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Those Who CAN Do, Teach

Those Who CAN Do, Teach | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Two years ago, I left the for-profit sector to teach business full-time at a university. Since making that shift, I’ve heard a certain cliché more times than I can remember: “those who can’t do, teach.”

This phrase puzzles me every time I hear it. I think that on some level, it’s puzzled society ever since George Bernard Shaw penned it in 1903. (Shaw’s actual quote was, “He who can, does. He who cannot, teaches.”)


Via David Hain
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We do need integration of doing and teaching. Learning happens when we have people who can do and people who can teach. They are not mutually exclusive. Although when we apply the correct or incorrect quote to education, many teachers need to leave.

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David Hain's curator insight, May 30, 2013 6:00 AM

So does doing have more value than teaching? We need both, and the phrase shouldn't imply mutual exclusivity anyway...

 

But I'm happy to promote the value of teaching and teachers.

Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity
Complexity, chaos, and ambiguity are aspects of leadership and learning. Without those we cannot innovate and create.
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Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat

Why It's Time To Put Students In The Driver's Seat | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Think about how you or the people you work with approach the creation of a blended learning lesson plan. The first steps of coming up with and flushing out your initial idea. Then, scouring the web to find safe, factually accurate sites that are not blocked by your school filters and checking the fine print …

 

This method of teaching does require a certain amount of bravery. There is a very real chance that when a student asks you a question (How do I add media? How do I change the font? How do I import pictures? etc. etc.) you will have to say the dreaded “I don’t know”. But the neat thing is, your students are ok with this. You’re all learning as you go. More often than not another child in the class will be using the same site or will have at least used it before. If a classmate knows the answer, they can step into the role of teacher – from which much confidence is gained and leadership skills are learned.


Even the most reserved kid really enjoys teaching their teacher a trick or two. If no one knows the answer, they can collaborate to find the solution; an activity that provides important life skills with many real-world applications. All while leaving the initiative, process development and ownership of the learning itself right where it belongs, in the hands of the learners.


Gust MEES: I started with it in 2002 already and was a pioneer in my country, BUT I got BEST results! Make sure to work TOGETHER as a TEAM with the students, learners, create ALSO some groups where the BEST work together with the weakest. YOU will love it later and YOU will miss it as it gives YOU a direct feedback of WHAT THEY learned and YOU adjust on demand and necessity... WHEN the BEST feel boring, give THEM a special task to motivate THEM ;) ===> Adjust <===.


Concerning the questions from the students, please check my advice here:


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2014/01/04/practice-better-ways-to-say-i-dont-know-in-the-classroom/


http://gustmees.wordpress.com/2012/05/02/work-sheet-teachers-best-practiceshowto/



Via Gust MEES
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I am not sure what is being suggested is putting students in charge. It is more about a complicated conversation between teachers and students about the subject matter. There is an in-between space where teachers and students meet.

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Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 12:40 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine Hi, give me some time (???), please and I will create a blog about how I did it ages ago (2002-2003), thanks. For the moment GO for #DeepTHINKing and try to find out (paper & notes & ideas) how You could realize it with your actual #ProfessionalDevelopment, make some #Brainstorming with THE #LEARNERS in mind ;) A good exercise ;) Let me know, thanks ;)
Ivon Prefontaine's comment, May 28, 3:57 PM
Thank you Gust.
Gust MEES's comment, May 28, 4:18 PM
@Ivon Prefontaine I will take it is a priority to create THAT blog, stay tuned, please ;)
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8 Characteristics of the "Innovator's Mindset"

8 Characteristics of the "Innovator's Mindset" | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Recently I explored the notion of the “Innovator’s Mindset”, and have thought a lot about this idea.  As I look to write on the topic of “Leading Innovative Change” within schools, we are looking t...

Via Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I agree with the final paragraph which suggests that innovation is just the latest in a litany of buzzwords. This is most often promoted by the so-called experts who are not in the classrooms. It is easy to sit outside, look in, and pretend one knows what is happening. We need less of this and more support for teaching. What is happening in School is managing and not leading. It is stating imperatives rather than working with and conversing with teachers.

