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Developing leaders: It's your job

It’s not part of your job description. Nobody has told you that you need to spend time and effort developing others in your organization. You have too many

Via Anne Leong, buket
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is. This is servant-leadership

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Andrew Man's comment, January 3, 4:35 AM
You have the most inspiring scoops. :)
buket's curator insight, January 4, 1:20 AM

"Your leadership and your organization can reach great heights when you put the effort and time into developing leaders."

Leadership development requires consistent and persistent engagement from all its board members. If all the members are responsible for making leadership development an everyday busiess, 

you can implement a systematic improvement in the process of 

developing leaders in your workplace.

Begoña Iturgaitz's curator insight, January 6, 5:34 PM

Que no se nos olvide el objetivo final.

Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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Learning Theories: Adaptive Control of Thought

Learning Theories: Adaptive Control of Thought | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Learning Theories: Adaptive Control of Thought

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I agree with the last point. It is a simplified version of a complex theory. Having said this, it is a starting point.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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#Harper #Canada's Government Won't Let Its Own #Climate #Scientists Speak to the #Press

#Harper #Canada's Government Won't Let Its Own #Climate #Scientists Speak to the #Press | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Prime Minister Stephen Harper really doesn't like bad news about global warming.

Via CineversityTV
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is not unique for Harper and I am not a Harper fan and apologist. It is common place for politicians and managers to restrict what employees say. It happens in School continuously. We should be asking why publicly funded entities need PR people. Is it to sanitize messages?

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Back to School - Teacher resources on Pinterest

Back to School - Teacher resources on Pinterest | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We've gathered some useful resources for the all-encompassing back-to-school season. Enjoy!

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I enjoy great quotes.

 

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Raising a Moral Child

Raising a Moral Child | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The tactics are different from those used for encouraging achievement.

Via Gust MEES, Amy Melendez
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:
The research cited can carry over into School, as well. Raising children is about the effort of the village. @ivon_ehd1
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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, April 14, 1:14 PM

This is hard to research, but a tentative conclusion would be to praise the character revealed rather than the actions. I think it is important to know the child and situations, but it makes a certain amount of sense.

Deanya Lattimore Schempp's curator insight, April 14, 6:23 PM

Great linked-out presentation of research studies by NYT Sunday Review columnist Adam Grant.

Is this the model of research essay that we will be teaching in class after two more MLA updates?  ;-)

Ofelia Rita Casillas's curator insight, April 15, 4:02 PM

Children imitate what you do,not what you preach!

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#3 Tackle tough conversations

#3 Tackle tough conversations | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We all know the feeling - knowing that you need to have a difficult conversation with someone, but not wanting to jump in.  The longer you go on dreading it, the worse it gets.  So resolve to tackl...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The first point is crucial. What do I need to know about my attitude and what can be changed about it? It does not mean we compromise things we value and think are valuable. It might provide greater insight into their importance.

 

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Back to School Messages

Back to School Messages | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Here is a document from Jo with her 7 favorite messages to set positive classroom norms for the start of the school year.  The last page is a summary that you can post in your classroom.  Positive ...

Via Tom Perran
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The messages allow the beginnings of conversations which can lead to classroom norms continuously being negotiated.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Tom Perran's curator insight, August 19, 6:13 PM

Back-to-school messages from Jo Boaler on setting a positive tone in the mathematics classroom this year. 

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TELL ME WHAT YOU PLAN TO DO WITH YOUR ONE WILD AND PRECIOUS LIFE - Mary Oliver

TELL ME WHAT YOU PLAN TO DO WITH YOUR ONE WILD AND  PRECIOUS LIFE - Mary Oliver | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Quote on a poster. Thick, durable, matte perfection, shouting out your message. Printed on archival, acid-free paper. Ships worldwide. Starting at $18

Via Ken Morrison
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mary Oliver is one of my favourite poets.

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Home schooling and child custody

Home schooling and child custody | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Divorcing parent A wants to home-school the children. Divorcing parent B doesn't. Should a court prefer parent B as the custodial parent, on the theory that home-schooling is generally against the child's best interests?

