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Four Key Questions to Help Identify Your Organization's Future Leaders

Four Key Questions to Help Identify Your Organization's Future Leaders | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In today's business world, emotional intelligence has been identified as the key ingredient in successful leadership. Here are four key questions that will help determine the individuals within your ranks that have what it takes to lead.


Via Amy Melendez, HR Trend Institute, David Hain, Kenneth Mikkelsen
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Four excellent questions presented.

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donhornsby's curator insight, August 14, 2013 7:07 AM

The question is: how do you decide whom to keep and who among your current employees has the potential to develop into future leaders?

Miklos Szilagyi's curator insight, August 14, 2013 10:39 AM

A good one... one more about the Y gen, which bosses they will make? Surely, they will break down the hierarchy (they hate hierarchy), empowerment, engagement are their force... they should be careful also with some elements of the boss' job (until there will still be some...):

- they like cooperation, collaboration but sometimes a boss has to make decisions which will not be very popular, they should get used to this...

- they operates in great transparency... well, they cannot share the next week firing round...

- they like when work and privat life are overlapping, friends like to work together... well, if the boss will wake in the subordinate friend's flat in the Saturday morning, it's ot impossible that the friend will ask for a favor on the Tuesday morning...

- They like to be sucessful, cheered, and therefore they have a tendency to avoid risks...

- They are great in instant messages through the day but ot so much in serious, difficult communicational situation...

 

So, the advantages have their counterpart... those of them aspiring for executive positions, they should learn couple of things which will not come to them naturally...

Scott Span, MSOD's curator insight, August 14, 2013 10:40 AM

How are you planning...?

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Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 3:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 6:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 7:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures

Struggle Means Learning: Difference in Eastern and Western Cultures | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In Japanese classrooms, teachers consciously design tasks that are slightly beyond the capabilities of the students they teach, so the students can actually experience struggling with something just outside their reach.

Via Mel Riddile, Srimayee Dam
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We do want students to struggle a bit with their learning. It is part of building resiliency.

 

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What Happens When Students Control Their Own Education? - The Atlantic

What Happens When Students Control Their Own Education? - The Atlantic | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
When a New Hampshire district found itself struggling with low test scores and high turnover, it made a radical decision: Flip the traditional model and let kids take over the classrooms.

Via Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The teacher and teaching assume different responsibilities in classrooms where students take responsibility for their learning.

 

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Education Readings October 24th

Education Readings October 24th | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
By Allan Alach I welcome suggested articles, so if you come across a gem, email it to me at allan.alach@ihug.co.nz. This week’s homework!   The Myth of “Knowledge Gaps” “I asked this question:...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Another post with links to excellent readings with diverse topics i.e. the threat of standardization, meta-cognition, the revival of constructionism, etc.

 

@ivon_ehd1

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A surprising new argument against using kids’ test scores to grade their teachers

A surprising new argument against using kids’ test scores to grade their teachers | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
This time, the question is whether some teachers tend to teach better children, skewing their students' test results.

Via Christopher Tienken
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There is no basis for using test scores to grade teachers. Learning and test scores are students' responsibilities. We need people who know what teachers do in the classroom to provide feedback for teachers to help improve their work.

 

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Why Our Complex World Needs Connective Leadership

Why Our Complex World Needs Connective Leadership | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“Diversity trumps ability” as a sufficiently diverse, large group of non-experts often outperforms a small group of experts,” found Future Perfect authorSteven Johnson. In our increasingly complex, disruptive world, we will face more situations where we’ll benefit from calling on the so-called wisdom of the crowd.


Via John Lasschuit ®™
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

That leadership begins in Schools where diversity walks in, logs on, etc. each day. It is not happening but it is where it can happen.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, October 21, 1:41 PM

This is Connected Educators month. We talk more and more about collaboration and working well together. While I'm not convinced the crowd is always the wisest, I think it's likely we'll hear more creative ideas from the crowd than if we work exclusive of the so-called non-experts.

Linda Alexander's curator insight, October 21, 2:33 PM

"Diversity trumps ability" is a clear message to all classroom teachers, institutions & business innovation organizers.  

John Thurlbeck, FCMI FRSA's curator insight, October 22, 4:28 AM

Loved this article scooped by John Lasschuit! What intrigued me was the diagram plotting the relationships. As a Mind Map devotee, it was always going to lure me in! What was even more interesting was the notion of connective leadership. Great leaders are communicators; they work with and through people and they build relationships that, in turn, develop further relationships. If they don't, they are not great leaders!

