids from the neighborhood? I've thought through this before, ...

Via Cammie Dunaway, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students love making things. I found we could set up projects in the classroom and students would finish them at home with parents supervising. I always clarified the parents' roles as supervisory. It worked well and students learned complex concepts more easily building projects.

 

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Cammie Dunaway's curator insight, March 24, 3:01 PM

Well said.  Working with Young Makers is equal parts frustration and inspiration.  But the lightbulb moments make it ultimately worthwhile!

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Maya Angelou on Courage and Facing Evil

Maya Angelou on Courage and Facing Evil | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"There is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic, because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing."

In 1

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need the courage to create ourselves daily. That is a wonderful quote which speaks to the roots of the word courage. Courage comes from coeur which means heart. We are on a daily journey and journey comes from the word journee which is not a measure of time but connotes the idea of journey in a timeless way.

 

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The Advantages of Dyslexia

The Advantages of Dyslexia | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
With reading difficulties can come other cognitive strengths

...

"The trick that makes Escher’s drawings intriguing is a geometric construction psychologists refer to as an “impossible figure,” a line-form suggesting a three-dimensional object that could never exist in our experience. Psychologists, including a team led by Catya von Károlyi of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, have used such figures to study human cognition. When the team asked people to pick out impossible figures from similarly drawn illustrations that did not violate causality, they were surprised to discover that some people were faster at this than others. And most surprising of all, among those who were the fastest were those with dyslexia.

"Dyslexia is often called a “learning disability.” And it can indeed present learning challenges. Although its effects vary widely, children with dyslexia read so slowly that it would typically take them a half a year to read the same number of words other children might read in a day. Therefore, the fact that people who read so slowly were so adept at picking out the impossible figures was a big surprise to the researchers. After all, why would people who are slow in reading be fast at responding to visual representations of causal reasoning?"


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We have privileged the written language and marginalized visuals and imagery. There are many forms of creativity. I had students who read slowly and wrote poorly but were great artists and poets. Those things are not valued in School. I wonder who decided on that?

 

Learning disabilities may not be disabilities. They may be different ways of learning. I watched students share their abilities. The artist helped the writers who helped the artists.

 

I listened to a key note speaker who had little teaching experience and had rushed through teaching to get out of the classroom ridicule the use of haiku in teaching. Yet, I found students enjoyed writing poetry and drawing more than they enjoyed his passion, digital technologies. School managers and experts should spend time with students and learn what students enjoy.

 

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What makes a conference really irritating?

What makes a conference really irritating? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Conferences are part and parcel of academic life - and there are plenty of ways in which they can be extremely irritating.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found that when I chose my conferences I enjoyed them. When I was ordered to go to any professional development, better seen as training and indoctrination, it was irritating.I can read about the latest tech fad, the habits that make us more effective, and uncritical critical thinking if I want. What I really, really want is choice that makes sense in may context

 

Meaning plays a huge role.

 

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Wings and Webs: Transforming Learning Through Social Networking

Find Resources at http://weconnect.pbworks.com/

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Srimayee Dam
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The slide with the butterfly flapping its wings needs some clarification. It is not that a butterfly can create a tornado. It is that initial events have lasting and amplifying effects. It is similar to saying first impressions are lasting. The quote about changing the world should be understood in the Ghandian context of the change beginning with one's self. For the amplifying first impressions to be fruitful, perhaps it is our attitude which undergoes the changing.

 

The School managers I worked for the last few years (5-8) were all about changing us without changing themselves. One told us he was working on being less sarcastic in our first staff meeting with him. During the years I worked for him, there seemed to be little improvement. He was sarcastic in public and private. This makes his change negative change. Knowing what we need to change and not changing it is problematic.

 

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5 Signs Your Employees Dislike You

5 Signs Your Employees Dislike You | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In addition to all of your achievements, you're sure that you're a great boss. After all, your leadership skills have helped you climb the ladder of success. But some of the world's top companies succeed in spite of poor leadership, a result of great products or concepts rather than motivated team members.

 

According to entrepreneurial counselor Michelle McQuaid, bad bosses cost businesses $360 billion in lost productivity every year. The stress caused by difficult supervisors can negatively affect an employee's overall health and workplace morale, eventually driving him or her out the door. Since losing one employee costs a business tens of thousands of dollars or more, your business will eventually suffer financially if you can't keep employee loss at a minimum.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder if in School we consider that 1/2 of new teachers leave the profession within 7 years? That does not account for those who obtain a degree and never enter the classroom. What does that mean in relationship to high staff turnover?