Via Terry Harding
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are some interesting points made in the article. I worked with home school families and for some of them, ideology and religion played a role in their choices. I think they were in the minority, but still a fair percentage of families.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Terry Harding's curator insight, August 19, 7:49 PM

Things can become quite tricky when you combine home schooling and the family court as this US lawyer explains.

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#UnschoolingRules: #unrules26 - Biologically, the necessary order of learning is: explore, then play, then add rigor.

#UnschoolingRules: #unrules26 - Biologically, the necessary order of learning is: explore, then play, then add rigor. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Play is an important concept in learning and should extend to all learning including adult. It is the serious business of learning and was highly recommended by Piaget, Montessori, Dewey, Gadamer, etc. Rigour is added slowly and carefully as the learner gains confidence.

 

School is not a place of play. The play there is usually contrived and misses the point.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Mastering the Teaching Game - Edutopia

Mastering the Teaching Game - Edutopia | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“ After listening to an interview with top tennis coach Sven Groeneveld, Carol Tomlinson clarifies eight essential principles that teaching shares with high-level sports coaching.”


Via John Evans, simondcollins
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The word mastering is not necessarily the right word, but the points made by Carol Tomlinson are valid. I spent 20 plus years teaching and found I was not close to mastering teaching. That is good. It made me curious and always looking for more.

 

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How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn - KQED (blog)

How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn - KQED (blog) | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
KQED (blog)
How a Bigger Purpose Can Motivate Students to Learn
KQED (blog)
Game-based approaches to learning are far favored over “drill-and-kill” exercises.

Via Jim Goldsmith, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found many students did not always know what they wanted down the road in life. They knew what gave meaning to life in concrete ways, in the moment, and shared that in their learning. I imagine over time it feeds into that long-term purpose.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Jim Goldsmith's curator insight, August 18, 4:35 PM

From the article:  "The students with a purposeful-learning attitude (who agreed with socially oriented statements like “I want to become an educated citizen that can contribute to society”) scored higher on measures of grit and self-control than classmates who only reported self-oriented motives for learning such as wanting to get a good job or earn more money. The purposeful learners were also less likely to succumb to the digital distractions, answering more math problems on the diligence task — and they were more likely to be enrolled in college the following fall, the researchers found."  Worth reading.

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Preparing for Cultural Diversity: Resources for Teachers

Preparing for Cultural Diversity: Resources for Teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
How can teachers prepare for diverse classrooms? There isn't a definitive answer, but there is a wealth of resources online. Here, blogger Matt Davis rounds up some helpful links for teachers.

Via Alexandra Duarte, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I think of all classrooms, regardless of how homogeneous they look, as multicultural. Each person, including the teacher, brings something of them into the classroom that is personally cultural. This is not just about ethnicity, race, religion, etc. and those are important. It is about each person being a unique person and not a nameless individual in a classroom.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Alexandra Duarte's curator insight, August 18, 4:09 PM

Very important these days evne in remote places...

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Elizabeth Green Tackles the Question; Are Teachers Born or Made?

Elizabeth Green Tackles the Question; Are Teachers Born or Made? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
It’s hard to believe that there will ever be an answer to the question of whether teachers are “born” or “made.” As with the question of whether comedians or poets are born or made, the way that th...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We don't build teachers and I don't think they are born per se. Gert Biesta uses the word ordering. There are two types. One is external and it is part of the process of teachers becoming teachers. We are qualified and socialized into teacherhood. Unfortunately, many teachers stop here. The other form of ordering is internal. We make sense or attempt to make sense of what it means in continuously becoming this or that teacher per Gadamer. This is reflective work which works on the Parker Palmer question: "Who is the self that teaches?"

 

Can you imagine the challenge for those who do do not want to be in the classroom and perhaps never wanted to be there? I know a few people like that and they are now School managers and external experts.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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The McDonaldization of Education: the rise of slow

The McDonaldization of Education: the rise of slow | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Slow.  I love this word, and yet it tends to have many negative connotations  in education. Which is too bad because it's the very philosophy we need to save our education system, and give kids the...

