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Classroom Practice - 10 commandments of successful innovation - news - TES

Classroom Practice - 10 commandments of successful innovation - news - TES | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Teachers love to experiment, but too many interventions spoil a lesson. Follow our tips to make the most of your bright ideas

Via Barbara Bray, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Theory and practice integrated is a fascinating idea which is under utilized.

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Barbara Bray's curator insight, January 10, 10:34 AM

Here are 10 commandments that focus on learners first. TES magazine's article by David Weston is written in an interesting way. Starting with the learners and not reinventing the wheels are both good advice for teachers who have so much on their plates. The author brings in ideas like doing your research on why something works before experimenting with your kids. It is okay to take risks and the author is right about prioritizing your ideas. Spend the time to research, collaborate with other teachers to see what worked and what you need to do different next time. Interesting read!

Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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Critical Thinking Takes Courage

Critical Thinking Takes Courage | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Critical thinking isn't an entirely natural process; it's one that requires courage.

 

For educators, as a term critical thinking is similar to words like democracy, global, and organic: You hear people use them all the time, but no one seems to understand what they mean.

 

This kind of etymological opacity lends itself to them being misused, fumbled awkwardly, and abused. Over the long term, such abuse empties it of meaning until we all either throw it around casually in the middle of an overly complex sentence to bolster our own credibility, or avoid the term altogether.


Via Rob Hatfield, M.Ed., Marisol Araya Fonseca
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is a hermeneutic quality in the article when Terry Heick discusses circling the topic until you understand it a way uniquely yours. Concepts such as critical thinking, democracy, and global are used poorly. Critical thinking is often a way of arriving at the answer in the curriculum. Democracy rarely gets past to tolerating what is different rather than having a conversation and acknowledging difference as important in relationships. After all, critical thinking and democracy challenging the status quo are what living is about.

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Rob Hatfield, M.Ed.'s curator insight, June 25, 6:42 PM

I am currently teaching metacognitive learning strategies and critical thinking to my undergraduate Business English language learners within an authentic learning experience.  

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Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know...

Life of an Educator: 10 things I want all new teachers to know... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

So here is my list of what I want all new teachers to know:

 

1) - It's Ok to look and feel like this. If being scared wasn't supposed to happen from time to time, then we wouldn't be human. Don't be afraid of what you don't know and aren't sure about. Take everything in stride and accept that you are going to make mistakes. The key is making sure you learn from those mistakes.

2) - Find time during your off period to go observe other classrooms in your building. Even if the content and/or age group are different, there is still a lot you can learn via simple observation. If possible, see if that teacher would be willing to sit and talk with you about what you saw in their classroom. Even better, invite them to observe your classroom and get feedback/input on what they saw in your classroom.

3) - Focus on building relationships with your students from day one. Don't worry about your content at first, you most likely just spent the last four years of your life learning about it. Spend the first few weeks learning about the lives of the students you have in front of you. The more you learn about your students the more they will learn about your content.

4) - Don't worry about discipline and punishing kids; worry about how to provide strong instruction and an engaging classroom environment. This is basically being proactive rather than reactive. A classroom that is engaging with strong instructional practices is a classroom with few discipline problems.

5) - Learn the names and show the utmost respect to every administrative assistant, custodial/maintenance and food service employee in your building. They will help you more than you could ever imagine... trust me on this.

6) - Don't be afraid to speak up and share an idea. You most likely weren't hired because you were the worst candidate, so at some point in time somebody saw something great about you. You bring a new perspective and a fresh set of lenses to the table, so be sure to share your thoughts and insights in a collaborative and collegial manner.

7) - Don't try to do everything on your own. Don't simply shut your door and teach. Work with those who have more experience and know the system. Find a few people whom you can trust, and lean on them.

8) - Be careful of the teacher's lounge and watch out for 'that group.' The teacher's lounge can be the type of environment that just beats you down and makes you feel like the world is a terrible place. This is not always the case, but be aware that these black holes do exist from time to time. Also, every school has 'the group.' You might not notice the group at first because they are always looking for new members (specifically new teachers). Try to avoid this group at all costs.

9) - Having fun on the weekends is all good and is frankly healthy, but be sure to keep your image clean and professional. More employees get in trouble for the silly and not so smart things they do online than for most other reasons. Be safe and have a healthy career/life balance, but don't feel the need to take a picture of every second and then share those pictures with the world.

10) - Get connected and follow the #ntchat hashtag. There is whole world full of resources and information out there, so don't feel limited to just the colleagues in your hallway, in your school and in your district. Reach out and take control of your own learning and development.

What would you add to this list?


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is not just new teachers who benefit from building relationships with students, colleagues, and people outside their work.