 

One way to look at leaders who are not liked is are they leading or managing. We need both, but I found many School managers focused on managing people and avoiding leading.

 

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 18, 6:50 PM

If you look closely, you may find indications that you're not as popular with your staff as you think you are.

Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, August 19, 10:15 PM

PDGLead

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Back to School: A Surefire Strategy for Building Classroom Community

Back to School: A Surefire Strategy for Building Classroom Community | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Blogger Anne Shaw highlights a fun, beginning-of-the-year strategy that includes a roll of toilet paper.

Via Alexandra Duarte, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I have done this in several settings and it might work. It just did not in the settings I was in those times. It might have been a lack of time. What is important is community. I don't think there is one sure fire strategy. Open communication, including listening closely, being vulnerable, honest, trustworthy, etc. are important in community. It is about working through conflict and difference in ways that allow us to open up. That might begin with a strategy like this one, but needs continuous follow through.

 

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Alexandra Duarte's curator insight, August 18, 4:07 PM

A roll of toilet paper :) to start the school year :))))))

 

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The Conversation Teachers Need To Have With Leadership

The Conversation Teachers Need To Have With Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

This year, many of us will spend hours in school meetings feeling demotivated, bored, unappreciated, and stressed. We will spend a lot of time resenting our colleagues and our administrators, which will impact our teaching and our students’ success. It doesn’t have to be this way. You deserve to have your time valued, because you are on a grand mission to help the world learn. We need you inspired! Unfortunately, many of our administrators do not know how to value your time or support you. Therefore, I’m sending you on a mission to have a conversation with your leadership about changing how meetings are organized at your school. By having this one positive conversation with your leadership, you can possibly avoid wasting hours attending ineffective meetings. You will also do your school, staff, and students a tremendous amount of good, since meetings will focus on collaboration with peers to problem solve issues.


Via Patti Kinney, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most of the professional development I experienced the last 5-8 years I taught was imposed. It was a School manager's idea of what we should do rather than what I thought was important in my classroom. It made little difference what I said. I was forced to attend sessions on critical thinking, the latest in digital technology, and the habits that we needed to indoctrinate students with. Rather than just argue, I went, put in my time, and planned something I felt was relevant to my situation.

 

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Quotes for building determination

Quotes for building determination | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Winston Churchill “If you are going through hell, keep going.” Randy Pausch “The brick walls are there for a reason. The brick walls are not there to keep us out. The brick walls are there to give ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Here are some great quotes that can be used with students and in classrooms.

 

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The similarities between successful teaching, professional development, and leadership #IN

The similarities between successful teaching, professional development, and leadership #IN | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In my view, a common set of principles regarding human learning and relationships underlie teaching, professional development, and leadership that intends to continuously improve teaching and learning.

 


Via Patti Kinney, John Gravitt, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The challenge for teachers is that those outside the classroom telling them how to do their jobs have whittled the work down to a science only approach. Dennis Sparks makes the valid point it is an improvisational art which cannot be designed externally. What is designed is subject to change which is part of a complex conversation teachers engage in with students and with the subjects taught. In this sense, all the subjects take on a life.

 

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John Gravitt's curator insight, August 8, 7:07 AM

I've always hated the phase "Those that can't do, teach."  People assume sometimes that I went into training because I "couldn't" consult.  Could it be that I didn't want to work crazy hours every week away from home?

 

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How 21st Century Learning Fits Into The Common Core - Edudemic

How 21st Century Learning Fits Into The Common Core - Edudemic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
At a time when many teachers and parents (and students!) can feel overwhelmed by the seeming overabundance of standardized tests and educational standards more generally, it falls to the teacher to help the students and parents understand how all of this fits into the larger picture of what students will need to know and be …

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I have never been sure how an overabundance of standardized tests (I think one is an overabundance) can be explained. It does not fall to the teacher to explain it. It falls to teachers to decry it.

 

Ask, "How do we test being an innovative problem solver with a standardized test?" The word standard suggests something that is consistent. Innovation is perhaps without consistency and measure.

 

What if politicians, technocrats, bureaucrats, etc. took tests and we measured them on the results? If they failed, they are fired? I don't think they would like it.