Via Shawn Davids, Chris Wejr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

School's objective, as a subset of education, is not to create citizens and individuals. It involves the being and becoming of people, one person at a time. Teaching and learning are not flipping burgers by rote and fixed recipe. It is about engaging and meeting people where they are in their learning as people. This takes time and is patient work that can never be hurried. The late Ted Aoki used the word linger. David Jardine uses whiling over the worth of what we learn.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Chris Wejr's curator insight, Today, 2:11 PM

Would love to talk more about this as a staff... how do we slow down and go deeper in our classes?   Society moves so quickly - how can we help each other and our students to slow down in our learning and thinking?

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Leadership through conversations

Leadership through conversations | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

There is the adage, “Managers focus are results; leaders focus on people.” That really should be “leaders focus on results and people,” as in today’s hyper-competitive business environment, we must hit our financial goals or we may not keep our jobs. But how are we going to keep our good people energized and engaged if we don’t invest the time to know them as our team members and what is important to them?


Via donhornsby, Elysian Training
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leading and conversations are entangled. Pedagogy, as leading, is about engaging students in complex conversations about curricula. The curricula involved are planned and living. The latter belongs to the historical persons entering classrooms, including teachers, which filter the planned curricula.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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donhornsby's curator insight, Today, 11:05 AM

(From the article): Senior managers spend up to 50% of their time in meetings, and much of their remaining time speaking with each other, on calls, and in front of their computers. Most of their communication is through e-mails and or is delegated to those who report to them.


We have to free ourselves up. We have to make our meetings shorter, more efficient and more productive, and then take the time for conversations with our people.

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Nine behaviors of people who positively impact the world

Nine behaviors of people who positively impact the world | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Look around you and you’ll see three kinds of people – those who hate their work, and complain bitterly, those who just tolerate their work and see it as a paycheck and aren’t looking for more (or feel they can’t have more), and finally, those who love their work, and relish it.  The third category is a small subset of all professionals globally, but this group stands out because these are, most often, the people who change the world for the better.

In my work as a success coach and writer, I’ve had the opportunity to connect with people who’ve made a true and measurable impact in the world, including well-known experts, authors, researchers, journalists, scientists, innovators, business geniuses, and entrepreneurs. But among this group of world influencers there are also everyday people who have found a special niche in which they’ve contributed at the highest level.

It’s critical to note that people who’ve made a real difference aren’t all privileged, advantaged or “special” by any stretch.  Many come from disadvantaged families, crushing circumstances and initially limited capabilities, but have found ways to pick themselves up and rise above their circumstances (and their genes) to transform their own lives and those around them.

Researching these makers, shakers and disruptors, and working with my own clients who shape the world around them in powerful and constructive ways, I’ve observed 9 core behaviors that set them apart – habitual ways of behaving and approaching life and work that distinguish them from those who long to make a difference but can’t or won’t find the way.

The 9 core behaviors of people who positively impact the world are:

They dedicate themselves to what gives their life meaning and purpose.

Thousands of people today don’t believe in meaning and purpose as something to discover or pursue in life.  And others believe in a life purpose but won’t take the risk to identify or honor it.  Those with positive influence feel otherwise.  They have found that there is a purpose to their life, and that purpose usually involves some aspect of turning their “mess into a message,” or using what they’ve learned (often the hard way) as a means of being of service to others.  People with a sense of purpose are driven, focused, committed, and lit up from the inside – unable to be deterred or distracted from what they believe is the reason they’re on this planet at this time. This sense of meaning and purpose gives them inexhaustible drive and offers guideposts to follow along the path.  It informs them of what they wish to attend to in life, and what they need to walk away from because it doesn’t support their higher purpose.

They commit to continually bettering themselves.

People who impact the world for the better know that they are not perfect. They understand how their knowledge isn’t “complete” – there are always gaps, biases, limitations and prejudices, and new places to go with their expertise.

