Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
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Charting how organisational culture fails

Charting how organisational culture fails | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I'm running a workshop next week around the CAIR Model of pressure on organisational culture: it's an exploration of how cultures fail because of internal pressures. Essentially it's a friction bet...

Via Mariano Sbert Balaguer, Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

The idea that culture is being constantly co-created thus co-owned is important in community. Trust plays a critical role in that. Too often in schools, we go for what is easy and not what works which is the hard work of listening closely to each other and acknowledging differences exist.

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 2014 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine, PhD I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
Alan Jordan's curator insight, April 3, 2016 4:13 PM

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Change #leadership: how to give employees a sense of control

Change #leadership: how to give employees a sense of control | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The critical factor when it comes to deciding on or agreeing to doing anything differently (this is a simple definition of change), is that there is usually something beneficial in it producing a co-created outcome.

Put simply; draw your leaders out so they understand not only the reasons for change, but also how they can influence the way that change is implemented - this will mean they feel part of the solution.

The same goes for bringing about change within the team; really involve them, talk to them at length, listen to them at length, ask for their solutions and find ways of incorporating their ideas for the changes needed, as well as good reasons as to why some of their ideas may not be applicable.


Via Roger Francis, Ricard Lloria, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
When we are asked to change things in a wholesale manner, it is daunting and overwhelming. The example of changing my golf swing resonated. I did that several years ago and it was a terrible experience. Once I adjusted, it worked well. Teachers given small bites of change and taking on some leading might manage those changes better
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Sir Ken Robinson: “There are processes that are more likely to encourage innovation than not.”

Sir Ken Robinson: “There are processes that are more likely to encourage innovation than not.” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Sir Ken Robinson gave the most viewed TED talk of all time,

Via LEBLOND, juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Robinson's point about organizations, on average, lasting about 30 years is important. We have used the same model of schooling for much longer i.e. warehousing and preparing children for the work place. Why have we not changed?
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Get Rid Of Your High Expectations – Art Of Practicality – Medium

Get Rid Of Your High Expectations – Art Of Practicality – Medium | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How many times in your life have you experienced hurt, disappointment, anger, or stress, from the difference between your imagination and reality? We’re very creative creatures. And when we set out…

Via Pintolaranja, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
One has to have reasonable expectations. High and low get us into binary and impractical ways of thinking. As a teacher, understanding what was reasonable for each student helped me establish my expectations.
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In Just 3 Words, Amazon's Jeff Bezos Taught a Brilliant Lesson in Leadership

It's a great lesson for the workplace. And outside of it.
Via Vicki Moro
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I would like to believe "disagree and commit" will work in schools, but there is little evidencce of this being the case. It cannot be wholesale anarchy, but what does each teacher's experience tell them. It is always going to be different from the next teacher.
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friday’s good finds

friday’s good finds | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds.

Via Ricard Lloria
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There are some interesting points made in the quotes and comments. The Frank Sonneberg quotes point out the need to understand we live in a world where there is a lot of in-between that goes unnoticed and is taken-for-granted
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Why Kids Shouldn’t Sit Still in Class - NYTimes.com

Why Kids Shouldn’t Sit Still in Class - NYTimes.com | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
It is not only children, but adults.
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Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 21, 3:42 PM
I watched our "guru" of all things tech turn the lights off, sit at his desk, blog and tweet, and put worksheets up on the overhead for students. Even with new tools, we teach and learn much the same way we always have, sitting at desks and with a front of the room. Activity is essential in learning and teaching.
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Peter Senge: How to Overcome Learning Disabilities in Organizations

Peter Senge: How to Overcome Learning Disabilities in Organizations | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As an organization grows, managing the flow demands work items to move from one team/department to another. In quest to make these teams accountable, very specific KPI’s are established and that breeds non-systemic thinking. People look at meeting their own numbers and push the work to next stage

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
A quick overview of how to overcome not being a learning organization.
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Why do we work so hard?