 

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It’s not what you say, it’s what people hear

It’s not what you say, it’s what people hear | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

The key takeaway from his book is actually part of the title:

It’s not what you say, it’s what people hear.

In Words That Work: It’s Not What You Say, It’s What People Hear Luntz breaks down the ten main lessons he’s learned from years of crafting political messages; lessons we can all learn from:

1) Simplicity: Use Small Words

“Avoid words that might force someone to reach for the dictionary… because most Americans won’t. They’ll just placidly let your real meaning sail over their heads or, even worse, misunderstand you. You can argue all you want about the dumbing down of America, but unless you speak the language of your intended audience, you won’t be heard by the people you want to reach.”

2) Brevity: Use Short Sentences

“Be as brief as possible… The most memorable political language is rarely longer than a sentence. “I Like Ike” was hardly a reason to vote for the man, but the simplicity of the slogan matched the candidate and the campaign.”

3) Credibility Is As Important As Philosophy

“People have to believe it to buy it. As Lincoln once said, you can’t fool all of the people all of the time. If your words lack sincerity, if they contradict accepted facts, circumstances, or perceptions, they will lack impact… The words you use become you — and you become the words you use.”

4) Consistency Matters

“Too many politicians insist on new talking points on a daily basis, and companies are running too many different ad executions. By the time we begin to recognize and remember a particular message, it has already been changed… “The breakfast of champions” tagline for Wheaties was first launched back in 1935 and is still going today. Hallmark’s “When you care enough to send the very best” debuted in 1934, and “Say it with flowers” for FTD dates all the way back to 1917.”

5) Novelty: Offer Something New

“In plain English, words that work often involve a new definition of an old idea… What matters most is that the message brings a sense of discovery, a sort of “Wow, I never thought about it that way.”

6) Sound and Texture Matter

“The sounds and texture of the language should be just as memorable as the words themselves. A string of words that have the same first letter, the same sound, or the same syllabic cadence is more memorable than a random collection of sounds.”

7) Speak Aspirationally

“Messages need to say what people want to hear… The key to successful aspirational language for products or politics is to personalize and humanize the message to trigger an emotional remembrance.”

8) Visualize

“Paint a vivid picture. From M&M’s “Melts in your mouth not in your hand” to Morton Salt’s “When it rains, it pours,” to NBC’s “Must See TV,” the slogans we remember for a lifetime almost always have a strong visual component, something we can see and almost feel.”

9) Ask a Question

“Is it live, or is it Memorex?” “Where do you want to go today?” (Microsoft) “Can you hear me now?” (Verizon Wireless)… “Got Milk?” may be the most memorable print ad campaign of the past decade. The creator realized, whether intentionally or not, that it’s sometimes not what you say but what you ask that really matters.”

10) Provide Context and Explain Relevance

“You have to give people the “why” of a message before you tell them the “therefore” and the “so that.”… if it doesn’t matter to the intended audience, it won’t be heard. With so many messages and so many communication vehicles competing for our attention, the target audience must see individual, personal meaning and value in your words.”


Via Vilma Bonilla
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

These are good points to consider in teaching.

 

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Vilma Bonilla's curator insight, Today, 6:46 PM

Excellent points!

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Innovation Excellence | Planting the Seeds of Innovation in Education

Innovation Excellence | Planting the Seeds of Innovation in Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

by Stephan Vincent

 

"What does an innovation class look like? 

 

"First, with each new group of students, Don has to teach them different skills: how not to be compliant, how to think differently, how they should challenge and confront him instead of taking his words for granted. “Right now, it is natural for kids to be compliant, to sit and listen to what their teachers have to say, without questioning. The system beats the creativity out of them. Kids have been trained that way; my first job is to unteach them”. He hears new students in his class asking him what he expects them to do. His answer: “I won’t tell you, you need to find your own opportunity, find collaborators, I’m only here to help you, not to tell you what to do”. At the beginning, some kids freeze up because it is such a foreign and disruptive concept to them. However, they quickly grasp the benefit of it.