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Can we find democracy in the classroom?

Can we find democracy in the classroom? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Bird Droppings October 21, 2014 Can we find democracy in the classroom? “There can never be peace between nations until there is first known that true peace which is within the souls of men.” Black...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

This is an important question. Luminaries such as Dewey, Ranciere, Freire, etc. wrote about this topic and question.

 

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Small Schools Work in New York ~ NY Times Editorial

Small Schools Work in New York ~ NY Times Editorial | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

by the Editorial Board of the NY Times

 

"Mayor Bill de Blasio has been critical of the signature education strategy of his predecessor, Mike Bloomberg, a strategy that involved closing large, failing high schools and replacing them with smaller specialized schools that offer a more rigorous curriculum and a more personal brand of instruction. But over the last few years, the Bloomberg approach has been vindicated by an innovative, multiyear study showing that the poor, minority students who attend small specialized schools do better academically than students in a control group who attend traditional high schools.


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Small Schools work because students and teachers can have healthy and supportive relationships.

 

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4 Keys to Designing the Classroom of the Future -- THE Journal

4 Keys to Designing the Classroom of the Future -- THE Journal | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Forget about rows of desks pointed at a whiteboard. Here's how mobile technology is reshaping teaching and learning.

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

So the images make the classroom look quite similar to classrooms of the past with students sitting alone. The key difference is they each have a laptop. Is that really different?

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, October 20, 2:11 PM

"Interactive whiteboards are on their way out." This kind of pronouncement is true for so much of technology and leads to many of the challenges educators face. What do we get? How long will it last? Will we have just gotten folks trained on the new tech when there's even newer, possibly better stuff available?


To the last question: Count on it. And plan your learning environments for flexibility because there is no way to anticipate precisely what any changes will warrant.

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Learners don't know what's best for them

Learners don't know what's best for them | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Annie Murphy Paul has a nice article about autodidacts -- yes, there are some, but most of us aren't.  MOOCs are mostly for autodidacts.  The paper from Educational Psychologist is excellent, and I...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Hubert Dreyfus' model of skill acquisition supports the idea that most learning requires teaching. There is a point where students would lack enough knowledge and wisdom to direct their learning fully. The idea is not no input but being helped along the path.

 

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for the love of learning: 3 reasons to stop rewarding and punishing children

for the love of learning: 3 reasons to stop rewarding and punishing children | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Intrinsic motivation is an internal ordering and responds to the question about how we make sense of the world. Extrinsic motivation is an external ordering where someone tries to create a product based on often alien outcomes for the child and adult.

 

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10 Facts About Being Homeless in the USA by Bill Quigley

10 Facts About Being Homeless in the USA by Bill Quigley | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
10 Facts About Being Homeless in the USA by Bill Quigley As the Crisis Deepens, the Government is Doing Less to Help... Three True Stories... Renee Delisle was one of over 3500 homeless people in S...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Although it looks at homelessness through an American lens, the article is a reminder to Canadians about the issues of poverty and homelessness in wealthy countries.

 

What are the impacts on children and School?

 

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How Should Professional Development Change?

How Should Professional Development Change? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.

 

Learn more:

 

http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

 


Via Gust MEES, Bruno Koffi
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Without choice and voice, professional development might be training which is for seals and not human beings.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, October 18, 9:07 AM
Professional Development in Other Countries
The Shanghai teacher and Singapore teacher ratios of teaching time to collaboration time reveal even larger disparities. The Shanghai teacher reported teaching 15 hours a week and collaborating 7.5 hours a week. The Singapore teacher spends 18 hours teaching and 15 hours collaborating each week. Spending so much time collaborating with other teachers every week is not a reality for U.S. teachers who feel lucky to chat with their colleagues at lunch or in biweekly faculty meetings.

The differences in professional development systems do not end here though. In Singapore, teachers are expected to do 100 hours of professional development (paid by the ministry of education) every year. That would be 500 hours in five years. In Shanghai, teachers are expected to do a minimum of 360 hours of professional development every five years -- compare that to the mere 120 hours of professional development that is typically required of U.S. teachers every five years.