Yes, there are powerful narcissists aplenty, but their influence isn’t positive or helpful in the long run – it’s damaging and destructive.  Innovators who positively shape the world come from a “beginner’s mind” and a loving, compassionate heart – with an openness to see, learn, and experience new things on the way to being a better servant of the world.

They engage with people in open, mutually-beneficial ways.

Those with huge positive influence understand the power of relationships, connection, and engaging with the world openly.  They’re not afraid to get “out there” – connecting with others, sharing their knowledge and talents, offering their authentic and often contrarian viewpoints and opinions.  They’ve pushed beyond any introversion, shyness or reluctance to be who they are, and have learned how to relate well with others and build mutually-supportive relationships that catapult both parties to a higher level.  They know that positive, supportive and authentic relationships are the foundational building blocks to anything and everything they want to achieve.

They invest time and energy not in what is, but what can be.

The people I’ve interacted with and interviewed who’ve made a positive impact in the world don’t settle for conformity.  When they see something that agitates and disturbs them, they strive to know more, get to the root of the issue, research and understand the contributing factors, and arrive at new solutions.  They observe gaps and mistakes in common thinking and behavior, and trust themselves in their belief that it’s time to push the boundaries of what’s accepted.   They want to affect change because they believe change will bring a better way to live.

They embrace critique.

The most powerful positive influencers don’t need or want to be “right” – they want to grow and be more effective.  For that to occur, they walk right into critique, and they embrace challenge.  They’re not afraid to put their work out there for others to poke holes in.   They are strong and confident in the face of opposition, yet know how to integrate constructive feedback to strengthen their work and ideas. They engage in open dialogue and welcome scrutiny.

They spread what they know.

We’ve all met authors or “experts” who keep their knowledge secret, close to the vest. They’re afraid to let it out for fear someone will steal it or make money on their ideas.  This is the opposite of the positive influencer’s mindset.  Those who make a true positive difference can’t help but share and teach what they’ve learned. They don’t see their knowledge as just some commodity to sell, as a meal ticket or a money maker – they see it as information that has to be shared with the world for its betterment. They believe their ideas and innovations are of use and value to others, and can’t help but share those openly, and teach others what they’ve learned.  They live the universal principle  – “the more you give, the more you get.”

They uplift others as they ascend.

You’ve experienced, as I have, scores of “leaders” and high-achievers who’ve gotten where they are by stepping on the heads and backs of those in the way.  These are not true leaders or influencers because their power is a sham – it was obtained unethically and is shallow and weak, and can’t be sustained over the long haul.   I have encountered power-mongers who were crushing and cruel to their subordinates and I wondered when they would finally reap what they’ve sown.  Over the long term, this day always comes.

On the other hand, people who positively impact the world not only obtain amazing results in their work, but their process of obtaining these results – how they operate in life — is also inspiring and uplifting.  They are happy to help and support others, and have an overflow of positive energy that enriches the lives of everyone they work with and connect with.  These positive influencers want others to grow.  They walk away from “success-building” opportunities that will be hurtful and damaging to others. They know that those unethical, demeaning or destructive approaches go against the very meaning and purpose they’re committed to.

They view the journey as the goal.

Positive influencers don’t take short cuts or go for the quick buck or easy answer. They don’t view some arbitrary goal or outcome as a destination, because they believe there is no end – it’s all in the journey.  It’s about what they’re learning, experiencing, and building that helps others, and for that, there is no defined end point.  They embrace failure more readily than others as “information” that guides them.  They are more fluid and flexible, and more open to the “how’s” because their ultimate goal is not about upholding their title, income, reputation, stature or power, but about new ways to help and share what they know.

They use their power and influence well.