Why do we work so hard? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Our jobs have become prisons from which we don’t want to escape.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is a good question, which is well-explored in the article.
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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, April 17, 5:05 AM

Work follows us home on our smartphones, tugging at us during an evening out or in the middle of our children’s bedtime routines. It makes permanent use of valuable cognitive space, and chooses odd hours to pace through our thoughts, shoving aside whatever might have been there before. It colonises our personal relationships and uses them for its own ends. It becomes our lives if we are not careful. It becomes us.

Ron McIntyre's curator insight, April 22, 8:03 AM

Is this a true picture of work?

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Marc My Words: I Took a Birding Course and Got a Lesson in Performance Support by Marc Rosenberg : Learning Solutions Magazine

Marc My Words: I Took a Birding Course and Got a Lesson in Performance Support by Marc  Rosenberg : Learning Solutions Magazine | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
“Maybe I have too much time on my hands, but I recently took a birding course. Exciting, huh? The four-hour course, offered by the Rookery Bay Reserve in Naples, Florida, was terrific. I learned a lot about birds, but not in the way you might think.”

Via juandoming
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
This is an interesting article. The last line about finding things where we least expect themn is great.
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Why Employees Live In Fear

Why Employees Live In Fear | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“You challenge my direction too much. You do more than I ask you to do.” Does this feel familiar?

 

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D., Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
There is a real fear among managers that someone will outshine them. I experienced school managers who dictated to teachers what was to be done in classrooms.
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Creating Space: Baking Equity & Justice into Leadership Development Work | Leadership Learning Community

Creating Space: Baking Equity & Justice into Leadership Development Work | Leadership Learning Community | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Turn on the news and there is little doubt, equity is under assault... from attempts to repeal ACA, taxation proposals to cut taxes for corporations and the wealthy, to attacks on undocumented workers and Muslims.

Via june holley
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Equity is a better way of understanding what we want. Equality signals things can somehow be the same for each person. When we treat our students equally, we fail to see each of them as "exceptional" people.
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Teachers Going Gradeless – Arthur Chiaravalli – Medium

Teachers Going Gradeless – Arthur Chiaravalli – Medium | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I realized that my assessment practices were bogged down by an overemphasis on scores and my total domination of assessment and grading. This year, I changed my approach, using feedback and revisions only, without entering a letter grade until the end of each term. At that point, I allow students an opportunity to evaluate their overall performance using statements from my Descriptive Grading Criteria (adapted from Ken O’Connor’s 15 Fixes for Broken Grades). Upon completing this process, they sign up to conference with me personally, or complete a linked letter or video explaining the grade they believe they deserve.

Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
I did this a number of years ago and it works well. I used rubrics and went over them with students. It allowed students to focus on their progress and ask questions along the way. I also was able to go back to the rubric with each student. As well, editing the rubrics was essential. What did I learn?
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David W. Deeds's curator insight, April 12, 9:06 PM

Would be nice! Thanks to Ivon Prefontaine. 

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How to Be an Inspiring Leader

How to Be an Inspiring Leader | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
You need one standout strength.

Via donhornsby, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
If I apply this to teaching, it would focus on a question: "Which teacher inspired me? How did they make me feel?" For me, those teachers stood out for some particular reason that was singular to them and me. On the other hand, they may not have been each student's cup of tea.
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donhornsby's curator insight, Today, 9:52 AM
Inspirational leaders recognize the need to pick their moments carefully to reinforce a performance culture in a way that can also be inspiring. These are real moments of leadership and truth.
 
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People Don’t Want Something Truly New, They Want the Familiar Done Differently.

People Don’t Want Something Truly New, They Want the Familiar Done Differently. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

I’ll admit, the bento box is an unlikely place to learn an important business lesson. But consider the California Roll —
Understanding the impact of this icon of Japanese dining can make all the difference between the success or failure of your product.