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2013/01/23/is-your-professional-development-up-to-date/

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How to Become a Connective Leader Who Fosters Conviviality and Collaboration

How to Become a Connective Leader Who Fosters Conviviality  and Collaboration | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
To boost bonding among others so they are more apt to work (or play) well together, ask them, when together, to do two powerfully simple things that can be done rather quickly....

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Leading is always about civility and conviviality. Without those qualities we cannot be leaders.

 

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Stop 20th Century Thinking

Stop 20th Century Thinking | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

In the 21st Century our approach to education can and should be very different from previous centuries. The basic skills we teach are pretty much the same, but the tools we have to use require...Learn more:- http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/- http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Rise+of+the+Professional+Educator


Via Gust MEES, Mika Auramo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We are almost 15% of the way through the 21st Century and this is still being discussed.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, Today, 11:01 AM

In the 21st Century our approach to education can and should be very different from previous centuries. The basic skills we teach are pretty much the same, but the tools we have to use require...


Learn more:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/07/10/education-collaboration-and-coaching-the-future/


http://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-learning-and-teaching/?tag=Rise+of+the+Professional+Educator



Murray Turner's curator insight, Today, 3:30 PM

Clearly stated

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Mark Twain on Slavery, How Religion Is Used to Justify Injustice, and What His Mother Taught Him About Compassion

Mark Twain on Slavery, How Religion Is Used to Justify Injustice, and What His Mother Taught Him About Compassion | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

"Twain with his longtime friend John T. Lewis, of whom the author remarked: 'I have not known an honester man nor a more respect-worthy one.' Lewis is said to have inspired the character of Jim in 'Huckleberry Finn.'"

 

"Samuel Langhorne Clemens, better known as Mark Twain, is celebrated as America’s greatest humorist — from his irreverent advice to little girls to his snarky stance on creativity to his masterwork on masturbation. But underpinning his winsome wit was piercing insight into the human spirit and all its perplexities. From The Autobiography of Mark Twain: Volume 1 (public library) — which also gave us Twain on how morality and intelligence hinder each other — comes a moving anecdote about how his mother taught him the essence of empathy.

 

“'Poor thing, when he sings, it shows that he is not remembering, and that comforts me; but when he is still, I am afraid he is thinking, and I cannot bear it. He will never see his mother again; if he can sing, I must not hinder it, but be thankful for it. If you were older, you would understand me; then that friendless child’s noise would make you glad.'

 

"She never used large words, but she had a natural gift for making small ones do effective work."



Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Mark Twain continues to have much to teach us.

 

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Leadership is More Than Skin Deep -

Leadership is More Than Skin Deep - | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Some people understand leadership to be like an article of clothing. They believe they can put leadership on or take it off as they need it. Some of us see a quality or skill in a window and decide to add it to our leadership ensemble. They may add a scarf or shoes to their leadership wardrobe …

Via Anne Leong, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am reading Arne Naess' work on deep ecology. Most of what we do is superficial. It takes hard work to go deep.

 

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Becky Willmoth's curator insight, October 22, 7:27 AM

Individuals who truly know themselves develop a frame for their values, strengths, passion and vision. This knowledge enables them to lead with authenticity and integrity, creating a connection with and commitment from those around them. Leaders that lack this self awareness are more like to behave inconsistently, eroding trust and undermining their leadership effectiveness.

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Homework: An unnecessary evil? … Surprising findings from new research

Homework: An unnecessary evil? … Surprising findings from new research | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
A new study on the academic effects of homework offers not only some intriguing results but also a lesson on how to read a study -- and a reminder of the importance of doing just that: reading studies (carefully) rather than relying on summaries by journalists or even by the researchers themselves. Alfie Kohn explains.

Via Peter Mellow
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I found that unless parents could help (not do) with the homework assigning it was counter-productive. Quite often, I would ask students to have a conversation with parents about a social issue or something of that nature.

 

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Bibiana Vargas's curator insight, October 23, 7:17 AM

Son los deberes realmente necesarios?  En esta pieza publicada en el Washington Post la evidencia muestra que no existe relación ninguna entre los resultados (notas) que obtienen los alumnos que hacen trabajos fuera del entorno escolar y los queno, y si existe es bastante modesta.  Lo que nos ahorraríamos en tiempo, esfuerzo y frustración no tendría precio!  ¿Será qué los deberes diarios pueden ser cosa del pasado?  

