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How I stay calm, by people with very stressful jobs

How I stay calm, by people with very stressful jobs | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Top tips from an A&E consultant, football manager, headteacher and more
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some pretty interesting points made about leadership.

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 12:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 3:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 4:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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Education Reform Is Awful and Supporters Know It

Education Reform Is Awful and Supporters Know It | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
At the top of many education reformers' wish list is expanding charter schools to give students a choice. The total number of charter schools currently competing with Grosse Pointe and Birmingham public schools is zero....

Via The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Although this has an American slant, Canadians and Albertan should be concerned with School reform often resembling deform. Even when politicians, bureaucrats, and reformers set out to reform little changes. Simply put, the next new fad i.e. digital technologies gets ordered into the classroom with inadequate supports and little input from teachers.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Waiting For the Human Workplace

Waiting For the Human Workplace | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

If more human workplaces are more profitable and companies still don’t build them, there must be a good reason for it. There is a good reason.

 

There are three of them, in fact:

Inertia — it’s a pain in the neck to change thingsBureaucracy — we took the time to write these policies and rules, so we may as well stick with ‘emFear
Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Inertia, bureaucracy, and fear repel transforming Schools into human and humane projects.

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 29, 2:17 PM

We know how to design great products. We know how to untangle customer service snarl-ups. We know how to build supply chains that cover the globe. Surely we’re smart enough to peel the onion on toxic and dysfunctional workplace ideas and practices that suck the life out of organizations and diminish the people inside them, too! All we have to do is begin.


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The hero’s journey through the landscape of the future

The hero’s journey through the landscape of the future | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The forces of the Big Shift are driving both fragmentation and consolidation, fundamentally changing the nature of the relationships among businesses.


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Journey is an interesting word. It comes from the French journee which means day, but is not the day. Instead it signifies the progress during the day, a moment-to-moment process. Alfred North Whitehead called the recurring present holy ground where past and future fused. Being and becoming present, mindful, might be the most important part of the hero's journey. What makes me a better person and the world a better place?

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 29, 3:07 PM

This is a must read publication from Deloitte University Press written by John Hagel III, John Seely Brown, Tamara Samoylova and Duleesha Kulasooriya. 

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Three Lines of Resistance: Ethics, Critical Pedagogy, and Teaching Underground

Three Lines of Resistance: Ethics, Critical Pedagogy, and Teaching Underground | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It is easy for those of us invested in critical pedagogy to see need for major change in education in the U.S. It is also easy for us to write highly ideological manifesti that make sweeping philosophical statements about how things should be.

Via Hybrid Pedagogy, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The challenge of major and substantial organizational structural change is impeded by institutional inertia that many hold on to while saying they want change. Worse yet those who promote themselves as changers often are the most resistant to deep, meaningful change. The key are other lines of resistance. Personal ethics, critical pedagogy, and doing what is necessary underground are part of that solution. Eventually, we need to step up and take it the forefront.

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5 Signs It's Time for You to Change Careers

Many people hate change; contemplating the unknown is scary. So many stick with familiar things even though they no longer fit. This is especially true of careers. Sometimes people get stuck in a career direction or work environment that makes them terribly unhappy, and they stay there because it's tough to change careers once you have gained experience, power, and good compensation.

 

People often end up in the wrong careers by accident. They start out with a job and become proficient, so they advance and make a good living. They may even start a company in that field. They get so focused on growth, meeting objectives, or making the money to support their lifestyle, they don't realize how toxic their life has become.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I left School before any of these became too engrained. I look back in incredible experiences with students and some colleagues with considerable fondness. Other colleagues and bosses less so.

 

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 27, 11:20 PM

Sometimes you just end up following the wrong career path and it takes someone else to objectively point it out. Here are 5 signs you can identify on your own.

Graeme Reid's curator insight, July 28, 3:36 PM

If you recognise these signs then it may be time to consider a career change.

James Cracknell's curator insight, July 29, 1:24 AM

Recognise any of these? - I felt many of them in my career but one that is not mentioned is guilt. Guilt that you are doing a job that many would crave for; guilt that you feel this way at all; guilt that you constantly keep asking that there must be more to life yet how would others that you love feel about a sudden urge to change?

 

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3 Ways to Build Trust for Professional Learning | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights

3 Ways to Build Trust for Professional Learning | LFA: Join The Conversation - Public School Insights | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

National education reports often have difficulty getting attention, but that was not the case when the Gallup polling organization released State of America's Schools. Rather than prescribing technocratic approaches for improving education, the report focused on the "human elements" that drive student achievement. - See more at: http://www.learningfirst.org/3-ways-build-trust-professional-learning#sthash.j3UpTVR6.dpuf


Via Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

One other thing is allow teachers an authentic voice which questions what is done in our schools. After all, they are the closest to the action.

