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Five Ways Leaders Help Others Belong, Not Just Fit In

Five Ways Leaders Help Others Belong, Not Just Fit In | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
There's a big difference between fitting in and belonging. In fact, fitting in can be one of the biggest barriers to belonging, says researcher and author Brené Brown. Fitting in is about assessing...

Via Anne Leong, John Michel
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
Belonging is something we all seek. It makes us feel at home when we have a sense of belonging. Take a moment and greet each child as they walk in the room. Do this in a genuine way and the rewards are incredible.
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John Michel's curator insight, January 13, 8:55 AM

Helping people find a sense of belonging leads to them being fully engaged and committed to their work and the organization. It causes people to tap into their discretionary energy to accomplish the goals of the organization versus settling for just fitting in and doing the minimum to get by.

Don Cloud's curator insight, January 25, 10:21 AM

Interesting and powerful ... something to consider -- what is the link between leaders creating a sense of "belonging" and leaders setting the conditions for empowering their people?

Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 12:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 3:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 4:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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3C's to Supporting Student Success

3C's to Supporting Student Success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Care, captivate, and catapult: these are Katie Jacobs' daily practices to help her second graders become the best students and people they can possibly be.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I can think of other words i.e. compassion, confidence, community, etc. Captivate is important and moving forward is essential. When we stop moving we stop learning.

 

One struggle is with the desire to measure success. Is it always necessary. Sometimes being captivated and catapulted forward might be enough.

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A Self-Directed Learning Model For 21st Century Learners

A Self-Directed Learning Model For 21st Century Learners | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The goal of the model isn’t content knowledge (though it should produce that), but rather something closer to wisdom–learning how to learn, understanding what’s worth understanding, and perhaps most importantly, analyzing the purpose of learning (e.g., personal and social change). It also encourages the student to examine the relationship between study and work–an authentic “need to know” with important abstractions like citizenship and legacy.

 

It is therefore built around the central concept of self-knowledge–better understanding one’s self, and using work and study to inform one’s interactions with the world. It sounds very hippie, we know, but that’s part of the reason it exists–to offer an alternative to standards and content-focused and institutionally-centered “delivery” of information.


Via Patric Lougheed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Self-directed learning is important, however it happens with teachers working with students. Learning will continue to be relational and social. The key to self-directed learning will be that students take an increasing role in deciding what learning is important in their lives and working with their interests.

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Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey?

Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings July 25, 2014 Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey? “If I want to justify my existence, and continue to be obsessed with the notion that I’ve got to do something f...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Too often, we allow ignorance to justify certain behaviours. It blinds us to the humanity we owe each other. It is not that we come into the world knowing everything. Instead, it is about being open to seeing each other as humans. Education provides those opportunities.

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Learning to Read Does Not End in Fourth Grade

Learning to Read Does Not End in Fourth Grade | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Word-processing skills develop even past fifth grade

 

A new study published in the journal Developmental Science questions that assumption, showing that children are still learning to read past fourth and even fifth grade.

 

The shift to automatic word-processing, in which the brain recognizes whether a group of symbols constitutes a word within milliseconds, allowing fluid reading that helps the reader focus on the content of the text rather than on the words, may occur later than previously thought.

 


Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It might be that learning reading is a life-long learning and becomes more automatic as we practice, but readers never stop learning.

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 24, 12:03 PM

"So if fourth-graders aren’t quite reading to learn, then when does the shift toward more complete automatic word-processing occur? According to Coch, that probably happens some time between fifth grade and college—a period she says that hasn’t been studied.


For now, the results strongly suggest that reading skills need to continue to be nurtured during that period. “


This certainly does suggest that teachers beyond fourth grade are still teachers of reading,” says Coch.

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Chapter 2. The nature of knowledge and the implications for teaching | Teaching in a Digital Age

Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I read some of the work I have done on my dissertation today. A key question emerging in the writing process is "What knowledge is important?" This is not a question we ask the whole group only, but one that is asked of each person. We make sense of what we learn based on what is important. Our personal life-stories and collective-stories mingle and form around the question about what is important.

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leading and learning: Edutopia - a great site( established by George Lucas) for creative teachers

leading and learning: Edutopia - a great site( established by George Lucas) for creative teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is not just traditional education, whatever that is, that can be isolating. Many of the reforms are also isolating. Teaching and learning are relational and social. When we isolate, we deny the human spirit which thrives in healthy relationships.