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Vygotsky on Collective Creativity

Vygotsky on Collective Creativity | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I just re-read a classic article about creativity, written almost 100 years ago by the legendary Russian psychologist Lev Vygotsky. Vygotsky's theory--that innovations emerge from social networks a...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

An excellent summary of some classic thinking about creativity.

 

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seepn110_b's curator insight, October 21, 1:20 PM

An interesting approach from the great Vygotsky,

in our day's also we talk about collective Intelligence

 

 

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Leadership Tips: 6 Powerful Questions to Ask Yourself Daily

Leadership Tips: 6 Powerful Questions to Ask Yourself Daily | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

“If you really want to create a shift in your business and get the most from your leadership, make these powerful questions part of your daily ritual.”


Via Anne Leong, John Michel, Josée Lafontaine, Bobby Dillard, Dean J. Fusto, Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Be the change that you want to see in the world - Gandhi.

 

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Web Connect Agency's curator insight, October 20, 10:44 PM

www.webconnectagency.com

Brotman Nusbaum Ibrahim's curator insight, Today, 7:52 AM

This is great for everyone. It provides great advice not only for business but in every day life.

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What Happens When Parents Decide to Opt-Out of Standardized Tests?

What Happens When Parents Decide to Opt-Out of Standardized Tests? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Parents are increasingly worried that the emphasis on standardized test scores is destroying children's love of learning.

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Only good things can happen when parents exert their rights when it comes to standardized testing of any form.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, October 20, 1:10 PM

Sure, we celebrate this rebellion against standardized tests, the latest punching bag in all that's wrong with education. And yet, we recognize that we want a mechanism to measure where our kids are. And yet, we worry about the overabundance of "big data." and yet, we wonder if we have enough of the "right" data. And yet, we wonder how we compare against other kids, other schools, other states, other countries. And yet, we want to empower our kids to learn and grow. And yet, we don't want them to fall behind. And yet. . . .


In other words, much of what we do in school conspires to exhaust students and teachers and administrators and parents in what and how we teach. Reform isn't changing this and fixing that. Reform is hard work that takes time and for which there has to be a plan, and for which there must be realistic expectations.


I'm not a fan of standardized tests, but I'm not a fan of making change for the sake of change. When we institute any changes at any level for any reason, we have to know why and what we hope to accomplish, and we have to have tried to consider possible unintended consequences.

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Transformational Leadership - The Latest Thinking in Leading Effective Teams

Transformational Leadership - The Latest Thinking in Leading Effective Teams | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Understand what Transformational Leadership is and how to use it to really drive people-centred success.


Via Robert Hubert
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Transforming leading (the use of gerunds suggests ongoing and never-ending) is ethics based.

 

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What I Wish I'd Known as a New Teacher

What I Wish I'd Known as a New Teacher | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Now, almost two decades after my first year in the classroom, here's a few things I wish I'd known about myself, about teaching, and about my students.
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The fact we have about 50% of young teachers leaving the profession within the first seven years of beginning and an increasing number of part-time contracts being used suggests a need for a different conversation.

 

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It's Privilege (and Race), not Effort

It's Privilege (and Race), not Effort | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
In the tradition of Mel Riddile (see here and here), I want to assert: In the U.S., it's privilege (and race), not effort. The U.S. has a powerful addiction to a false myth, the myth of meritocracy...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When  children come to School hungry, tired, abused, etc. what should we expect in their learning. It takes a special effort to reach out and build bridges with those students. It takes caring teachers and safe relationships.

 

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Ready to Learn? The Key Is Listening With Intention

Ready to Learn? The Key Is Listening With Intention | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Listening and observing can be passive activities—in one ear and out the other, as our mothers used to say. Or they can be rich, active, intense experiences that lead to serious learning.


Via Cindy Riley Klages, Suvi Salo
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Students need to be helped in learning how to listen. It is not something that comes without help.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, October 18, 8:56 PM

I concur that good listening is a skill to be learned and practice. We need to model critical listening, too. It can easily be part of how we interact with our students.

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“Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong”

“Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong” | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Poor kids who do everything right don’t do better than rich kids who do everything wrong is a fascinating, and depressing, article in The Washington Post.

Via Yashy Tohsaku
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Meritocracy and the idea that we all have the same opportunities do not exist in School.

 

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