"During the first weeks of the class, students will identify their own opportunity to develop a project. They will formulate a plan of action and time table, find collaborators and resources, like any entrepreneur would do. “Online collaboration enables access to information, resources and mentors."

 

- See more at: http://www.innovationexcellence.com/blog/2014/08/31/planting-the-seeds-of-innovation-in-education/#sthash.YsmrsvMl.dpuf


Via Jim Lerman
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Buddhist tradition tells us that seeds are both good and bad. When we plant them, we have to tend to them and it is not always a set way.

 

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educational-origami - Bloom's Digital Taxonomy

educational-origami - Bloom's Digital Taxonomy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

Via Christiane Moisés, Miloš Bajčetić, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I wonder if Benjamin Bloom had any way of anticipating this. It is interesting that the infographic suggests lots of lower order thinking skills.

 

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Why Study Grammar?

Why Study Grammar? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
If you're reading this, it's a safe bet that you know English grammar. But how much do you know about grammar? And why should anybody bother learning?

Via Pilar Moral
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

There are many reasons to study grammar. The way we speak and write suggests what is important in the world. What do we objectify?

 

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National teaching Assistants Day - TA Day - Teaching Personnel

National teaching Assistants Day - TA Day - Teaching Personnel | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
As creators of National Teaching Assistants’ Day, Teaching Personnel is delighted to illustrate the positive impact teaching assistants have on schools, teachers, parents and pupils and it akes place on 16th September every year.

Via Elaine Roberts, Ph.D
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Perhaps I was fortunate, but I had excellent teaching assistants. I tried not to take them for granted any day. They were invaluable and provided insights I often overlooked.

 

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Elaine Roberts, Ph.D's curator insight, September 16, 4:52 AM

Be especially nice to your teaching assistants today, especially if you are fortunate enough to have any.

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The Single-Most Powerful Attribute All Geniuses Share

The Single-Most Powerful Attribute All Geniuses Share | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Creativity pie chart by James Clear
What separates the likes of Steve Jobs, J.K. Rowling, or Pablo Picasso from the rest of us? Over at Entrepreneur, James Clear argues it comes down to pure grit:
How do creative geniuses come ups with great ideas?

 


Via Yashy Tohsaku, Alfredo Calderon
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We often associate genius with being smart and it is, however it is smart in a different way. A synonym for genius is gift and it is about the spirit of a person and their natural ability. I read the article in that light. Each person was dedicated to something which came natural to them. Perhaps part of being a genius is knowing what we are good at.

 

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Alfredo Calderon's curator insight, September 16, 7:45 AM

add your insight...

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JULIA G. THOMPSON: Overcoming a Negative School Climate

JULIA G. THOMPSON: Overcoming a Negative School Climate | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
JULIA G. THOMPSON: Overcoming a Negative School Climate http://t.co/JwtcNodC1P

Via NASSP Community of New Principals, Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

At the heart of a positive School environment and climate is positive relationships between students and staff. This means staff have to get along and work together, as well. Providing space for teachers to speak safely is an important consideration.

 

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NASSP Community of New Principals's curator insight, September 14, 8:12 PM

There are great insights here on what you can do if the school climate is negative when you arrive.  It happens, and is a huge first challenge for a new principal.  There are some good resources noted as well.

Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, September 15, 1:30 PM

Sometimes we come into a new position excited and positive but are stymied by a negative climate. Or perhaps that climate has developed over time in our current school. Here is some help to move you in the right direction.

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How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing

How to Write a Lot: A Practical Guide to Productive Academic Writing | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Writing is a hard work and that is why we always find excuses to postpone it.If you are working on a dissertation, a thesis, a research proposal, journal article, or grant proposal then chances you have already experienced some of those detestable...

Via ICTPHMS, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Writing is hard work.