 

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If You Thought I Was Perfect, You Weren't Paying Attention

If You Thought I Was Perfect, You Weren't Paying Attention | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Did you know that great teachers feel slightly disappointed and somewhat unappreciated with a perfect evaluation? Take a look at the following quotes. "I want to be better. Telling me how great the...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is important to link teaching and learning. However, it is important to make sure the relationship which links the two is revealed to the extent it can be. Teaching and learning are phenomenological and hermeneutic spaces and times which can never be fully encountered. Reducing and rendering them to the learning outcomes however is not the way to evaluate.

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Critical Thinking Takes Courage

Critical Thinking Takes Courage | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Critical thinking isn't an entirely natural process; it's one that requires courage.

 

For educators, as a term critical thinking is similar to words like democracy, global, and organic: You hear people use them all the time, but no one seems to understand what they mean.

 

This kind of etymological opacity lends itself to them being misused, fumbled awkwardly, and abused. Over the long term, such abuse empties it of meaning until we all either throw it around casually in the middle of an overly complex sentence to bolster our own credibility, or avoid the term altogether.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed., Marisol Araya Fonseca
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a hermeneutic quality in the article when Terry Heick discusses circling the topic until you understand it a way uniquely yours. Concepts such as critical thinking, democracy, and global are used poorly. Critical thinking is often a way of arriving at the answer in the curriculum. Democracy rarely gets past to tolerating what is different rather than having a conversation and acknowledging difference as important in relationships. After all, critical thinking and democracy challenging the status quo are what living is about.

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 25, 3:42 PM

I am currently teaching metacognitive learning strategies and critical thinking to my undergraduate Business English language learners within an authentic learning experience.  

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Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know...

Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

So here is my list of what I want all new teachers to know:

 

1) - It's Ok to look and feel like this. If being scared wasn't supposed to happen from time to time, then we wouldn't be human. Don't be afraid of what you don't know and aren't sure about. Take everything in stride and accept that you are going to make mistakes. The key is making sure you learn from those mistakes.

2) - Find time during your off period to go observe other classrooms in your building. Even if the content and/or age group are different, there is still a lot you can learn via simple observation. If possible, see if that teacher would be willing to sit and talk with you about what you saw in their classroom. Even better, invite them to observe your classroom and get feedback/input on what they saw in your classroom.

3) - Focus on building relationships with your students from day one. Don't worry about your content at first, you most likely just spent the last four years of your life learning about it. Spend the first few weeks learning about the lives of the students you have in front of you. The more you learn about your students the more they will learn about your content.

4) - Don't worry about discipline and punishing kids; worry about how to provide strong instruction and an engaging classroom environment. This is basically being proactive rather than reactive. A classroom that is engaging with strong instructional practices is a classroom with few discipline problems.

5) - Learn the names and show the utmost respect to every administrative assistant, custodial/maintenance and food service employee in your building. They will help you more than you could ever imagine... trust me on this.

6) - Don't be afraid to speak up and share an idea. You most likely weren't hired because you were the worst candidate, so at some point in time somebody saw something great about you. You bring a new perspective and a fresh set of lenses to the table, so be sure to share your thoughts and insights in a collaborative and collegial manner.

7) - Don't try to do everything on your own. Don't simply shut your door and teach. Work with those who have more experience and know the system. Find a few people whom you can trust, and lean on them.

8) - Be careful of the teacher's lounge and watch out for 'that group.' The teacher's lounge can be the type of environment that just beats you down and makes you feel like the world is a terrible place. This is not always the case, but be aware that these black holes do exist from time to time. Also, every school has 'the group.' You might not notice the group at first because they are always looking for new members (specifically new teachers). Try to avoid this group at all costs.

9) - Having fun on the weekends is all good and is frankly healthy, but be sure to keep your image clean and professional. More employees get in trouble for the silly and not so smart things they do online than for most other reasons. Be safe and have a healthy career/life balance, but don't feel the need to take a picture of every second and then share those pictures with the world.

10) - Get connected and follow the #ntchat hashtag. There is whole world full of resources and information out there, so don't feel limited to just the colleagues in your hallway, in your school and in your district. Reach out and take control of your own learning and development.

What would you add to this list?


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is not just new teachers who benefit from building relationships with students, colleagues, and people outside their work.

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Sharrock's curator insight, July 27, 5:06 PM

Much of this is the same advice I had received many years ago preparing to become a new teacher (in an education program).

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Culturally Responsive Teaching, Part II

Culturally Responsive Teaching, Part II | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

This morning started with a return to the idea of "rings of culture" to let us reflect on our personal biases. A more constructive way to approach the idea of bias is realizing that we all view eve...