Sadly, it’s a common occurrence in business today to witness power and influence being wielded as a weapon. It hurts and destroys. Positive influencers use their power well and wisely. They understand the widespread influence they have, the power they have to build up and elevate, or tear down.  Those who impact the world for the better are careful and judicious with their words, actions and behaviors. They operate with heart, and care deeply about their leadership and communication process and style, and the influence they have.  They take it seriously, as a special honor and responsibility not to be flaunted or misused.  They understand their special role, and accept it with grace, compassion, and care.


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

They continually improve themselves is a great place to begin. This is not externally ordered and external ordering. It is something we undertake and emulate Gandhi's words of improving one's self and thus improving the world.

 

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Big Dog, Little Dog: Show Your Work

Big Dog, Little Dog: Show Your Work | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is an interesting article. The basis for the work is Nonaka and Takeuchi's classic work. It is business oriented more than School focused.

 

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Tinkering with Kids – Get in It for the Long Haul | MAKE

Tinkering with Kids – Get in It for the Long Haul | MAKE | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Why do we educators do it? It's fun enough tinkering around with projects on our own, so why must we bang our heads trying to involve a pack of screaming kids from the neighborhood? I've thought through this before, ...

Via Cammie Dunaway, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students love making things. I found we could set up projects in the classroom and students would finish them at home with parents supervising. I always clarified the parents' roles as supervisory. It worked well and students learned complex concepts more easily building projects.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Cammie Dunaway's curator insight, March 24, 3:01 PM

Well said.  Working with Young Makers is equal parts frustration and inspiration.  But the lightbulb moments make it ultimately worthwhile!

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Maya Angelou on Courage and Facing Evil

Maya Angelou on Courage and Facing Evil | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
"There is nothing quite so tragic as a young cynic, because it means the person has gone from knowing nothing to believing nothing."

In 1

Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We need the courage to create ourselves daily. That is a wonderful quote which speaks to the roots of the word courage. Courage comes from coeur which means heart. We are on a daily journey and journey comes from the word journee which is not a measure of time but connotes the idea of journey in a timeless way.

 

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The Advantages of Dyslexia

The Advantages of Dyslexia | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
With reading difficulties can come other cognitive strengths

...

"The trick that makes Escher’s drawings intriguing is a geometric construction psychologists refer to as an “impossible figure,” a line-form suggesting a three-dimensional object that could never exist in our experience. Psychologists, including a team led by Catya von Károlyi of the University of Wisconsin-Eau Claire, have used such figures to study human cognition. When the team asked people to pick out impossible figures from similarly drawn illustrations that did not violate causality, they were surprised to discover that some people were faster at this than others. And most surprising of all, among those who were the fastest were those with dyslexia.

"Dyslexia is often called a “learning disability.” And it can indeed present learning challenges. Although its effects vary widely, children with dyslexia read so slowly that it would typically take them a half a year to read the same number of words other children might read in a day. Therefore, the fact that people who read so slowly were so adept at picking out the impossible figures was a big surprise to the researchers. After all, why would people who are slow in reading be fast at responding to visual representations of causal reasoning?"


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We have privileged the written language and marginalized visuals and imagery. There are many forms of creativity. I had students who read slowly and wrote poorly but were great artists and poets. Those things are not valued in School. I wonder who decided on that?

 

Learning disabilities may not be disabilities. They may be different ways of learning. I watched students share their abilities. The artist helped the writers who helped the artists.

 

I listened to a key note speaker who had little teaching experience and had rushed through teaching to get out of the classroom ridicule the use of haiku in teaching. Yet, I found students enjoyed writing poetry and drawing more than they enjoyed his passion, digital technologies. School managers and experts should spend time with students and learn what students enjoy.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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What makes a conference really irritating?

What makes a conference really irritating? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Conferences are part and parcel of academic life - and there are plenty of ways in which they can be extremely irritating.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found that when I chose my conferences I enjoyed them. When I was ordered to go to any professional development, better seen as training and indoctrination, it was irritating.I can read about the latest tech fad, the habits that make us more effective, and uncritical critical thinking if I want. What I really, really want is choice that makes sense in may context

 

Meaning plays a huge role.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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Wings and Webs: Transforming Learning Through Social Networking

Find Resources at http://weconnect.pbworks.com/

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Srimayee Dam
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The slide with the butterfly flapping its wings needs some clarification. It is not that a butterfly can create a tornado. It is that initial events have lasting and amplifying effects. It is similar to saying first impressions are lasting. The quote about changing the world should be understood in the Ghandian context of the change beginning with one's self. For the amplifying first impressions to be fruitful, perhaps it is our attitude which undergoes the changing.