 

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For Teachers, Many Paths Into The Classroom ... Some Say Too Many

For Teachers, Many Paths Into The Classroom ... Some Say Too Many | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
One in five newly hired teachers has skipped university preparation for teaching. Indiana is the latest state to make entering the classroom easier.

Via Linda Alexander
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

It is likely we need to rethink the way teachers are prepared for the classroom, but no preparation is not an option. We already are losing many teachers and the challenges are changing rapidly.

 

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, September 15, 6:35 PM

There should be alternative paths to teaching for individuals with college degrees, especially in math, science & technical skill areas.  The caveat is that these job candidates must pass some sort of content area test, showcase their knowledge of the curriculum development & student assessment processes and demonstrate classroom management skills during the hiring process. Frankly, I don't believe classroom management skills are a given without hours upon hours of observation and practice. And I also agree that the for-profit model, as in charter school operations, doesn't fare very well.  However, the independent schools have used "content specialists" with college degrees for decades with enormous success.  If the higher education schools consistently provided top-shelf teacher candidates, the issue would dissolve all by itself. 

Linda Alexander's comment, September 16, 8:00 PM
Ivon, I agree with you! Faculty retention is a growing problem.
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Your creativity is a gift to others

Your creativity is a gift to others | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The last paragraph is the key to the article.Teaching is always teaching someone therefore relational in nature. It is about teaching some thing to someone which is also relational.

 

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Becoming a Teacher: Great expectations in a real world: Where does PD take place?

Becoming a Teacher: Great expectations in a real world: Where does PD take place? | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Professional development is an ongoing and endless process and we teachers will never stop being learners

Via Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Judith Butler proposed that being is like a noun. We are a teacher is always the starting point for becoming something new. This is risky business for teachers. It might be that professional development is always happening. Teachers require time and space to make sense of what their experiences mean suggesting that teaching and living are hermeneutic adventures.

 

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Shanthi Cumaraswamy Streat's curator insight, September 12, 9:49 AM

Roseli Serra's latest post.

Quran Coaching's curator insight, September 13, 9:41 AM

The Quran-Coaching is the best platform for the quran learning by taking online quran classes.
http://goo.gl/st4aLZ
Like/Share/Comment.
‪#‎quran‬ ‪#‎onlineQuran‬ ‪#‎islam‬ ‪#‎Tajweed‬

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Educating Parents About Education

Educating Parents About Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Many parents today have an educational perspective based on 20th century pedagogy and methodology. Teachers need to educate them about where education is now.

Via Gust MEES, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The second paragraph begins with the line "things have changed." In response, I would say the more things change the more the stay the same. The important point in the article is engaging teachers in a conversation and asking them to be part of the solutions not for now, but for the future. We have too many experts stating imperatives rather than engaging in conversations, asking questions, and listening.

 

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Gust MEES's curator insight, Today, 3:58 PM

Many parents today have an educational perspective based on 20th century pedagogy and methodology. Teachers need to educate them about where education is now.


Lori DiMarco's curator insight, Today, 7:52 PM

Our goal (TCDSB) this year is to have parent focus groups to determine what parents need to understand the 21st Century Learner - and then we will begin working with parent groups to address these needs

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This Week In Education: Thompson: Value-Added True Believers Should Listen to Principals

This Week In Education: Thompson: Value-Added True Believers Should Listen to Principals | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Sadly, a new Gates-funded study, "Principal Use of Teacher Effectiveness Measures for Talent Management Decisions," provides an ideal metaphor for what is wrong with value-added evaluations, in particular, and corporate school reform, in general. I do not question the quality of work of its authors - Ellen Goldring, Christine M. Neumerski, Mollie Rubin, Marisa Cannata, Timothy Drake, Jason A. Grissom and Patrick Schuermann, or its findings. The problem is that the report seems to assume that principals who do not agree with the Gates Foundation are incorrect and need retraining; it doesn't consider the possibility that value-added models aren't appropriate for teacher evaluations. Goldring et. al found that 84% of the principals they interviewed believed teacher-observation data to be valid "to a large extent" for assessing teacher quality, but only 56% viewed student achievement or growth data to be equally valid. The study acknowledged that value added is perceived to have “many shortcomings.” Principals have doubts whether the data will hold up to official grievance processes. Principals also perceive that teachers have little trust in teacher effectiveness data. Education Week’s Denisa Superville reports that value added expert Douglas Harris echoes the findings, “the results confirmed feedback he had received from...