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OECD Report - Measuring Innovation in Education (Ontario data and World - country data)

OECD Report - Measuring Innovation in Education (Ontario data and World - country data) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Data and research on education including skills, literacy, research, elementary schools, childhood learning, vocational training and PISA, PIACC and TALIS surveys., This report explores the association between school innovation and different measures related to educational objectives. This book is the beginning of a new journey: it calls for innovations in the field of measurement – and not just of education.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Quran Coaching
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The study uses business metrics in evaluating educational innovation. This might be OK for some, however I do not see education as a business and think it is inappropriate to measure it as such. What has happened is that education has devolved into a prefabricated process of inputs and outputs called School using Technique.

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Les Howard's curator insight, July 23, 6:34 AM

Very interesting publication.  Link to read it for free. Can click on individual country innovations.

Quran Coaching's curator insight, July 23, 8:49 AM

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How Evolved Is Your Leadership Style?

How Evolved Is Your Leadership Style? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Leadership influences behavior. Effective leadership creates positive change by inspiring and motivating. It creates an environment where colleagues love their work and strive to perform at their

Via Maria Lopez Alvarado, MBA, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leading is about power and how it flows. When we are conduits and let power flow through us, it works and allows others to take responsibility. It is not so much about giving them responsibly and about creating environments where responsibility is taken.

 

I compare it to teaching and learning. I cannot learn for students. They take responsibility for their learning. It does not mean I shirk responsibility in my teaching, rather I use it differently than the expert at the front of the class, with lights down, allowing children to do worksheets projected onto a screen while he checks a Twitter feed.

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Formative Assessment: The Secret Sauce of Blended Success

Formative Assessment:  The Secret Sauce of Blended Success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Although most people probably associate the term “assessment” with quizzes and exams, in reality these high-stakes activities represent a small subset of assessment opportunities. Educationally, assessments can be broken into two larger categories: summative and formative. Most of our experience with assessment usually comes in the form of summative assessment. We have our students take exams or write papers at the end of a chapter. Summative assessments are valuable because they let us know whether our students have successfully learned what we wanted them to learn. Summative assessments, however, are limited in that they provide little information to guide teaching because they usually serve as the endpoint of some instruction.

 

"Whereas summative assessments are assessments “of” learning, formative assessments are assessments “for” learning. They help to guide instruction and provide valuable information for the instructor and for the learner. Formative assessments can help to drive instructional decision-making and allow the instructor to “take the temperature” of the class. In the discussion with my colleague, I outlined the different phases of blended learning and highlighted opportunities for formative assessment in each."

 

- See more at: http://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/educational-assessment/formative-assessment-secret-sauce-blended-success/?ET=facultyfocus:e80:154484a:&st=email#sthash.L5dbSYEK.dpuf

Via Patric Lougheed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is also a feature called assessment-as-learning which is an ongoing self-regulating process undertaken by teachers and students. The three features of assessment, summative, formative, and self-regulating, each play important roles. The challenge is that the first two are after-the-learning and need a complementary piece that students learn to use in their learning on an ongoing basis.

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Art Works: Integrating Creativity in the Curriculum

At Boston Arts Academy, high student achievement is driven by infusing the rigorous college-prep program with visual arts, dance, theater and music.

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I was always amazed how focused students were when they worked aesthetically. There was a fusion of quiet and noise that made its own sounds, a buzzing and helping one another.

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Project-Based Learning Through a Maker's Lens - Edutopia

Project-Based Learning Through a Maker's Lens - Edutopia | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"The rise of the Maker has been one of the most exciting educational trends of the past few years. A Maker is an individual who communicates, collaborates, tinkers, fixes, breaks, rebuilds, and constructs projects for the world around him or her. A Maker, re-cast into a classroom, has a name that we all love: a learner. A Maker, just like a true learner, values the process of making as much as the product. In the classroom, the act of Making is an avenue for a teacher to unlock the learning potential of her or his students in a way that represents many of the best practices of educational pedagogy. A Makerspace classroom has the potential to create life-long learners through exciting, real-world projects."


Via John Evans, Alfredo Corell
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This sounds remarkably similar to John Dewey who used the word reconstructing in describing real-world, concrete learning that can happen. This takes exceptional pedagogy and teaching in building  relationships with students.

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ManufacturingStories's curator insight, July 12, 6:18 AM

The Maker Movement will be a huge benefit to career preparedness in education through the implementation of Maker Clubs in K-12 and Maker Classes.  MakerSpaces in communities will serve to connect artisans of all types to education and industry.  For more on this "disruptive" movement check out this blog posting and related links. http://bit.ly/1me7ziK

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, July 23, 11:31 AM

Teachers new to PBL and Making often make similar mistakes:

  • Choosing projects too large for their comfort level and resources
  • Focusing on the outcome, not the process of Making
  • Thinking the educator must have the answer
june holley's curator insight, July 24, 4:29 AM

Maker activities are great examples of self-organizing and we can learn a lot from how Maker Movement organizes space to support people's self-organizing.