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

John Dewey suggested that school was a mingling of cultures. Certainly, there are dominant cultures, but an important aspect of teaching is knowing this and preserving the integrity of what each person brings with them in their learning. This includes the teacher. It is about preserving what is important and healthy and replacing the outdated and outmoded with new healthy contributions.

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Identity, community and trajectories - Jawitz (2009)

Identity, community and trajectories - Jawitz (2009) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The following is a bit of a reaction to one of the readings set for Week 1 of the NGL course. The reading was actually part of the old version of the course and it was brought over into this offeri...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This might be helpful with the dissertation.

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Are You A Civilized Leader?

Are You A Civilized Leader? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As Peter Drucker once said, “Good manners are the lubricating oil of organizations.” Effective leaders of today know that good manners and civility are...

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Having good manners and being civil are essential. An important consideration is how authentic the behaviours are. I told students that sorry was another word in the dictionary unless they made a conscious effort to change problematic behaviours. I found that many of the managers I worked for in School knew the right words, but rarely used them with authenticity. It was about appearance rather than really transforming the self. Those who were authentic reached out to others and helped bridge differences with their work.

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Teacher: 10 Things I Learned Sitting in a Classroom

Teacher: 10 Things I Learned Sitting in a Classroom | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A week of summer PD has left Sarah Cooper inspired but also more thoughtful about how her students experience daily classroom life. Read her 10 takeaways.

Via Mel Riddile, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Sometimes spending time, reflecting on and living what happens in classrooms is necessary. It is not always obvious to us in the midst of teaching. Teaching and learning are relational thus messy, noisy, strange in good ways, etc.

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How the Maker Movement Is Moving into Classrooms

How the Maker Movement Is Moving into Classrooms | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
From the pedagogy of educational theorists and design thinkers to the passion of tinkers and hobbyists, the Maker movement finds its way into mainstream education.

Via Chris Carter, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students love creating and sharing. Not all students fall into that category. When given a choice, most students chose the hands-on projects, but occasionally some chose tests and quizzes. The latter were the anomalies, but they are out there.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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9 Ways to Plan Transformational Lessons: Planning the Best Curriculum Unit Ever

9 Ways to Plan Transformational Lessons: Planning the Best Curriculum Unit Ever | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Transformational lessons don't just happen. They require planning, mindfulness, and a commitment to shift away from educational approaches of the past.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

One that was missing was relationships. That would make ten. Gert Biesta concluded learning is about inputs and outputs. Teaching is relational and invitational. That echoes John Dewey. Teachers do not guarantee learning rather they create invitational and relational spaces and times for students to make their choices about learning. Mary Doll says when we talk about pedagogy it is always talking about something.

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The Need for Principal Renewal: The Promise of Sustaining Principals Through Principal-to-Principal Reflective Practice

The Need for Principal Renewal: The Promise of Sustaining Principals Through Principal-to-Principal Reflective Practice | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

AContent and resources for the education researcher

Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A substantial challenge in principal renewal work is that it does not match the structural changes necessary in School. Reflective practice is all well and fine, but is it deconstructing the work being done. I found it did not when I was still teaching. Quite often, it was just echoes of whatever was being promoted at central office. An important consideration is that principals do not spend the time in the classroom teaching. They are virtual experts and that has to change.

 

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The Troubling Flaws In How We Select Experts

The Troubling Flaws In How We Select Experts | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Organizations are constantly scouring the earth for the talent or perfect expert that will provide the fresh edge and perspective needed to overcome the challenging obstacles that stand in their way to the top. In their pursuit of excellence however, you may be shocked to learn the criteria they use to define credibility and expertise may be severely flawed.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I always wondered how it was done. It certainly does not make much sense in School who is promoted and privileged.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Kenneth Mikkelsen's curator insight, July 28, 7:35 AM

Sadly, it's human nature to overlook the talent nearest you and think an outsider can save the day.  


Why are recommendations perceived as bad ideas when suggested by employees, but suddenly brilliant when a lesser known individual suggests the same thing?


Why are these outsiders perceived to be more credible?

Suvi Salo's curator insight, July 28, 11:32 PM

In the words of Mark Twain, “An expert is an ordinary fellow from another town.”

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Self-directed learning

Self-directed learning | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Stephen D. Brookfield explores the notion of self-directed learning. He takes Knowles' (1975) influential definition as a starting point and then explores some of the problems surrounding the idea....