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Sharrock's curator insight, July 27, 8:06 PM

Much of this is the same advice I had received many years ago preparing to become a new teacher (in an education program).

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Culturally Responsive Teaching, Part II

Culturally Responsive Teaching, Part II | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

This morning started with a return to the idea of "rings of culture" to let us reflect on our personal biases. A more constructive way to approach the idea of bias is realizing that we all view eve...


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

John Dewey suggested that school was a mingling of cultures. Certainly, there are dominant cultures, but an important aspect of teaching is knowing this and preserving the integrity of what each person brings with them in their learning. This includes the teacher. It is about preserving what is important and healthy and replacing the outdated and outmoded with new healthy contributions.

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Identity, community and trajectories - Jawitz (2009)

Identity, community and trajectories - Jawitz (2009) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The following is a bit of a reaction to one of the readings set for Week 1 of the NGL course. The reading was actually part of the old version of the course and it was brought over into this offeri...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This might be helpful with the dissertation.

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Are You A Civilized Leader?

Are You A Civilized Leader? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As Peter Drucker once said, “Good manners are the lubricating oil of organizations.” Effective leaders of today know that good manners and civility are...

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Having good manners and being civil are essential. An important consideration is how authentic the behaviours are. I told students that sorry was another word in the dictionary unless they made a conscious effort to change problematic behaviours. I found that many of the managers I worked for in School knew the right words, but rarely used them with authenticity. It was about appearance rather than really transforming the self. Those who were authentic reached out to others and helped bridge differences with their work.

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Habits for Success in School and Life

Habits for Success in School and Life | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Take a moment to join us in a snapshot of a classroom we recently observed: Students are hard at work designing a travel brochure as a part of their study of Ireland. They need to think about how m...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I used these habits in my classrooms almost 20 years ago. They are excellent and students play a substantial role in their learning.

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colleen demille's curator insight, July 26, 5:14 PM

Cultivating a growth mindset is key!

Cynthia Day's curator insight, July 27, 11:21 AM

Cameras

Ideas

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Rethinking Rookies: Why Are More New Teachers Quitting Early? - Education Writers Association

Rethinking Rookies: Why Are More New Teachers Quitting Early? - Education Writers Association | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
For decades teaching was considered a stable profession, with many individuals spending their entire careers at the front of ...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Without the emotional and physical support that all teachers require, it is likely the trend will continue. There are other factors which are sometimes overlooked i.e. do all education school grads enter classrooms, what demographic impacts accelerate leaving the profession and stabilize it, etc? Another consideration is the use of part-time contracts. This seems to have become more prevalent in Alberta where I taught. If you cannot live, do you you stay? I think we have seen some pretty oppressive tactics used by School managers and politicians on the business side of School which seems to override the education of children. What is unfortunate is many School managers think of themselves as teachers, but they have left the classroom, as well, in many cases.

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3C's to Supporting Student Success

3C's to Supporting Student Success | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Care, captivate, and catapult: these are Katie Jacobs' daily practices to help her second graders become the best students and people they can possibly be.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I can think of other words i.e. compassion, confidence, community, etc. Captivate is important and moving forward is essential. When we stop moving we stop learning.

 

One struggle is with the desire to measure success. Is it always necessary. Sometimes being captivated and catapulted forward might be enough.

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A Self-Directed Learning Model For 21st Century Learners

A Self-Directed Learning Model For 21st Century Learners | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The goal of the model isn’t content knowledge (though it should produce that), but rather something closer to wisdom–learning how to learn, understanding what’s worth understanding, and perhaps most importantly, analyzing the purpose of learning (e.g., personal and social change). It also encourages the student to examine the relationship between study and work–an authentic “need to know” with important abstractions like citizenship and legacy.

 

It is therefore built around the central concept of self-knowledge–better understanding one’s self, and using work and study to inform one’s interactions with the world. It sounds very hippie, we know, but that’s part of the reason it exists–to offer an alternative to standards and content-focused and institutionally-centered “delivery” of information.


Via Patric Lougheed
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Self-directed learning is important, however it happens with teachers working with students. Learning will continue to be relational and social. The key to self-directed learning will be that students take an increasing role in deciding what learning is important in their lives and working with their interests.

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Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey?

Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings July 25, 2014 Should we even consider ignorance a part of the journey? “If I want to justify my existence, and continue to be obsessed with the notion that I’ve got to do something f...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Too often, we allow ignorance to justify certain behaviours. It blinds us to the humanity we owe each other. It is not that we come into the world knowing everything. Instead, it is about being open to seeing each other as humans. Education provides those opportunities.