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Let ‘Em Out! The Many Benefits of Outdoor Play In Kindergarten - Mind/Shift

Let ‘Em Out! The Many Benefits of Outdoor Play In Kindergarten - Mind/Shift | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"For the typical American kindergartner, unstructured free play during the school day consists of 20 to 30 minutes of recess, and perhaps some time at indoor “stations” — perhaps creating with building blocks, costumes, or musical instruments. But what if there was more? What if the answer to “what did you do in school today?” was, “I climbed a tree, played in the mud, built a fire”? That is exactly the kind of learning going on in the Swiss Waldkindergartens, or forest kindergartens, where children ages four to seven spend all of their school days playing outdoors, no matter the weather. With no explicit math or literacy taught until first grade, the Swiss have no set goals for kindergartners beyond a few measurements, like using scissors and writing one’s own name. They instead have chosen to focus on the social interaction and emotional well-being found in free play."


Via John Evans, simondcollins
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The kindergarten model is too quickly dispensed of and might work well in the learning of older students and adults.

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Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’

Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Vanderbilt University

 

"Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.  More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner.

 

Metacognitive practices increase students’ abilities to transfer or adapt their learning to new contexts and tasks."


Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Riley Klages, Les Howard, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Emotional intelligence and learning how to learn might be the two most important teaching work we do for children. It is about connecting with what is important in healthy ways and understanding learning more completely. We can never do this completely, but we should make the effort.

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, Today, 6:13 AM

Four assignments for explicit instruction:


  1. Preassessments—Encouraging Students to Examine Their Current Thinking
  2. The Muddiest Point—Giving Students Practice in Identifying Confusions
  3. Retrospective Postassessments—Pushing Students to Recognize Conceptual Change
  4. Reflective Journals—Providing a Forum in Which Students Monitor Their Own Thinking

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25 Alternatives to Using the Word “Great”

25 Alternatives to Using the Word “Great” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Look at this list of phrases. You won't just see replacements for the word “great,” you'll see catalysts. These are reminders of what you can look for in the

Via Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The word that fits with great is amazing. I read some blogs where those two words are the only way of qualifying a noun.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, Today, 1:09 PM

this is great food for thought. 'Great" as a response almost says nothing when specifics or thoughts about why are so much better. It is similar to students saying they will try to improve by "Working harder' or 'studying." unless they can clarify specifically what that means to them, the improvement and deep thinking about it will never occur.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, Today, 1:11 PM

This is great food for thought. 'Great" as a response almost says nothing when specifics or thoughts about the :"why "are so much better and clearer.. It is similar to students saying they will try to improve by "Working harder' or 'studying." Unless they can clarify specifically what that means to them, the improvement and deep thinking about it will never occur.

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Interdisciplinary Literacy - Science

The Science Interdisciplinary Science Presentation for EMWP - Julie King, Lauren Luedtke, Jeff Taylor, Doug Baker and Julie Blomquist.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am reading David Smith's book Pedagon. He proposes a literacy challenge is we are speeding at such a pace we cannot take time and become literate in the learning we undertake. To be literate is to go deep below the superficial levels and spend time being subjected to the subjects we love.

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Word to the Wise: 10 Tips for First-Year Principals

Word to the Wise: 10 Tips for First-Year Principals | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By the time they step into the position, most principals have already spent years—even decades—in the classroom as teachers. This experience certainly comes in handy, but rarely is it enough…

Via Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The point about principals seeming to forget about their classroom experiences is what I saw with many principals, first year and beyond, particularly towards the end of my teaching. It coincided with their desire to create an imprint of a few of their favourite things i.e. digital technologies, 7 Habits, organize complementary courses, etc.

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Speculative Diction | By the numbers | University Affairs

Speculative Diction | By the numbers | University Affairs | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By the numbers
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching, learning, writing are political work. Political work suggests there is an engagement with a polis or community. It might be small, but we engage someone in that work.

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Education Readings July 25th

Education Readings July 25th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allan.alach@ihug.co.nz. This week’s homework! Is Education as We Know it On its Way Out? Your thoughts? “...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The link that caught my eye was the one about Leonard Cohen. I have listened to his music since the late 1960's. He is a wonderfully creative poet and performer. I liked his comment about creativity being a search for self-respect. When we create, we feel good about the person we are.