Via Nancy J. Herr
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Test results are simply the outputs based on abstract input ideas in curricula-as-plans. They assume that teachers control learning. What teaching is about is complex conversations with students inviting the latter into their learning. It is risky and can be refused, but teaching is not about guaranteeing learning. It is about caring enough to invite students into their learning again and again.

 

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Confessions of a Gen-Ed Junkie – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education

Confessions of a Gen-Ed Junkie – The Conversation - Blogs - The Chronicle of Higher Education | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

1. I’ve always been a jumper...

What I find in gen ed, then, is the opportunity to follow strands of thought, to make connections, to engage in purposeful wandering across disciplinary and divisional lines. In the last 10 years I’ve learned more about biology, psychology, art, politics, and physics than I’d thought possible. Or, to be more accurate: than I’d thought possible once I became a professor.

2. I believe my field matters even to people not in my field...

I love teaching my English majors, and I’m not just saying this to keep my department chair happy. But in my major classes, I’m preaching to the pre-converted. There’s something about working with students outside of my discipline, something about introducing them to a whole new spectrum of thought that keeps me invigorated.

3. Our students will use gen ed a lot more than they—or we—expect...

What gen ed teaches is not just content, but adaptation. As students move from their majors to a general-education course—or from one general-education course to another—what they should be encountering—always—is the challenge of shifting paradigms, of conflicting ways of thinking about the world, of contrasting means of solving problems.

That these experiences are sometimes uncomfortable is perhaps exactly the point: Students need opportunities to think about how what they did two years ago in statistics can be adapted to psychology. They need to think about the conceptual relationships between poetry and computer programming (hint: eloquence and efficiency). They need to struggle to understand the ways in which separating the “noise” from the relevant numbers in a geological data set are not that different than getting to the heart of a Supreme Court ruling.

They need, simply put, to practice leaping from one field to another, one question to another, on challenge to another—constantly adapting their methods of understanding and of solving these problems. That’s what life is like. And everything else aside, I’m pretty sure my job is to prepare students for life.

Paul Hanstedt is a professor of English at Roanoke College in Salem, Va. He tweets@curriculargeek.

 

 

 

 


Via iPamba
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

When we enjoy what we do, it is contagious.

 

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The Saddest Thing About Being a Teacher.

The Saddest Thing About Being a Teacher. | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
The saddest thing about being a teacher is seeing the amount of wasted potential leaving our school gates every year.How dispiriting it is to see what standardized testing and what some (often well...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Teaching is about inviting students into healthy relationships and creating the environment where learning can happen. It is hard work, but worth while. When we step away from the neo-liberal agenda which is about creating worker bees, teaching is about teaching someone and relationships.

 

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How to Bring Sustainable Change to Your Organizational Culture

How to Bring Sustainable Change to Your Organizational Culture | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it

It’s like being lost in the wilderness if you initiate any major change effort in your organization without specifically knowing how cultures effectively evolve or change. It’s one of the greatest leadership challenges, but few truly understand how cultures evolve.


Via Roger Francis, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Change is a static word. We want the change we create to be sustainable. In our world, we want change which is mastered and manageable. Is that what we really want?

 

I found that School change was often window dressing. The change was simply the latest fad, technique, tool, etc. It did not mean much, but sustained an outdated status quo.