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Learning to Read Does Not End in Fourth Grade

Learning to Read Does Not End in Fourth Grade | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Word-processing skills develop even past fifth grade

 

A new study published in the journal Developmental Science questions that assumption, showing that children are still learning to read past fourth and even fifth grade.

 

The shift to automatic word-processing, in which the brain recognizes whether a group of symbols constitutes a word within milliseconds, allowing fluid reading that helps the reader focus on the content of the text rather than on the words, may occur later than previously thought.

 


Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Riley Klages
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It might be that learning reading is a life-long learning and becomes more automatic as we practice, but readers never stop learning.

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 24, 3:03 PM

"So if fourth-graders aren’t quite reading to learn, then when does the shift toward more complete automatic word-processing occur? According to Coch, that probably happens some time between fifth grade and college—a period she says that hasn’t been studied.


For now, the results strongly suggest that reading skills need to continue to be nurtured during that period. “


This certainly does suggest that teachers beyond fourth grade are still teachers of reading,” says Coch.

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Chapter 2. The nature of knowledge and the implications for teaching | Teaching in a Digital Age

Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I read some of the work I have done on my dissertation today. A key question emerging in the writing process is "What knowledge is important?" This is not a question we ask the whole group only, but one that is asked of each person. We make sense of what we learn based on what is important. Our personal life-stories and collective-stories mingle and form around the question about what is important.

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6 ways to start a speech

6 ways to start a speech | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The opening of your speech needs to be an attention grabber. You want the audience to sit straight in anticipation of what’s coming. A “thank you mr. chairman, I’m delighted to be...

Via Bobby Dillard, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Question, word, statistic, action, quote, and story are great ways to begin a speech and teaching students.

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How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - Edudemic

How Homework Works In Finland (Hint: There Isn't Any) - Edudemic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When we talk about how our education system is failing our students, there are a lot of different options presented on how to ‘fix’ it. Everyone has an answer, a promising new way of thinking, a potential magic bullet. Inevitably, we also examine school systems that are working as a part of investigating what to do …

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I rarely assigned homework. It seemed counter-productive and counter-intuitive. The exception, if can be called homework, were projects which engaged students and their parents at home. This provided an untapped resource, excited students and parents, and was highly successful. I always provided more time for these projects so they did not work against learning.

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Sue Osborne's curator insight, July 27, 8:15 PM

Interesting...

Mika Auramo's comment, Today, 1:00 AM
Too much false information, including topic.
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Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work...

Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work... | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning on Educación Virtual UNET curated by Jaime Salcedo Luna (A Comprehensive Checklist of The 21st Century Learning and Work Skills ~...


Via Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Skills, attitudes, and attributes come closest to what students need to learn. The learning that can be taken forward has to be grounded in concrete work being done by students which is meaningful in their immediate lives. Some of the skills on the list are less important than others and gain in importance over time. A key consideration is how to make them relevant in students' immediate work. What do administrative and clerical skills mean to a student?

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A Job Description For Teaching

A Job Description For Teaching | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A Job Description For Teaching

A rarely discussed weakness in education is the lack of a true job description for teachers in hiring. Being told that “you will teach US History” or “we are hiring you to be a 4th grade teacher” is not a job description. It doesn’t say what you are responsible for causing. It merely describes the content and level you will be teaching. It doesn’t demand that you achieve anything in particular. It only says that a certain slot and set of roles should be filled and certain content should be covered.

 


Via Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most of this article is about inputs (learning outcomes) and outputs (student learning). They are important, however teaching is about having relationships with students and less about having relationships with the learning outcomes. It is a blending of instrumental work and communicative work.

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Ed Tech Promoters Need to Realize We’re Not All Autodidacts ~ Slate

Ed Tech Promoters Need to Realize We’re Not All Autodidacts ~ Slate | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

by Annie Murphy Paul

 

"This is a very particular take on learning: the autodidact’s take. We shouldn’t mistake it for most people’s reality. Productive learning without guidance and support from others is rare. A pair of eminent researchers has gone so far as to call the very notion of self-directed learning “an urban legend in education.”

 

"In a paper published in Educational Psychologist last year, Paul A. Kirschner of the Open University of the Netherlands and Jeroen J.G. van Merriënboer of Maastricht University challenge the popular assumption “that it is the learner who knows best and that she or he should be the controlling force in her or his learning.”


Via Jim Lerman, Bonnie Bracey Sutton
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Very few people are true autodidacts. Even Bill Gates had mentors i.e. Warren Buffet. We should encourage self-directed learning, but realize it requires teaching and pedagogy.

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How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space

How to Make Your Classroom a Thinking Space | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Editor's note: The following is an excerpt from Thinking Through Project-Based Learning: Guiding Deeper Inquiry by Jane Krauss and Suzie Boss. It was published this month by Corwin. Take a moment a...