 

The other links look great, as well.

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Principals in U.S. Are More Likely to Consider Their Students Poor

Principals in U.S. Are More Likely to Consider Their Students Poor | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Perceptions of disadvantage may play role as American students from low-income families struggle more than counterparts in many other nations.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we use language which is diagnostic and based on learning being a place of deficiency, this is not just directed at those who live in poverty. It manifests itself most clearly there, but permeates School and its language.

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Ken Robinson rebuttal

Ken Robinson rebuttal | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Thanks to Scott Goodman, who sent me this essay analyzing Sir Ken's presentation on TED in response to my own piece on Sir Ken Robinson. Scott's analysis focuses more than mine on on Sir Ken's tech...

Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I do have some issues with Sir Ken Robinson's views. For the most part, I have never considered them as an attack on classroom teachers. I see them as a justifiable criticism of a system that needs to be transformed. Quite often, his work is taken as a view that anything goes and I am not sure that is what he is suggesting. As well, I don't think he is saying the classroom teacher should be done away with. Here is where I think he does not go far enough. As a former classroom teacher, he might want to take the initiative and point out that many teachers are oppressed and provide ways for them to overcome an oppressive system which marginalizes their important and political work.

 

I found his work was often used to justify the widespread and thoughtless use of digital technologies and social media in  classrooms. With more clarification and a stand against the technocrats, bureaucrats, and so-called experts outside the classroom, Sir Ken would go a long ways towards helping improve the lot of teachers and students alike. He seems to not realize, and this is not unique to him, that many of the decision-makers are people who have not been in classrooms for decades, a sorry lot who sped through the classroom to tell us what they do not know, and others who have never been in the classroom.

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Why Employees Resist Change

Why Employees Resist Change | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
These are a few initial responses you may experience when you announce an organizational change to employees. You will be better able to change employees' attitudes and turn their resistance into cooperation, once you understand why some are resisting change.

Via Anne Leong, The Rice Process
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When people resist, we see that as problematic. In fact, it might be just what we need at times and maybe a lot of the time. Resisting, questioning, and challenging should be part of the conversation. I experienced a lot of compliance and conformity in School where someone external to my classroom often set the goals for my classroom. It was very unpopular when I spoke up and questioned, resisted, and challenged.

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12 New Yorker education articles to read while the archives are free ~ Vox

12 New Yorker education articles to read while the archives are free ~ Vox | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

from the website

via EdSurge

 

"The New Yorker has made its archives since 2007 (and a few articles from before that) free for the next three months. That includes some great journalism on education — a tour of the biggest debates in K-12 and higher education.

 

"If you need something to read on your next flight, want a break from beach reading, or are aiming for a better grasp of the American education system before the kids go back to school this fall… here's your summer reading syllabus."

 


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are interesting titles and summaries listed.

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Are you raising nice kids? A Harvard psychologist gives 5 ways to raise them to be kind

Are you raising nice kids? A Harvard psychologist gives 5 ways to raise them to be kind | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think your kids are being raised to be kind? Think again. A Harvard researcher and psychologist has 5 ways to train your child to be kind and empathetic.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It would seem raising children and teaching children to be kind is important in the world today.

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Teaching Metacognition

Teaching Metacognition | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This webpage is a summary, written by Carol Ormand, of Marsha Lovett's presentation at the 2008 Educause Learning Initiative conference. Dr. Lovett's slides and a podcast of her presentation can be ...

Via Chris Carter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The key is self-regulating one's learning, a mindfulness of what is happening and adjusting as needs appear and they will. It would seem that meta-cognition, learning about learning, would be vital in the 21st Century and yet we do little in that area.

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Chris Carter's curator insight, July 23, 11:40 AM

Reflection and structure are so important here!

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How to Read Education Data Without Jumping to Conclusions - The Atlantic

How to Read Education Data Without Jumping to Conclusions - The Atlantic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How to Read Education Data Without Jumping to Conclusions
The Atlantic
Their coverage of education research therefore could inspire parents and policymakers to bring half-formed ideas into classroom.

Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

An abstract does not research conclusions make. It takes time to read through and grasp the context and findings in any study. We do bring half-baked ideas into our classrooms and it is not just the parents and policymakers who are involved. Teachers, administrators, central office staff, and those doing research are often guilty, as well.

 

A key to good use of research and data is to see what works in the particular setting we work in. This is like doing our own research. The word comes from the French meaning to search again suggesting it is an iterative process and not a one-time event.

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