 

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Why is Leadership Important? -

Why is Leadership Important? - | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
We spend a lot of energy and time thinking about leadership. We try to understand it, to put it to work for ourselves. We wonder how people become leaders, whether they are born leaders or are made along the way. We identify and evaluate leadership styles, assessing which are the most effective. We analyze the …

Via Anne Leong
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

We each can be a leaders, but this is not a relativism gone wild. There is a pedagogic nature to leading therefore it is about teaching. Context and situation become important. Questions such as what is important to teach and learn are fundamental. Teaching is always relational. We teach something about something. It is not a wholesale discarding of who and what came before, but a caring process that brings about prudent and wise change in the community.

 

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Leadership In The Age Of Complexity: From Hero To Host, by Margaret Wheatley and Deborah Frieze

Leadership In The Age Of Complexity: From Hero To Host, by Margaret Wheatley and Deborah Frieze | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
For too long, too many of us have been entranced by heroes. Perhaps it's our desire to not have to do the hard work, to rely on someone else to figure things out. But perhaps it's time for us to face the truth of our situation -- that we're all in this together, that we all have a voice -- and figure out how to mobilize the hearts and minds of everyone in our workplaces and communities.

Via Anne Leong, Wise Leader™, Roy Sheneman, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

A great question is posed in the article. Why do we continue to hope for heroes to emerge? I would add, "Why do we settle for managers and false prophets?"

 

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Six Ways to Be a Lifelong Learner

Six Ways to Be a Lifelong Learner | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
I cringe when I hear an adults joke about not having read a book since high school. I especially cringe if the person who says that has any regular interaction with young people. It’s not so much t...

Via Christine Heine, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

I cringe with the contemporary notion about what a life-long learner is. The term has been appropriated into a neo-liberal agenda to mean we are learning what the boss says we should. Having said this, the article makes valuable points. For example, reading and setting aside a fund for new books are excellent ideas. Reaching out to others who might add to who you are is also another good idea.

 

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A Soliloquy on Contingency - Hybrid Pedagogy

A Soliloquy on Contingency - Hybrid Pedagogy | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
What can be done to assuage some of these tensions -- to alleviate them before they result in the unhealthy infighting that we witnessed after MLA 2014?

Via ICTPHMS, Mark E. Deschaine, PhD
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The key point made is about contingent loyalty. It is not enough the person be loyal to the School. The School and its bosses need to be loyal in return.

 

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Blended Learning in the Mix: The Engaged Administrator

Blended Learning in the Mix: The Engaged Administrator | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
For a successful school-wide blended learning program, administrators should remove obstacles, let teachers lead, and remain engaged with the process as well as the results.

Via Grant Montgomery, Dean J. Fusto
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The basis of being a learner is being learned to some extent. It would be different to include teachers' voices in the conversation.

 

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All the difference

All the difference | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Well, it looks like my self-imposed hiatus is drawing to a close. Recently, the road I was traveling on diverged in some unexpected ways as I resigned my high school teaching position a week ago. N...
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

The pipeline awaits round-pegged students and teachers who do not fit into other geometrically shaped holes.

 

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Tech Transformation: Flipping Grade 4 and Flipping Bloom's Taxonomy Triangle

Tech Transformation: Flipping Grade 4 and Flipping Bloom's Taxonomy Triangle | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

If we do a good job with the creating/synthesizing, evaluating, analyzing, etc. students will understand and remember. It shouldn't make a difference if we flip the classroom or not.

 

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Educational Leadership: Motivation Matters: Curiosity Is Fleeting, but Teachable

Educational Leadership: Motivation Matters: Curiosity Is Fleeting, but Teachable | Leadership, Innovation, and Creativity | Scoop.it
Founded in 1943, ASCD (formerly the Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is an educational leadership organization dedicated to advancing best practices and policies for the success of each learner.

Via Monica S Mcfeeters, Jocelyn Stoller, Lynnette Van Dyke
Ivon Prefontaine's insight:

Curiosity and creativity work together.

 

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Monica S Mcfeeters's curator insight, September 12, 11:08 PM

Curiosity is always a basic strong motivator. Arousing curiosity can be a challenge after life often trains people to discourage people from following natural curiosities to discover knowledge..