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Interacting with one another is essential in learning and problem-based learning. Creating spaces where this happens naturally is important and echoes the work John Dewey suggested was critical in teaching.

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Can Creativity be Taught? Results from research studies

Can Creativity be Taught? Results from research studies | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If creativity can be taught, how is it done? Results from studies on creativity by George Land, Teresa Amabile and IBM.

Via Wellenwide
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure that creativity can be taught. That does not mean it cannot be encouraged just as readily as it can be inhibited. Do we really teach non-creativity? Do we put up barriers to creative behaviours? John Dewey suggested the role of teachers was to create an environment where learning could happen. He did not mean this as a lock-step, one-size-fits-all process, but as one where the spaces were inviting and students participated in their learning. Little has changed in School since the study cited, but to put up more barriers to creativity.

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Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’

Metacognition: ask, not only ‘What are you learning?’ but ‘How are you learning?’ | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Vanderbilt University

 

"Metacognition is, put simply, thinking about one’s thinking.  More precisely, it refers to the processes used to plan, monitor, and assess one’s understanding and performance. Metacognition includes a critical awareness of a) one’s thinking and learning and b) oneself as a thinker and learner.

 

Metacognitive practices increase students’ abilities to transfer or adapt their learning to new contexts and tasks."


Via Mel Riddile, Cindy Riley Klages, Les Howard, Luciana Viter
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Emotional intelligence and learning how to learn might be the two most important teaching work we do for children. It is about connecting with what is important in healthy ways and understanding learning more completely. We can never do this completely, but we should make the effort.

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Mel Riddile's curator insight, July 25, 9:13 AM

Four assignments for explicit instruction:


  1. Preassessments—Encouraging Students to Examine Their Current Thinking
  2. The Muddiest Point—Giving Students Practice in Identifying Confusions
  3. Retrospective Postassessments—Pushing Students to Recognize Conceptual Change
  4. Reflective Journals—Providing a Forum in Which Students Monitor Their Own Thinking

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25 Alternatives to Using the Word “Great”

25 Alternatives to Using the Word “Great” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Look at this list of phrases. You won't just see replacements for the word “great,” you'll see catalysts. These are reminders of what you can look for in the

Via Nancy Jones
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The word that fits with great is amazing. I read some blogs where those two words are the only way of qualifying a noun.

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Nancy Jones's curator insight, July 25, 4:09 PM

this is great food for thought. 'Great" as a response almost says nothing when specifics or thoughts about why are so much better. It is similar to students saying they will try to improve by "Working harder' or 'studying." unless they can clarify specifically what that means to them, the improvement and deep thinking about it will never occur.

Nancy Jones's curator insight, July 25, 4:11 PM

This is great food for thought. 'Great" as a response almost says nothing when specifics or thoughts about the :"why "are so much better and clearer.. It is similar to students saying they will try to improve by "Working harder' or 'studying." Unless they can clarify specifically what that means to them, the improvement and deep thinking about it will never occur.

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Interdisciplinary Literacy - Science

The Science Interdisciplinary Science Presentation for EMWP - Julie King, Lauren Luedtke, Jeff Taylor, Doug Baker and Julie Blomquist.

Via Lynnette Van Dyke, Sharrock
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am reading David Smith's book Pedagon. He proposes a literacy challenge is we are speeding at such a pace we cannot take time and become literate in the learning we undertake. To be literate is to go deep below the superficial levels and spend time being subjected to the subjects we love.

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Word to the Wise: 10 Tips for First-Year Principals

Word to the Wise: 10 Tips for First-Year Principals | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By the time they step into the position, most principals have already spent years—even decades—in the classroom as teachers. This experience certainly comes in handy, but rarely is it enough…

Via Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The point about principals seeming to forget about their classroom experiences is what I saw with many principals, first year and beyond, particularly towards the end of my teaching. It coincided with their desire to create an imprint of a few of their favourite things i.e. digital technologies, 7 Habits, organize complementary courses, etc.

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Speculative Diction | By the numbers | University Affairs

Speculative Diction | By the numbers | University Affairs | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By the numbers
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching, learning, writing are political work. Political work suggests there is an engagement with a polis or community. It might be small, but we engage someone in that work.

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Education Readings July 25th

Education Readings July 25th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allan.alach@ihug.co.nz. This week’s homework! Is Education as We Know it On its Way Out? Your thoughts? “...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The link that caught my eye was the one about Leonard Cohen. I have listened to his music since the late 1960's. He is a wonderfully creative poet and performer. I liked his comment about creativity being a search for self-respect. When we create, we feel good about the person we are.

 

The other links look great, as well.

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