Via Margaret Driscoll, Learning Organization Librarian, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Self-directed learning has a social quality to it. I like the idea that teaching is about listening. It might be about deep listening and being open when students speak. Self-directed learning can be learned and one role teachers play/perform is creating space and time when students take increasing control of their learning. After all, despite the way we evaluate teachers based on student learning, learning is  students' responsibility. Teachers are there to listen and guide, not do the learning for students. That sounds like it is self-directed.

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Confound it! Correlation is (usually) not causation! But why not? - Less Wrong

Confound it! Correlation is (usually) not causation! But why not? - Less Wrong | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It is widely understood that statistical correlation between two variables ≠ causation. But despite this admonition, people are routinely overconfident in clai
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

They are not the same thing; however it is good to ask this question and remind ourselves that cause and effect can only be seen in retrospect. They do help in predicting what might happen. The key word is might. It cannot be with certainty beyond might.

 

This is why I love articles predicting the Internets future, provide a certain number of habits that lead to success, and use an average to suggest what a teacher should do in classrooms. It is fun to predict, helpful to use certain habits which do not take too seriously, and realize junior high students are able to know sometimes that number does not represent any real classroom and student.

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6 ways to start a speech

6 ways to start a speech | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The opening of your speech needs to be an attention grabber. You want the audience to sit straight in anticipation of what’s coming. A “thank you mr. chairman, I’m delighted to be...

Via Bobby Dillard, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Question, word, statistic, action, quote, and story are great ways to begin a speech and teaching students.

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How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - Edudemic

How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - Edudemic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When we talk about how our education system is failing our students, there are a lot of different options presented on how to ‘fix’ it. Everyone has an answer, a promising new way of thinking, a potential magic bullet. Inevitably, we also examine school systems that are working as a part of investigating what to do …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I rarely assigned homework. It seemed counter-productive and counter-intuitive. The exception, if can be called homework, were projects which engaged students and their parents at home. This provided an untapped resource, excited students and parents, and was highly successful. I always provided more time for these projects so they did not work against learning.

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Sue Osborne's curator insight, July 27, 5:15 PM

Interesting...

Mika Auramo's comment, July 27, 10:00 PM
Too much false information, including topic.
Debra Evans's curator insight, July 28, 2:54 PM

Good piece, but need to consider also; this country is not really catering to multi-cultural group.  But, we should learn from their examples - we in Australia definitely moving towards over-educating, with even prep losing its play-based approach.  Also worth noting - the teacher in the classroom has the biggest impact on whether or not the students will learn - effective teachers=effective learners.

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Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work...

Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on Educación Virtual UNET curated by Jaime Salcedo Luna (A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~...


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Skills, attitudes, and attributes come closest to what students need to learn. The learning that can be taken forward has to be grounded in concrete work being done by students which is meaningful in their immediate lives. Some of the skills on the list are less important than others and gain in importance over time. A key consideration is how to make them relevant in students' immediate work. What do administrative and clerical skills mean to a student?

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A Job Description For Teaching

A Job Description For Teaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A Job Description For Teaching

A rarely discussed weakness in education is the lack of a true job description for teachers in hiring. Being told that “you will teach US History” or “we are hiring you to be a 4th grade teacher” is not a job description. It doesn’t say what you are responsible for causing. It merely describes the content and level you will be teaching. It doesn’t demand that you achieve anything in particular. It only says that a certain slot and set of roles should be filled and certain content should be covered.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most of this article is about inputs (learning outcomes) and outputs (student learning). They are important, however teaching is about having relationships with students and less about having relationships with the learning outcomes. It is a blending of instrumental work and communicative work.

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Ed Tech Promoters Need to Realize We’re Not All Autodidacts ~ Slate

Ed Tech Promoters Need to Realize We’re Not All Autodidacts ~ Slate | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

by Annie Murphy Paul

 

"This is a very particular take on learning: the autodidact’s take. We shouldn’t mistake it for most people’s reality. Productive learning without guidance and support from others is rare. A pair of eminent researchers has gone so far as to call the very notion of self-directed learning “an urban legend in education.”

 

"In a paper published in Educational Psychologist last year, Paul A. Kirschner of the Open University of the Netherlands and Jeroen J.G. van Merriënboer of Maastricht University challenge the popular assumption “that it is the learner who knows best and that she or he should be the controlling force in her or his learning.”


Via Jim Lerman, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Very few people are true autodidacts. Even Bill Gates had mentors i.e. Warren Buffet. We should encourage self-directed learning, but realize it requires teaching and pedagogy.

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How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space

How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from Thinking Through Project-Based Learning: Guiding Deeper Inquiry by Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss. It was published this month by Corwin. Take a moment a...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Interacting with one another is essential in learning and problem-based learning. Creating spaces where this happens naturally is important and echoes the work John Dewey suggested was critical in teaching.

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