Via Steve Krogull, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Something that is totally new is challenging. Hans-Georg Gadamer contended little changes and most of the change occurs on the periphery/margins. Consider how little schools have changed. They make look a bit different, but are they? Do we teach totally different? I don' t think so, but it is OK. When we change everything all at once, the risk of failing is daunting. If we fail, it means starting over. John Dewey argued we conserve what is useful and morally right and replace what is not in both categories.
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School Choice Advocacy Exposes Political Cowardice

It has become fashionable for pundits to argue that fake news has created a post-truth America; however, mainstream media, in fact, carry the brunt of the responsibility because too often journalists are trapped in press-release journalism and traditional expectations of objectivity. Evidence of this can be found in how the media routinely cover education and education…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
School choice is not a big issue in Alberta. It has flown below the radar using what are called academies embedded in a public school as cover. The problem with school choice, and I think this article points us in that direction, is there are challenges based on whether families have the resources and understanding of what it means to make choice.
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Disbobedient Teaching

Disbobedient Teaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Disbobedient Teaching Surviving and creating change in education Welby Ings This book is about disobedience. Positive disobedience. Disobedience as a kind of professional behaviour. It shows how teachers can survive and even influence an education system that does staggering damage to potential. More importantly it is an arm around the shoulder of disobedient teachers who…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Neil Postman and Charles Wiengartner wrote a book called Teaching as a Subversive Activity in 1969. They decried the outdated teaching methods of the time. I was in school then and my experience is teaching/school remains largely unchanged. It may look somewhat different, but it feels eerily the same. I think each teacher has the opportunity to be more than a pirate or rebel, becoming subversive and disobedient.
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Education Readings April 21st

Education Readings April 21st | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allanalach@inspire.net.nz The hidden dangers of caring about your career too much ‘This is one of the most important social justice and economic issues of our time. Until teachers feel valued and supported in their pursuit of…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Among the links are two articles about digital literacy, including one that focuses on dispelling certain myths, and how computers in classrooms are a "scandalous waste." The latter has some echoes of Larry Cuban and computers as over sold and under used
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The Price of Resistance: Chris Hedges

The Price of Resistance: Chris Hedges | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
To resist radical evil is to endure a life that by the standards of the wider society is a failure. It is to defy injustice at the cost of your career, your reputation, your financial solvency and at times your life. It is to be a lifelong heretic. And, perhaps this is the most important point, it is to accept that the dominant culture, even the liberal elites, will push you to the margins and attempt to discredit not only what you do, but your character. When I returned to the newsroom at The New York Times after being booed off a commencement stage in 2003 for denouncing the invasion of Iraq and being publicly reprimanded by the paper for my stance against the war, reporters and editors I had known and worked with for 15 years lowered their heads or turned away when I was nearby. They did not want to be contaminated by the same career-killing contagion.

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
The resistance at any level is high. Consider how hard it is to bring about real change (transforming change) in organizations such as schools? It is even more challenging in larger organizations and institutions. Paulo Freire's work has been diluted into Inquiry Based Learning, rather than being a means to lift oppression.
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Education Kills Our Creativity, Here Is How We Can Regain It

Education Kills Our Creativity, Here Is How We Can Regain It | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
School equips us with knowledge we need, and we have more than enough training in convergent thinking, but to be creative once we leave the education system, divergent thinking is what we need to work on, and here’s how:

Via Nik Peachey, Anne-Laure Delpech
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Society stresses the importance of education. Good grades in school propel a kid to a prestigious institution; and getting into a world-renowed college leads to a bright, successful future. And this generation is lucky, we are mostly well-educated."

We confuse school with education. If we replace educate and its various forms above with school, that focuses us on what the real issues are.
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Nik Peachey's curator insight, March 30, 10:31 AM

Sad but true.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, March 30, 4:42 PM
Diversity of ideas is essential in teaching and learning. Ask questions that do not have pre-determined answers. It can hold a space open for conversations.
John Rudkin's curator insight, April 4, 5:01 AM
I was promised things would change as I became a Design Educator - but "those who know best" just keep cocking it up.
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Disciplines of a Learning Organization: Peter Senge