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Future-focused learning report - Ministry of Education

Future-focused learning in connected communities report from the Associate Education Minister Nikki Kaye's 21st Century Learning Reference Group.

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The strategic priorities are universal, however the particulars of a particular setting are part of a complex conversation. 21st Century learning (I like the way it is all capitalized) cannot look the same from one classroom to the next. How do we expect it look the same from one School to the next? There needs to be a fleshing out of the priorities at the local level.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, August 17, 5:34 PM

I share this only because these issues and topics seem to be universal. Now if we can only get some specificity to the actions that need to be taken.

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#3 Tackle tough conversations

#3 Tackle tough conversations | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We all know the feeling - knowing that you need to have a difficult conversation with someone, but not wanting to jump in.  The longer you go on dreading it, the worse it gets.  So resolve to tackl...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first point is crucial. What do I need to know about my attitude and what can be changed about it? It does not mean we compromise things we value and think are valuable. It might provide greater insight into their importance.

 

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Back to School Messages

Back to School Messages | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here is a document from Jo with her 7 favorite messages to set positive classroom norms for the start of the school year.  The last page is a summary that you can post in your classroom.  Positive ...

Via Tom Perran
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The messages allow the beginnings of conversations which can lead to classroom norms continuously being negotiated.

 

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Tom Perran's curator insight, August 19, 6:13 PM

Back-to-school messages from Jo Boaler on setting a positive tone in the mathematics classroom this year. 

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TELL ME WHAT YOU PLAN TO DO WITH YOUR ONE WILD AND PRECIOUS LIFE - Mary Oliver

TELL ME WHAT YOU PLAN TO DO WITH YOUR ONE WILD AND  PRECIOUS LIFE - Mary Oliver | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Quote on a poster. Thick, durable, matte perfection, shouting out your message. Printed on archival, acid-free paper. Ships worldwide. Starting at $18

Via Ken Morrison
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mary Oliver is one of my favourite poets.

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Home schooling and child custody

Home schooling and child custody | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Divorcing parent A wants to home-school the children. Divorcing parent B doesn't. Should a court prefer parent B as the custodial parent, on the theory that home-schooling is generally against the child's best interests?

Via Terry Harding
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some interesting points made in the article. I worked with home school families and for some of them, ideology and religion played a role in their choices. I think they were in the minority, but still a fair percentage of families.

 

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Terry Harding's curator insight, August 19, 7:49 PM

Things can become quite tricky when you combine home schooling and the family court as this US lawyer explains.

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#UnschoolingRules: #unrules26 - Biologically, the necessary order of learning is: explore, then play, then add rigor.

#UnschoolingRules: #unrules26 - Biologically, the necessary order of learning is: explore, then play, then add rigor. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Play is an important concept in learning and should extend to all learning including adult. It is the serious business of learning and was highly recommended by Piaget, Montessori, Dewey, Gadamer, etc. Rigour is added slowly and carefully as the learner gains confidence.

 

School is not a place of play. The play there is usually contrived and misses the point.

 

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Mastering the Teaching Game - Edutopia

Mastering the Teaching Game - Edutopia | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“ After listening to an interview with top tennis coach Sven Groeneveld, Carol Tomlinson clarifies eight essential principles that teaching shares with high-level sports coaching.”


Via John Evans, simondcollins
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The word mastering is not necessarily the right word, but the points made by Carol Tomlinson are valid. I spent 20 plus years teaching and found I was not close to mastering teaching. That is good. It made me curious and always looking for more.

 

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How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn - KQED (blog)

How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn - KQED (blog) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
KQED (blog)
How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn
KQED (blog)
Game-based approaches to learning are far favored over “drill-and-kill” exercises.

Via Jim Goldsmith, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found many students did not always know what they wanted down the road in life. They knew what gave meaning to life in concrete ways, in the moment, and shared that in their learning. I imagine over time it feeds into that long-term purpose.

 

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Jim Goldsmith's curator insight, August 18, 4:35 PM

From the article:  "The students with a purposeful-learning attitude (who agreed with socially oriented statements like “I want to become an educated citizen that can contribute to society”) scored higher on measures of grit and self-control than classmates who only reported self-oriented motives for learning such as wanting to get a good job or earn more money. The purposeful learners were also less likely to succumb to the digital distractions, answering more math problems on the diligence task — and they were more likely to be enrolled in college the following fall, the researchers found."  Worth reading.