 

The School managers I worked for the last few years (5-8) were all about changing us without changing themselves. One told us he was working on being less sarcastic in our first staff meeting with him. During the years I worked for him, there seemed to be little improvement. He was sarcastic in public and private. This makes his change negative change. Knowing what we need to change and not changing it is problematic.

 

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Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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5 Signs Your Employees Dislike You

5 Signs Your Employees Dislike You | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In addition to all of your achievements, you're sure that you're a great boss. After all, your leadership skills have helped you climb the ladder of success. But some of the world's top companies succeed in spite of poor leadership, a result of great products or concepts rather than motivated team members.

 

According to entrepreneurial counselor Michelle McQuaid, bad bosses cost businesses $360 billion in lost productivity every year. The stress caused by difficult supervisors can negatively affect an employee's overall health and workplace morale, eventually driving him or her out the door. Since losing one employee costs a business tens of thousands of dollars or more, your business will eventually suffer financially if you can't keep employee loss at a minimum.


Via Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder if in School we consider that 1/2 of new teachers leave the profession within 7 years? That does not account for those who obtain a degree and never enter the classroom. What does that mean in relationship to high staff turnover?

 

One way to look at leaders who are not liked is are they leading or managing. We need both, but I found many School managers focused on managing people and avoiding leading.

 

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Vicki Kossoff @ The Learning Factor's curator insight, August 18, 6:50 PM

If you look closely, you may find indications that you're not as popular with your staff as you think you are.

Jean-Guy Frenette's curator insight, August 19, 10:15 PM

PDGLead

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Back to School: A Surefire Strategy for Building Classroom Community

Back to School: A Surefire Strategy for Building Classroom Community | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Blogger Anne Shaw highlights a fun, beginning-of-the-year strategy that includes a roll of toilet paper.

Via Alexandra Duarte, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I have done this in several settings and it might work. It just did not in the settings I was in those times. It might have been a lack of time. What is important is community. I don't think there is one sure fire strategy. Open communication, including listening closely, being vulnerable, honest, trustworthy, etc. are important in community. It is about working through conflict and difference in ways that allow us to open up. That might begin with a strategy like this one, but needs continuous follow through.

 

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Alexandra Duarte's curator insight, August 18, 4:07 PM

A roll of toilet paper :) to start the school year :))))))

 

Rescooped by Ivon Prefontaine from Edu-Vision- Educational Leadership
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The Conversation Teachers Need To Have With Leadership

The Conversation Teachers Need To Have With Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

This year, many of us will spend hours in school meetings feeling demotivated, bored, unappreciated, and stressed. We will spend a lot of time resenting our colleagues and our administrators, which will impact our teaching and our students’ success. It doesn’t have to be this way. You deserve to have your time valued, because you are on a grand mission to help the world learn. We need you inspired! Unfortunately, many of our administrators do not know how to value your time or support you. Therefore, I’m sending you on a mission to have a conversation with your leadership about changing how meetings are organized at your school. By having this one positive conversation with your leadership, you can possibly avoid wasting hours attending ineffective meetings. You will also do your school, staff, and students a tremendous amount of good, since meetings will focus on collaboration with peers to problem solve issues.


Via Patti Kinney, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Most of the professional development I experienced the last 5-8 years I taught was imposed. It was a School manager's idea of what we should do rather than what I thought was important in my classroom. It made little difference what I said. I was forced to attend sessions on critical thinking, the latest in digital technology, and the habits that we needed to indoctrinate students with. Rather than just argue, I went, put in my time, and planned something I felt was relevant to my situation.

 

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