Disciplines of a Learning Organization: Peter Senge | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If there is one book that has influenced my business thinking the most, it is Peter Senge’s “The Fifth Discipline – The Art and Practice of Learning Organization” and I have referred to it many times over past years on this blog. Written in 1990, the insights contained in this book are even

Via Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Schools by their very definition should be learning organizations, but are not.
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Everyday Sociology Blog: Neoliberalism: A Concept Every Sociologist Should Understand

Everyday Sociology Blog: Neoliberalism: A Concept Every Sociologist Should Understand | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Peter Kaufman I have a confession: When I teach sociology I am often guilty of ignoring one of the most important concepts that every sociologist should understand. In fact, one of the main reasons for writing this pos
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"neoliberalism is a “political economic practice” that promotes the total free will of individuals as economic actors. Neoliberals advocate for “strong private property rights, free markets, and free trade” with as little government intervention and regulation as possible. They seek to privatize institutions such as education, health care, and social services, and deregulate industries such as energy, communication, food, drugs, and finance."

The last line should be of greatest concern to educators. Gert Biesta and Bill Pinar question the pervasive nature of neo-liberalism in our schools.
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It's the Small Things That Make a Great Leader

It's the Small Things That Make a Great Leader | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Leadership development is slowly becoming like late night TV ads. Over the past few weeks, I get these notifications of leadership development seminars that promise to make you a terrific and dynamic leader:

“Become an effective leader if you do these 5 things”

“Leadership training to become the leader of tomorrow.”

If it were that easy everyone would be doing it, was one of my father’s favorite quotes.

My eyes roll as I read each one. There is no magic wand to becoming a better leader. Whether it is 3 days or 5 days, it is not going to happen.


Via Roger Francis, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"“Become an effective leader if you do these 5 things” “Leadership training to become the leader of tomorrow.” If it were that easy everyone would be doing it, was one of my father’s favorite quotes. My eyes roll as I read each one. There is no magic wand to becoming a better leader. Whether it is 3 days or 5 days, it is not going to happen."

When we pay attention to the details of our relationships, we lead.
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The Dangerous Academic is an Extinct Species | Current Affairs

The Dangerous Academic is an Extinct Species | Current Affairs | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via diane gusa
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
"Contrary to what capitalism’s mythologizers would have you believe, the contemporary world does not heap its rewards on those with the most creativity and courage. In fact, at every stage of life, those who venture beyond the safe boundaries of expectation are ruthlessly culled"

We want conformity and compliance.
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diane gusa's curator insight, April 13, 12:48 PM
Becoming a successful academic requires one hell of a lot of ass-kissing and up-sucking. You have to flatter and impress.  The academy could, potentially, be a place for unfettered intellectual daring... The overwhelming “adjunctification” of the university has meant that approximately 76% of professors… aren’t professors at all, but underpaid and overworked adjuncts, lecturers, and assistants...The corporatized university serves nobody and nothing except its own infinite growth. Students are indebted, professors lose job security, surrounding communities are surveilled and displaced. That is something dangerous.
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A Principal’s Dilemma

A Principal’s Dilemma | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A PRINCIPAL'S DILEMMA Primary school principalship used to be the most caring, most ethical, most intellectually demanding, most exciting of all the caring professions I was a proud primary school principal for quite a few years and, despite my later higher administrative duties, remained so until retirement.  I reckon that primary school principalship was the…
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
If each principal took this view and stood up in support of students and teachers, would that not be great. My experience was many principals seemed to foreget what it meant to be a teacher. I actually had one principal tell me he never wanted to be a teacher. He wanted to be a principal to tell teachers what to do. Today, that person is a consultant and presenter.
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10 work skills for the postnormal era – Work Futures

10 work skills for the postnormal era – Work Futures | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Dion Hinchcliffe tweeted out a graphic (not exactly the one below, but essentially the same) listing skills for 2020 in contrast to 2015 offered up by the World Economic Forum. He got me to thinking…

Via june holley, Bobby Dillard
Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's insight:
Normal is normal and is contextual. The ideas of boundless curiousity and being renaissance people appeals to me as a teacher.
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