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Preparing for Cultural Diversity: Resources for Teachers

Preparing for Cultural Diversity: Resources for Teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How can teachers prepare for diverse classrooms? There isn't a definitive answer, but there is a wealth of resources online. Here, blogger Matt Davis rounds up some helpful links for teachers.

Via Alexandra Duarte, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think of all classrooms, regardless of how homogeneous they look, as multicultural. Each person, including the teacher, brings something of them into the classroom that is personally cultural. This is not just about ethnicity, race, religion, etc. and those are important. It is about each person being a unique person and not a nameless individual in a classroom.

 

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Alexandra Duarte's curator insight, August 18, 4:09 PM

Very important these days evne in remote places...

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10 Good Habits to Develop an Innovative Mind | Hongkiat.com

10 Good Habits to Develop an Innovative Mind | Hongkiat.com | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

If I could sum it all up, creativity is really about being able to see associations when others couldn’t. Being innovative, on the other hand, is about coming up with something others have not thought of.

 

Whether is it inventing a new product or coming up with solutions to a problem, innovativeness requires creativity because one has to be capable of connecting abstract ideas and facts with existing scenarios before creating something unique and different.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed., Dean J. Fusto, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think it is the same thing, but being curious and seeing the world through a prism of wonder is essential to innovating and creating. Small children do this and their world is a place of wonder, wonder filled, and wonderful.

 

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, August 18, 6:01 PM

These habits can develop higher order thinking skills and creativity which can be modified and included into your teaching and learning environment.  

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NAPLAN results. Teachers' fault.

NAPLAN results. Teachers' fault. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
No NAPLAN Improvement – Teachers to Blame. While many thought that results would be announced in September, NAPLAN results are available now....at least to the press. Monday 18 August S.M.H. reveal...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Perhaps the easiest thing those not in classrooms can do is blame teachers. It seems universal. Politicians, bureaucrats, and managers order what is to be done from on high and fault teachers for being unable to implement it. A way around this might be for those who are managing things from afar to come down from the mount and try their hand in the classroom. I wonder if there is a reason many former classroom teachers are not in the classroom?

 

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4 principles of Student-Centered Learning

4 principles of Student-Centered Learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In our view, student-centered learning is a process of learning that puts the needs of the students over the conveniences of planning, policy, and procedure.

 

Like any phrase, “student-centered learning” is subjective and flexible–and only useful insofar as it ultimately supports the design of learning experiences for students. For example, arguing for a “student-centered approach” to creating curriculum frameworks that center the authentic knowledge needs of each student makes sense, while creating a “student-centered” classroom that gives students little choice in content, voice in product, or a human necessity for creative expression does not. Student-centeredness uses an actual person as an audience, and designs learning experiences backwards from that point.

 

With that in mind, here are 4 principles of student-centered learning to consider as you design curriculum and instruction.

 


Via Edumorfosis, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The graphic includes a lot about the teacher. Perhaps we should consider a teacher-centred classroom which allows student-centred learning to occur?

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Cutting Through The Fog of Student Achievement

Cutting Through The Fog of Student Achievement | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

This post was originally posted on Figuring It Out by J. Bevacqua I recently had the opportunity to spend two days working with and listening to John Hattie and his team at Visible Learning unpac...


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson, Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Is there a fog around student achievement? What is student achievement? It seems the fog is purposely placed around the concept so we can continue to have discussions which result in an unending parade of bottom lines.

 

What if captured teacher voice as well?

 

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The Most Dangerous Phrase In Education

The Most Dangerous Phrase In Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The Most Dangerous Phrase In Education

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a corollary phrase which is equally as dangerous. We have to change. Both suggest binaries which need to be dissolved. Change is always happening. The key is that we need to ask, "Is this the change we want?" This question suggests a conversation rather than heavy-handed, top-down measures. The latter is about doing it the same way we always have and pretending a handful of people hold the key to successful change. Do they?

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, August 17, 5:40 PM

I think it's one of the most dangerous phrases in any industry. It stops conversation immediately. It closes the door on possibilities. It states quite clearly that creativity is forbidden and that even thoughtful consideration of the status quo is treading on dangerous ground. It indicates that mindless obedience to What Is is far more important than even the tiniest step in the direction of change.